Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry, my C/C++ is not that good, but the following existing code looks like garbage even to me. It also has a bug - fails when str = "07/02/2010" terminated by '\0' - . I think that instead of fixing a bug, it might as well be rewritten. In Python it is just 'kas\nhjkfh kjsdjkasf'.split(). I know this is C-ish code, but it cannot be that complicated to split a string! Sticking to the same signature, and without using extra libraries, how can I improve it - make it short and sweet? I can tell that this code smells, for instance because of the else clause all the way at the end.

LINE THAT FAILS:

_tcsncpy_s(
    s.GetBuffer((int) (nIndex-nLast)),
    nIndex-nLast,
    psz+nLast,
    (size_t) (nIndex-nLast)
);

With the string "07/02/2010" terminated by '\0' it will try to write 11 characters into a buffer that is only 10 characters long.

FULL FUNCTION:

#define 

// This will return the text string as a string array
// This function is called from SetControlText to parse the
// text string into an array of CStrings that the control
// Gadgets will attempt to interpret

BOOL CLVGridDateTimeCtrl::ParseTextWithCurrentFormat(const CString& str, const CGXStyle* pOldStyle, CStringArray& strArray )
{
    // Unused:
    pOldStyle;

    // we assume that the significant segments are seperated by space

    // Please change m_strDelim to add other delimiters

    CString s;

    LPCTSTR psz = (LPCTSTR) str;

    BOOL bLastCharSpace = FALSE;
    DWORD size = str.GetLength()+1;

    // (newline will start a new row, tab delimiter will
    // move to the next column).
    // parse buffer (DBCS aware)
    for (DWORD nIndex = 0, nLast = 0; nIndex < size; nIndex += _tclen(psz+nIndex))
    {
        // check for a delimiter
        if (psz[nIndex] == _T('\0') || _tcschr(_T("\r\n"), psz[nIndex]) || _tcschr(_T(" "), psz[nIndex])
            ||!_tcscspn(&psz[nIndex], (LPCTSTR)m_strDelim))
        {
            s.ReleaseBuffer();
            s.Empty();
            // abort parsing the string if next char
            // is an end-of-string
            if (psz[nIndex] == _T('\0'))
            {
                if (psz[nIndex] == _T('\r') && psz[nIndex+1] == _T('\n'))
                    nIndex++;

                _tcsncpy_s(s.GetBuffer((int) (nIndex-nLast)),
                    nIndex-nLast,
                            psz+nLast,
                            (size_t) (nIndex-nLast));
                CString temStr = s;
                strArray.Add(temStr);
                temStr.Empty();
                break;
            }

            else if (_tcscspn(&psz[nIndex], (LPCTSTR)m_strDelim) == 0 && !bLastCharSpace)
            {
                if (psz[nIndex] == _T('\r') && psz[nIndex+1] == _T('\n'))
                    nIndex++;

                _tcsncpy_s(s.GetBuffer((int) (nIndex-nLast)),
                    nIndex-nLast,
                            psz+nLast,
                            (size_t) (nIndex-nLast));
                CString temStr = s;
                strArray.Add(temStr);
                temStr.Empty();
                bLastCharSpace = TRUE;
                // abort parsing the string if next char
                // is an end-of-string
                if (psz[nIndex+1] == _T('\0'))
                    break;

            }
            // Now, that the value has been copied to the cell,
            // let's check if we should jump to a new row.
            else if (_tcschr(_T(" "), psz[nIndex]) && !bLastCharSpace)
            {
                if (psz[nIndex] == _T('\r') && psz[nIndex+1] == _T('\n'))
                    nIndex++;

                _tcsncpy_s(s.GetBuffer((int) (nIndex-nLast)),
                    nIndex-nLast,
                            psz+nLast,
                            (size_t) (nIndex-nLast));
                CString temStr = s;
                strArray.Add(temStr);
                temStr.Empty();
                bLastCharSpace = TRUE;
                // abort parsing the string if next char
                // is an end-of-string
                if (psz[nIndex+1] == _T('\0'))
                    break;
            }

            nLast = nIndex + _tclen(psz+nIndex);


        }
        else
        {   
            // nLast = nIndex + _tclen(psz+nIndex);
            bLastCharSpace = FALSE;
        }
    }
    if (strArray.GetSize())
        return TRUE;
    else
        return FALSE;
}

EDIT: m_strDelim = _T(","); and this member variable is used in this function only. I suppose I see the point of tokenization now - it tries to parse a date and time ... wait, there is more! Here is the code which calls this function below. Please help me improve this as well. Some of my co-workers claim that C# makes them no more productive than C++. I used to feel like an idiot for not being able to say the same about me.

// SetControlText will attempt to convert the text to a valid date first with
// the help of COleDateTime and then with the help of the Date control and the
// current format

BOOL CLVGridDateTimeCtrl::ConvertControlTextToValue(CString& str, ROWCOL nRow, ROWCOL nCol, const CGXStyle* pOldStyle)
{
    CGXStyle* pStyle = NULL;
    BOOL bSuccess = FALSE;

    if (pOldStyle == NULL)
    {
        pStyle = Grid()->CreateStyle();
        Grid()->ComposeStyleRowCol(nRow, nCol, pStyle);
        pOldStyle = pStyle;
    }

    // allow only valid input
    {
        // First do this
        CLVDateTime dt;

        if (str.IsEmpty())
        {
            ;
            // if (Grid()->IsCurrentCell(nRow, nCol))
            //  Reset();
            bSuccess = TRUE;
        }
        else if (dt.ParseDateTime(str,CLVGlobals::IsUSDateFormat()) && (DATE) dt != 0)
        {
            SetDateTime(dt);
            if (m_bDateValueAsNumber)
                str.Format(_T("%g"), (DATE) dt);
            else
                str = dt.Format();
            bSuccess = TRUE;
        }
        else
        {
            // parse the string using the current format
            CStringArray strArray;
            if (!ParseTextWithCurrentFormat(str, pOldStyle, strArray))
                return FALSE;

            UpdateNullStatus(m_TextCtrlWnd);

            SetFormat(m_TextCtrlWnd, *pOldStyle);

            int nArrIndex = 0;
            for(int i=0; i<m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets.GetSize(); i++)
            {
                int val = m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i]->GetValue();   
                // s.Empty();
                if(m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i]->IsKindOf(RUNTIME_CLASS(SECDTNumericGadget)))
                {
                    // TRACE(_T("The value %s\n"), strArray[nArrIndex]);
                    ((CLVDTNumericGadget*)m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i])->m_nNewValue = _ttoi(strArray[nArrIndex]);    
                    nArrIndex++;
                    if (nArrIndex>strArray.GetUpperBound())
                            break;
                }
                else if(m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i]->IsKindOf(RUNTIME_CLASS(SECDTListGadget)) && val!=-1)
                {
                    int nIndex = ((CLVDTListGadget*)m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i])->FindMatch(strArray[nArrIndex], ((CLVDTListGadget*)m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i])->GetValue()+1);
                    if (nIndex!=-1)
                    {
                        // TRACE(_T("The value %s\n"), strArray[nArrIndex]);
                        ((CLVDTListGadget*)m_TextCtrlWnd.m_gadgets[i])->SetValue(nIndex);
                        nArrIndex++;
                        if (nArrIndex>strArray.GetUpperBound())
                            break;
                    }

                }

                CLVDBValue dbDate = m_TextCtrlWnd.GetDateTime();
                if (dbDate.IsNull())
                    str = _T("");
                else
                {
                    CLVDateTime dt = (CLVDateTime)dbDate;
                    if (m_bDateValueAsNumber)
                        str.Format(_T("%g"), (DATE) dt);
                    else
                        str = dt.Format();
                }
            }
            bSuccess = TRUE;
        }
    }

    if (pStyle)
        Grid()->RecycleStyle(pStyle);

    return bSuccess;
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

The String Toolkit Library (Strtk) has the following solution to your problem:

#include <string>
#include <deque>
#include "strtk.hpp"
int main()
{ 
   std::string data("kas\nhjkfh kjsdjkasf");
   std::deque<std::string> str_list;
   strtk::parse(data, ", \r\n", str_list);
   return 0;
}

More examples can be found Here

share|improve this answer
    
Hm ... I wonder if I can steal just a couple of headers and cpp files without installing the whole thing. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 2 '10 at 2:53
16  
@Hamish: Feel free to take what you like, its all under CPL. If you don't have Boost, or just use vanilla C++ with STL you can just comment out #define ENABLE_LEXICAL_CAST #define ENABLE_RANDOM #define ENABLE_REGEX, and its should all work, its all explained in the readme.txt. –  Matthieu N. Jul 2 '10 at 3:43

In C++, it's probably easiest to use a stsringstream:

std::istringstream buffer("kas\nhjkfh kjsdjkasf");

std::vector<std::string> strings;

std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(buffer),
          std::istream_iterator<std::string>(),
          std::back_inserter(strings));

I haven't tried to stick to exactly the same signature, mostly because most of it is non-standard, so it doesn't apply to C++ in general.

Another possibility would be to use Boost::tokenizer, though obviously that does involve another library, so I won't try to cover it in more detail.

I'm not sure if that qualifies as "bizarro syntax" or not. I may have to work a bit on that part...

Edit: I've got it -- initialize the vector instead:

std::istringstream buffer("kas\nhjkfh kjsdjkasf");

std::vector<std::string> strings(
    (std::istream_iterator<std::string>(buffer)),
    std::istream_iterator<std::string>());

The "bizarro" part is that without the extra parentheses around the first argument, this would invoke the "most vexing parse", so it would declare a function instead of defining a vector. :-)

Edit2: As far as the edit to the question goes, it seems nearly impossible to answer directly -- it depends on too many types (e.g., CGXStyle, CLVDateTime) that are neither standard nor explained. I, for one, can't follow it in any detail at all. Offhand, this looks like a fairly poor design, letting the user enter things that are more or less ambiguous, and then trying to sort out the mess. Better to use a control that only allows unambiguous input to start with, and you can just read some fields that contain a date and time directly.

Edit3: code to do the splitting that also treats commas as separators could be done like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <locale>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>

class my_ctype : public std::ctype<char> {
public:
    mask const *get_table() { 
        // this copies the "classic" table used by <ctype.h>:
        static std::vector<std::ctype<char>::mask> 
            table(classic_table(), classic_table()+table_size);

        // Anything we want to separate tokens, we mark its spot in the table as 'space'.
        table[','] = (mask)space;

        // and return a pointer to the table:
        return &table[0];
    }
    my_ctype(size_t refs=0) : std::ctype<char>(get_table(), false, refs) { }
};

int main() { 
    // put our data in a strea:
    std::istringstream buffer("first kas\nhjkfh kjsdjk,asf\tlast");

    // Create a ctype object and tell the stream to use it for parsing tokens:
    my_ctype parser;
    buffer.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), &parser));

    // separate the stream into tokens:
    std::vector<std::string> strings(
        (std::istream_iterator<std::string>(buffer)),
        std::istream_iterator<std::string>());

    // copy the tokes to cout so we can see what we got:
    std::copy(strings.begin(), strings.end(), 
        std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Cool, we use VS2010 to compile this, so Boost is a bit of a stretch, but I am sure that lots of libraries are available. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 1 '10 at 23:01
6  
Wait, Jerry, where do I specify the list of characters to tokenize on? See answer by Beh Tou Cheh above for example. he has: strtk::parse(data, ", \r\n", str_list);. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 2 '10 at 18:20
1  
They're specified in the locale used by the stream. By default it'll only be whitespace, but you can create a locale with a ctype facet that uses whatever you want. stackoverflow.com/questions/1894886/… –  Jerry Coffin Jul 2 '10 at 18:38
    
Boost.Tokenzier is ideal for splitting up strings. The iterator interface is very easy to work with too for those familiar with the STL. –  Dr. Watson Jul 2 '10 at 20:22
    
@Jerry, I noted the edit, and I appreciate it. I am going to test this next week now. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 2 '10 at 22:30

The best way to do it would be using strtok. That link should be self explanatory on how to use it, and you can use multiple delimiters as well. Very handy C function.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, but I'm sure someone will have a crazy C++ solution including bizarro syntax to take away your upvotes. –  Carl Norum Jul 1 '10 at 22:26
1  
This is a good solution for C. If you want to use C++, there's nothing "crazy" about coding to the language's strengths. –  Cogwheel Jul 1 '10 at 22:29
11  
If strtok is the right answer, you've usually asked the wrong question. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 1 '10 at 22:34
3  
One small detail worth noting about strtok: it's not thread safe. I don't know if this applies to OP's question really, but still notable. –  Tom Jul 1 '10 at 23:45
1  
There's usually nothing wrong with strtok() modifying its input - in most of the cases where you want to parse with strtok() you don't care about the unparsed string any more. The string literal complaint is also bogus; runtime parsing of a compile-time constant string is most definitely a corner case. –  caf Jul 2 '10 at 1:44

Quite an over the top way of sorting this problem is to use the Qt libraries. If you're using KDE then they're installed already. The QString class has a member function split which works like the python version. For example

QString("This is a string").split(" ", QString::SkipEmptyParts)

returns a QStringList of QStrings:

["This", "is", "a", "string"]

(in pythonic syntax). Note the second argument is required or else should the words be split by multiple spaces, each individual one would be returned.

In general I find with the help of the Qt libraries, most of the simplicity of python, eg. simple string parsing and list iteration, can be handled with ease and with the power of C++.

share|improve this answer
4  
We are a MSFT shop, so I can use whatever standard libs come with VS2010. I like Linux, open source, etc, but I cannot just install arbitrary libs. I could steal a couple of .h and .cpp files though if a license allows it. –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 2 '10 at 2:51

Parsing strings in C/C++ rarely turns out to be a simple matter. The method you posted looks like it has quite a bit of "history" involved in it. For example, you state that you want to split the string on white space. But the method itself appears to be using a member variable m_strDelim as part of the splitting decision. Simply replacing the method could lead to other unexpected issues.

Using an existing tokenizing class such as this Boost library could simplify things quite a bit.

share|improve this answer
3  
"Parsing strings in C/C++ rarely turns out to be a simple matter." It is a simple matter, but solutions like parsing tend to involve processing strings character-by-character and loops. I.e. I can't think of something (standard) like python's split() function in C++.... –  SigTerm Jul 1 '10 at 23:43

You can use boost::algorithm::split. I.e.:

std::string myString;
std::vector<std::string> splitStrings;
boost::algorithm::split(splitStrings, myString, boost::is_any_of(" \r\n"));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 The Boost String Algorithms library is essential for string operations! –  Matthieu M. Jul 2 '10 at 6:47
    
I really wish I knew why people were downvoting this. –  Billy ONeal Jul 2 '10 at 20:54
    
I did not downvote. I suppose it is because of my comment (not original post) that I prefer to use standard libs only ... –  Hamish Grubijan Jul 2 '10 at 22:32
    
@Hamish Grubijan: Yes -- agreed -- I was going to delete my answer except I saw that the most upvoted answer to this question is asking to use another library.... –  Billy ONeal Jul 3 '10 at 1:49
6  
@Billy: I've +1 in the hopes you don't break out into tears :D –  Matthieu N. Jul 3 '10 at 23:03

A better method than my other answer: TR1's regex feature. Here's a small tutorial to get you started. This answer is C++, uses regular expressions (which is perhaps the best / easiest way to split a string), and I used it myself recently, so I know it's a nice tool.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.