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Do either of the below approaches use the correct mathematics for rotating a point? If so, which one is correct?

POINT rotate_point(float cx,float cy,float angle,POINT p)
{
  float s = sin(angle);
  float c = cos(angle);

  // translate point back to origin:
  p.x -= cx;
  p.y -= cy;

  // Which One Is Correct:
  // This?
  float xnew = p.x * c - p.y * s;
  float ynew = p.x * s + p.y * c;
  // Or This?
  float xnew = p.x * c + p.y * s;
  float ynew = -p.x * s + p.y * c;

  // translate point back:
  p.x = xnew + cx;
  p.y = ynew + cy;
}
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4  
I don't quite understand. What are cx and cy? Also, you have declared your function of type POINT, but it doesn't return a POINT, or indeed anything. –  Brian Hooper Jul 2 '10 at 1:09
1  
@Brian Hooper: +1 for pointing out the benefits of meaningful variable names ;) –  Cogwheel Jul 2 '10 at 4:43
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It depends on how you define angle. If it is measured counterclockwise (which is the mathematical convention) then the correct rotation is your first one:

// This?
float xnew = p.x * c - p.y * s;
float ynew = p.x * s + p.y * c;

But if it is measured clockwise, then the second is correct:

// Or This?
float xnew = p.x * c + p.y * s;
float ynew = -p.x * s + p.y * c;
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From Wikipedia

To carry out a rotation using matrices the point (x, y) to be rotated is written as a vector, then multiplied by a matrix calculated from the angle, θ, like so:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/e/d/0ed0d28652a45d730d096a56e2d0d0a3.png

where (x′, y′) are the co-ordinates of the point after rotation, and the formulae for x′ and y′ can be seen to be

alt text

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This is extracted from my own vector library..

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Returns clockwise-rotated vector, using given angle and centered at vector
//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CVector2D   CVector2D::RotateVector(float fThetaRadian, const CVector2D& vector) const
{
    // Basically still similar operation with rotation on origin
    // except we treat given rotation center (vector) as our origin now
    float fNewX = this->X - vector.X;
    float fNewY = this->Y - vector.Y;

    CVector2D vectorRes(    cosf(fThetaRadian)* fNewX - sinf(fThetaRadian)* fNewY,
                            sinf(fThetaRadian)* fNewX + cosf(fThetaRadian)* fNewY);
    vectorRes += vector;
    return vectorRes;
}
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You could save the cosf and sinf results to variables to use half as many trig function calls. :) –  Justin Ardini Jul 2 '10 at 1:28
    
good catch..... –  YeenFei Jul 2 '10 at 1:31
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