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I've been reading and doing some testing and found that the command. "Length" of the Array () javascript does not work when the array's keys are string. I found that to run this command, I use whole keys.

However, I wonder if any of you can tell me why this rule? Limitation of language, or specification of logic? Or, my mistake ...?

Thanks

Obs.: The key to my array is a string (name of component) but the values and the array of objects.

Declarating:

objElementos = new Array();

Object:

objElemento = function(Id){
this.Id        = $('#' + Id).attr('id');
this.Name      = $('#' + Id).attr('name');
this.CssLeft   = $('#' + Id).css('left');
this.CssBottom = $('#' + Id).css('bottom');
this.Parent    = $('#' + Id).parent().get(0);
this.Childs    = new Array();

this.addChild = function(IdObjChild) {
    try {
        if ($('#' + IdObjChild).attr('id') != '')
            this.Childs[$('#' + IdObjChild).attr('id')] = new objElemento(IdObjChild);
    } catch(err){ $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>' + err + '</p>'); }
}

this.getChildCount = function(){
    try {
        $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>' + this.Childs.length + '</p>');
        return this.Childs.length;
    } catch(err){ $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>' + err + '</p>'); }
}

this.updateCssLeft = function(CssPosition){
    try {
        $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>updateCssLeft:' + this.Id + ' / ' + this.CssLeft + '</p>');

        $('#' + this.Id).css('left',CssPosition);
        this.CssLeft = $('#' + this.Id).css('left');

        $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>updateCssLeft:' + this.Id + ' / ' + this.CssLeft + '</p>');         
    } catch(err){ $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>' + err + '</p>'); }
}

this.updateCssBottom = function(CssPosition){
    try {
        $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>updateCssBottom:' + this.Id + ' / ' + this.CssBottom + '</p>');

        $('#' + this.Id).css('bottom',CssPosition);
        this.CssBottom = $('#' + this.Id).css('bottom');

        $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>updateCssBottom:' + this.Id + ' / ' + this.CssBottom + '</p>');
    } catch(err){ $('#divErrors').prepend('<p>' + err + '</p>'); }
}
  }

Use:

objElementos['snaptarget'] = new objElemento('snaptarget');
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When using string "indexers" on an array, you are effectively treating it as an object and not an array, and tacking extra fields onto that object. If you are not using integer indexes, then there's not really much point in using the Array type and it makes more sense to use the Object type instead. You could count the fields as follows:

var c=0;
for(var fieldName in obj)
{
    c++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be the only language that treats the array like this then, correct? I have heard that javascript is quite incomplete in object orientation. @spender –  Ph.E Jul 2 '10 at 12:10
    
I'm not sure many other languages would allow use of a string to index an array (although the term index here is misapplied). It's more a job for Dictionary type collections. –  spender Jul 2 '10 at 12:11
    
now I'm declaring an array of objects, and adding elements (objects) to it. Otherwise there would be more correct to do this? - Code above. @spender –  Ph.E Jul 2 '10 at 12:13
1  
@Ph.E – I wouldn't consider JavaScript's implementation of OOP as incomplete; it's just different, as it's a Prototype-based language, opposed to Class-based. –  Marcel Korpel Jul 2 '10 at 12:38
    
Nice! Thanks by responding @Marcel Korpel. –  Ph.E Jul 2 '10 at 18:05

The reason is because when you are using strings as your keys, you're really declaring an object, rather than an array. As such, there is no length attribute for objects.

share|improve this answer
    
They are all telling me that. Thanks. @Mike Sherov –  Ph.E Jul 2 '10 at 12:22

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