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The output does not sort in ascending order. Here is the code and the output I am getting.

The actual output is:

Amy Jose Jeremy Alice Patrick 
Alan Amy Jeremy Helen Alexi

While the expected output is:

Amy, Alice, Jeremy, jose, Patrick
Alan, Amy, Alexi, Helen, Jeremy

The code is:

public class MyFriends
{
   static Set<String> names = new TreeSet<String>();

  public MyFriends()
   {
      super();
      names = new TreeSet<String>();
   }

  public static void exampleMethod()
   {
     String[] name1 = {"Amy", "Jose", "Jeremy", "Alice", "Patrick"};
     String[] name2 = { "Alan", "Amy", "Jeremy", "Helen", "Alexi"};

     for (int i = 0; i < name1.length; i++)
     {
         names.add(name1[i]);
     }

     for (String aString : name1)
     {
       System.out.print(" " + aString);
     }

     for (int i = 0; i < name2.length; i++)
     {
        names.add(name2[i]);
     }

     for (String bString : name2)
     {
       System.out.print(" " + bString); 
     }

   }    
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're currently just writing out the arrays again... adding the contents of the array into a TreeSet isn't going to change the array.

Instead of the two blocks writing out the arrays, you should have one, right at the end:

for (String name : names)
{
    System.out.print(" " + name); 
}

If you actually want two lines of output, you should use two TreeSet instances.

If you want to sort the arrays, you should just sort them in place. When you add a value to a TreeSet, it neither knows nor cares where it comes from. It's just a reference to a string object (in this case).

share|improve this answer
    
Pssh.. also for (String aString : name1) should be changed. – BalusC Jul 1 '10 at 20:45
    
@BalusC: I hoped I'd made that clear in the "this is what you should use to output the set" but I'll clarify further... – Jon Skeet Jul 1 '10 at 20:45
    
Then the output would be... Alice Amy Jeremy Jose Patrick Alan Alexi Alice Amy Helen Jeremy Jose Patrick Is it not possible the way I want it, as quoted above – DiscoDude Jul 1 '10 at 20:46
    
Quickdraw death again by Jon Skeet arrrgggg – Zak Jul 1 '10 at 20:48
    
@downln: As I said: If you want two lines of output, you should treat the two arrays separately, and use two TreeSet instances. – Jon Skeet Jul 1 '10 at 20:55

I'd rewrite it as:

public class MyFriends
{
   // I just changed the name for testing purtposes
   public static void main(final String[] argv)
   {
       final Set<String> names = new TreeSet<String>();
       final String[] name1 = {"Amy", "Jose", "Jeremy", "Alice", "Patrick"};
       final String[] name2 = { "Alan", "Amy", "Jeremy", "Helen", "Alexi"};

       add(name1, names);
       display(names);

       // you wanted to display each array separately right, not the total of all names in both 
       // arrays
       names.clear();

       add(name2, names);
       display(names);
    }

    private static void add(final String[]    namesToAdd,
                            final Set<String> names)
    {
       for(final String name : namesToAdd)
       {
           names.add(name);
       }
    }

    private static void display(final Set<String> names)
    {
       for(final String name : names)
       {
           System.out.print(" " + name);
       }

       System.out.println();
    }
}

This avoids the issue where you are passing the wrong variable (as Jon points out in his answer) because passing the wrong thing will cause a compile time error.

It is also a good idea to make methods for repeating code - code likes to have names, and you give a chunk of code a name by putting it inside a method.

EDIT: In keeping up with the answer from Jon :-) here is the way I would really do it, with two sets:

public class Main
{
    // I just changed the name for testing purtposes
    public static void main(final String[] argv)
    {
        final Set<String> namesSet1;
        final Set<String> namesSet2;
        final String[] nameArray1 =
        {
            "Amy",
            "Jose",
            "Jeremy",
            "Alice",
            "Patrick"
        };
        final String[] nameArray2 =
        {
            "Alan",
            "Amy",
            "Jeremy",
            "Helen",
            "Alexi"
        };

        namesSet1 = makeSet(nameArray1);
        display(namesSet1);

        namesSet2 = makeSet(nameArray2);
        display(namesSet2);
    }

    private static Set<String> makeSet(final String[] namesToAdd)
    {
        final Set<String> names;

        names = new TreeSet<String>();

        for(final String name : namesToAdd)
        {
            names.add(name);
        }

        return (names);
    }

    private static void display(final Set<String> names)
    {
        for(final String name : names)
        {
            System.out.print(" " + name);
        }

        System.out.println();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you TofuBeer – DiscoDude Jul 1 '10 at 21:19

You're going to need pass your TreeSet a special Comparator to get this ordering:

Amy, Alice, Jeremy, jose, Patrick
Alan, Amy, Alexi, Helen, Jeremy

First off, both Alice and Alexi come before Amy in alphabetical order. Also, jose comes after Patrick because it starts with a lowercase letter (use Comparator.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER or a Collator if you want to ignore case in ordering).

share|improve this answer
    
I can't use Comparator but I am very happy from the replies and I will work on Jon Skeet advise. Thank you. – DiscoDude Jul 1 '10 at 21:03

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