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I am getting the following error using curl:

curl: (77) error setting certificate verify locations:
  CAfile: /etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt
  CApath: none

How do I set this certificate verify locations? Thanks.

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2  
What OS/distro are you on? You should install the ca-certificates package (that's what it's called on debian/ubuntu). –  igorw Jul 1 '10 at 19:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From $ man curl:

--cert-type <type>
    (SSL) Tells curl what certificate type the provided  certificate
    is in. PEM, DER and ENG are recognized types.  If not specified,
    PEM is assumed.

    If this option is used several times, the last one will be used.

--cacert <CA certificate>
    (SSL) Tells curl to use the specified certificate file to verify
    the peer. The file may contain  multiple  CA  certificates.  The
    certificate(s)  must be in PEM format. Normally curl is built to
    use a default file for this, so this option is typically used to
    alter that default file.
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This error is related to a missing package: ca-certificates. Install it.

In Ubuntu Linux (and similar distro):

# sudo apt-get install ca-certificates

In CygWin via Apt-Cyg

# apt-cyg install ca-certificates

The documentation tells:

This package includes PEM files of CA certificates to allow SSL-based applications to check for the authenticity of SSL connections.

As seen at: Debian -- Details of package ca-certificates in squeeze

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5  
ca-certificates is already the newest version, yet I'm still getting the error –  Pastor Bones Jan 10 '13 at 17:09
    
Of course, you'll get this same error if you try to install apt-cyg via the recommended method using curl and raw.github.com. –  10gistic Jun 23 '13 at 22:26

The quickest way to get around the error is add on the -k option somewhere in your curl request. That option "allows connections to SSL cites without certs." (from curl --help)

For example:

$ curl -o /usr/bin/apt-cyg https://raw.github.com/cfg/apt-cyg/master/apt-cyg

gave me the following error response:

curl: (77) error setting certificate verify locations:
  CAfile: /usr/ssl/certs/ca-bundle.crt
  CApath: none

I added on -k:

curl -o /usr/bin/apt-cyg https://raw.github.com/cfg/apt-cyg/master/apt-cyg -k

and no error message. As a bonus, now I have apt-cyg installed. And ca-certificates.

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2  
That might get around the error, but it also makes the "secure" connection become insecure. –  Tim Jul 10 '13 at 18:18
    
Not really. As far as I know, you can't just bypass the encryption of a secure connection, so it's still encrypted and going to only one endpoint. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but the only risk you run is that you could fall prey to a man-in-the-middle attack. Still not likely a risk if you're using curl. –  10gistic Jul 29 '13 at 16:46
5  
Yes, really. The "-k" option is shorthand for "--insecure". If you have man-in-the-middle what do you think he's doing with your data ? Spoiler alert: he's decrypting it, stealing it, and possibly modifying it and injecting back into the insecure stream. Straight from the man page : "-k, --insecure (SSL) This option explicitly allows curl to perform "insecure" SSL connections and transfers. All SSL connections are attempted to be made secure by using the CA certificate bundle installed by default. This makes all connections considered "insecure" fail unless -k, --insecure is used." –  Tim Aug 3 '13 at 10:59
    
If you need SSL you need privacy and verification — the -k flag means you're losing verification. Depending on your needs this may be acceptable. MITM are non-trivial attacks if you assume your network and the server you're communicating with are secured from interlopers (can you make that assumption?). The risk increases depending on the type of you data (sourcecode and certs are riskier than images). You can verify the integrity of the data after the transfer (checksums etc.) but now you're shifting your trust onto that checksum channel. In the end -k gives you quite a bit more work. –  Mark Fox Mar 4 at 20:12
    
So does it mean that if i am using a Self signed certificate. I should be using the option -k. As it may not be possible to verify the Self signed certificate ? –  Linus Jul 25 at 10:04

It seems your curl points to a non-existing file with CA certs or similar.

For the primary reference on CA certs with curl, see: http://curl.haxx.se/docs/sslcerts.html

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