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Can someone point out the main differences between the two?

It seems that, at least conceptually, the two are very closely related. If I were to hazard a guess, I would say that the publish/subscribe method is a subset of the mediator pattern (since the mediator need not necessarily be used in the publish/subscribe manner, but the latter seems to require a sort of mediator object). Is that anywhere near close to it?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

How I would describe the difference is that in mediator you probably care if the end application receives the message. So you use this to guarantee who is receiving the message. Whereas with pub/sub you just publish your message. If there are any subscribers they will get it but you don't care.

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According to this page, the publish-subscribe model is an implementation of the mediator pattern.

Edit

I should note that the design patterns are called "patterns" precisely because there are going to be differences among every implementation. They aren't so much a set of decreed, canonical forms as they are a collection of observations on how people already write software. So there really isn't any way for a design to "strictly" adhere to a design pattern.

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i think one main point of difference is the context of the problem. Although the same problem can be solved through both these patterns, the real decision points are :- 1. how much of the changes to be brought about by the events are dependent on the general context and 2. how frequently are the listeners expected to change. The classical case for mediator pattern best illustrates this , where you have a complex UI where you have a lot of components and the updation on each of those has a complex interdependency on the state of other similar component. Although you can solve this problem by pub/sub only wherein ur components listen for the events and has all the logic to update itself provided, the context object along with the event carries all necessary information for the components to make such decision. Here the advantage is obviously the proper encapsulation of logic pertaining to a component within itself , but the downside is that if such components are supposed to be changed often then u have to replicate this logic fully in the new one you are intending to bring in. To try to solve that problem with mediator is introducing another layer and abstracting away updation logic from the components which become thinner and only represent the concern of representation(UI look and feel) and thus is very easy to change. The only problem i have with this approach is that the updation logic now seems to spill to anohter component and any updation of the system wud require one to change the component and the mediator if the component behaviour is also to change. That to me is the major dilemma/trade-off we need to solve. Please correct me if i haven't got anything correctly.

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The implementation could be the same, but logically they are different (The difference is simple, but it is hard to see). I'll explain it in a simple way below.

Pratically, in the implementation of the Publish/Subscribe pattern you will have at least an object with the methods "publish" and "subscribe". But you can have also more of them, so the communication between components is not centralized by definition.

In the implementation of the Mediator pattern you will have JUST ONE object with methods "publish" and "subscribe". So the communication is "centralized" by definition.

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