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Suppose I am using Google's Gson library to parse JSON into Java data structures.

Is there an easy way to throw an exception if there is a Java field that has no corresponding JSON? That is, I wish to require the JSON to have all the fields in the Java structure.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Gson doesn't have a JSON schema validation feature to specify that a particular element must be present, and it doesn't have a way to specify that a Java member must be populated. It might be nice to have such a feature available, such as with an @Required annotation. Head on over to the Gson Issues List and put in an enhancement request.

With Gson, you could enforce that specified JSON elements are present with a custom deserializer.

// output: 
//   [MyObject: element1=value1, element2=value2, element3=value3]
//   [MyObject: element1=value1, element2=value2, element3=null]
//   Exception in thread "main" com.google.gson.JsonParseException: Required Field Not Found: element2

import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.GsonBuilder;
import com.google.gson.JsonDeserializationContext;
import com.google.gson.JsonDeserializer;
import com.google.gson.JsonElement;
import com.google.gson.JsonObject;
import com.google.gson.JsonParseException;

public class Foo
{
  static String jsonInput1 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element2\":\"value2\",\"element3\":\"value3\"}";
  static String jsonInput2 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element2\":\"value2\"}";
  static String jsonInput3 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element3\":\"value3\"}";

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    GsonBuilder gsonBuilder = new GsonBuilder();
    MyDeserializer deserializer = new MyDeserializer();
    deserializer.registerRequiredField("element2");
    gsonBuilder.registerTypeAdapter(MyObject.class, deserializer);
    Gson gson = gsonBuilder.create();
    MyObject object1 = gson.fromJson(jsonInput1, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object1);
    MyObject object2 = gson.fromJson(jsonInput2, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object2);
    MyObject object3 = gson.fromJson(jsonInput3, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object3);
  }
}

class MyObject
{
  String element1;
  String element2;
  String element3;

  @Override
  public String toString()
  {
    return String.format(
        "[MyObject: element1=%s, element2=%s, element3=%s]",
        element1, element2, element3);
  }
}

class MyDeserializer implements JsonDeserializer<MyObject>
{
  List<String> requiredFields = new ArrayList<String>();

  void registerRequiredField(String fieldName)
  {
    requiredFields.add(fieldName);
  }

  @Override
  public MyObject deserialize(JsonElement json, Type typeOfT, JsonDeserializationContext context)
      throws JsonParseException
  {
    JsonObject jsonObject = (JsonObject) json;
    for (String fieldName : requiredFields)
    {
      if (jsonObject.get(fieldName) == null)
      {
        throw new JsonParseException("Required Field Not Found: " + fieldName);
      }
    }
    return new Gson().fromJson(json, MyObject.class);
  }
}

A preferable approach might be to use an API that provides JSON Schema validation. Jackson has at least a rudimentary implementation available. JSON Tools looks to have a more mature one.

Here's an example with Jackson.

// output: 
// Validating jsonInput1...
// Validating jsonInput2...
// Validating jsonInput3...
// $.element2: is missing and it is not optional
// [MyObject: element1=value1, element2=value2, element3=value3]
// [MyObject: element1=value1, element2=value2, element3=null]
// [MyObject: element1=value1, element2=null, element3=value3]

import java.util.List;

import org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper;

import eu.vahlas.json.schema.JSONSchema;
import eu.vahlas.json.schema.JSONSchemaProvider;
import eu.vahlas.json.schema.impl.JacksonSchemaProvider;

public class Foo
{
  static String jsonSchema = 
    "{" + 
        "\"description\":\"Serialized MyObject Specification\"," + 
        "\"type\":[\"object\"]," + 
        "\"properties\":" + 
        "{" + 
            "\"element1\":{\"type\":\"string\"}," + 
            "\"element2\":{\"type\":\"string\",\"optional\":false}," + 
            "\"element3\":{\"type\":\"string\",\"optional\":true}" + 
        "}" + 
    "}";;

  static String jsonInput1 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element2\":\"value2\",\"element3\":\"value3\"}";
  static String jsonInput2 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element2\":\"value2\"}";
  static String jsonInput3 = "{\"element1\":\"value1\",\"element3\":\"value3\"}";

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
  {
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    JSONSchemaProvider schemaProvider = new JacksonSchemaProvider(mapper);
    JSONSchema schema = schemaProvider.getSchema(jsonSchema);

    System.out.println("Validating jsonInput1...");
    validateAndLogErrors(jsonInput1, schema);
    System.out.println("Validating jsonInput2...");
    validateAndLogErrors(jsonInput2, schema);
    System.out.println("Validating jsonInput3...");
    validateAndLogErrors(jsonInput3, schema);

    MyObject object1 = mapper.readValue(jsonInput1, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object1);
    MyObject object2 = mapper.readValue(jsonInput2, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object2);
    MyObject object3 = mapper.readValue(jsonInput3, MyObject.class);
    System.out.println(object3);
  }

  static void validateAndLogErrors(String jsonInput, JSONSchema schema)
  {
    List<String> errors = schema.validate(jsonInput);
    for (String error : errors)
    {
      System.out.println(error);
    }
  }
}

class MyObject
{
  String element1;
  String element2;
  String element3;

  void setElement1(String element1)
  {
    this.element1 = element1;
  }

  void setElement2(String element2)
  {
    this.element2 = element2;
  }

  void setElement3(String element3)
  {
    this.element3 = element3;
  }

  @Override
  public String toString()
  {
    return String.format(
        "[MyObject: element1=%s, element2=%s, element3=%s]",
        element1, element2, element3);
  }
}
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2  
Although your proposed gson solution works when you create the type by another gson instance, it does not work when reusing the same context. It causes an infinite loop. By creating a new gson you lose other configuration options your original gson had. –  Moritz Aug 29 '11 at 10:34

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