Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code similar to the following:

try {
    HttpPost post = new HttpPost(httpsUrl);
    setHeaders(post);

    HttpEntity entity = new StringEntity(request, "UTF-8");

    post.setEntity(entity);

    HttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(post);
    String result = EntityReader.readContent(response.getEntity());
    checkAnswer(result);
    return result;

} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new ZapException("Error executing the http post request: "+e.getMessage(), e);
}

It sends the content of request to a server via POST using a httpclient instance that might have already been used before (it has persistent connections turned on, since we're sending quite some requests to the same server...).

This sometimes fails with a SocketTimeoutException with "Read timed out" as the message. It's not clear to us, why it only fails at some times, when most times it doesn't. What gives?

share|improve this question
    
I have a similiar problem when sending multiple requests to solr w/ tomcat 7. what are you sending the requests to? what are the details of your server since thats where the errors originate from –  Steve May 23 '11 at 5:01
    
I think it was Jetty 6. But that was quite a while back... –  kungfoo May 23 '11 at 10:55

1 Answer 1

In the following, I assume you are using Apache Commons HttpClient (org.apache.commons.httpclient.HttpClient).

Maybe you get thrown a SocketTimeoutException simply because, occasionally, the host your HttpClient instance is communicating with takes too long to respond, triggering HttpClient's cancellation routine. You can increase the connection timeout and the socket timeout with the following

HttpConnectionParams params = httpclient.getHttpConnectionManager().getParams();
params.setConnectionTimeout(20000);
params.setSoTimeout(15000);

Aditionally, if you still face timeouts despite increasing the timeout limits, it is a good practice to handle the SocketTimeoutException gracefully - for example by retrying the connection a second and third time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.