Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using PowerShell scripts for some UI automation of a WPF application. Normally, the scripts are run as a group, based on the value of a global variable. It's a little inconvenient to set this variable manually for the times when I want to run just one script, so I'm looking for a way to modify them to check for this variable and set it if not found.

test-path variable:\foo doesn't seem to work, since I still get the following error:

The variable '$global:foo' cannot be retrieved because it has not been set.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

EDIT: Use stej's answer below. My own (partially incorrect) one is still reproduced here for reference:


You can use

Get-Variable foo -Scope Global

and trap the error that is raised when the variable doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd personally go with stej's answer; I commented so on it and I upvoted it as well. I just cannot remove this one anymore. –  Joey Aug 6 '13 at 15:31

Test-Path can be used with a special syntax:

Test-Path variable:global:foo
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the very clever use of the variable PsProvider –  Cédric Rup Jul 2 '10 at 13:27
    
Thx ;) imo that's the correct way, no such workaround like -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue or try/catch with Get-Variable. –  stej Jul 2 '10 at 14:20
1  
Ah, nice one. Why do I even bother with PS questions ;-). I can't delete my answer anymore, though. –  Joey Jul 2 '10 at 20:25
1  
Because cmd.exe is boring :) No need to delete, it's ok to have all possible answers for inspiration. –  stej Jul 3 '10 at 9:12
    
I used this concept, but in my case I had to test for variable:local:foo –  Andrew Shepherd Mar 10 at 22:53

So far, it looks like the answer that works is this one.

To break it out further, what worked for me was this:

Get-Variable -Name foo -Scope Global -ea SilentlyContinue | out-null

$? returns either true or false.

share|improve this answer
    
Further along in that thread, they mention that Test-Path variable:global:foo will work, as per stej's answer. –  Timbo Mar 7 '12 at 23:54

You can assign a variable to the return value of Get-Variable then check to see if it is null:

$variable = Get-Variable -Name foo -Scope Global -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

if ($variable -eq $null)
{
    Write-Host "foo does not exist"
}

# else...

Just be aware that the variable has to be assigned to something for it to "exist". For example:

$global:foo = $null

$variable = Get-Variable -Name foo -Scope Global -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

if ($variable -eq $null)
{
    Write-Host "foo does not exist"
}
else
{
    Write-Host "foo exists"
}

$global:bar

$variable = Get-Variable -Name bar -Scope Global -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

if ($variable -eq $null)
{
    Write-Host "bar does not exist"
}
else
{
    Write-Host "bar exists"
}

Output:

foo exists
bar does not exist
share|improve this answer

There's an even easier way:

if ($variable)
{
    Write-Host "bar exist"
}
else
{
    Write-Host "bar does not exists"
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm having that code fail on me right now. –  mbourgon Dec 17 '13 at 19:54
1  
What if $variable does exist, but equal to $false? –  Andrew Shepherd Mar 10 at 22:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.