Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a database table containing credit card records. One of the fields is a Date field. I would like to update this field by changing the year portion of the date to 2011 if the year is less than 2010. From what i have found, PLSQL has functions for time and months but nothing to do with years (to my knowledge).

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This shows how to

with cc as(
select to_date('12-jan-1999') as cdate from dual union all
select to_date('12-jan-1921') as cdate from dual union all
select to_date('12-jan-1900') as cdate from dual union all
select to_date('12-jan-2000') as cdate from dual union all
select to_date('12-jan-2010') as cdate from dual
)
select  to_date( to_char(cdate,'DD-MON')  ||'-2011','DD-MON-YYYY')
from cc
where cdate < to_date('01-JAN-2010','DD-MON-YYYY')
/
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. I like this very much. Give me a few minutes to test it. –  jake Jul 2 '10 at 8:45
    
This will break one day a year on leap years. ADD_MONTHS is a more robust solution. –  Allan Jul 2 '10 at 17:30

1 year = 12 months, so subtract 12 months:

select add_months(sysdate,-12) from dual
share|improve this answer

Here's how to do it so it works with leap years using add_months.

with cc as( 
select to_date('12-jan-1999','dd-mon-yyyy') as cdate from dual union all 
select to_date('12-jan-1921','dd-mon-yyyy') as cdate from dual union all 
select to_date('29-feb-1904','dd-mon-yyyy') as cdate from dual union all 
select to_date('12-jan-2000','dd-mon-yyyy') as cdate from dual union all 
select to_date('12-jan-2010','dd-mon-yyyy') as cdate from dual 
) 
select add_months(cdate,(2011 - extract( year from cdate)) * 12)  
from cc 
where cdate < to_date('01-JAN-2010','DD-MON-YYYY');
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.