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I basically have multiple events signals which I want to connect to the same slot. What I want to know is how can I pass string based paramters to that same slot so that the slot knows which is this signal coming from. One alternative is to make as many slots as there are signals and then connect them in a 1:1 manner, but this is efficient, considering that the code for all the processing is very similar. I tried doing this but I'm getting some errors:

connect(selecter1,SIGNAL(selected(QString)),this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString)));
connect(button1,SIGNAL(clicked()),this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade("button1")));
connect(button2,SIGNAL(clicked()),this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade("button2")));

The error is related to the parameters I'm passing in the last 2 commands .. And backgroundTypeChoiceMade is declared like this:

void backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString);

Can someone tell me what the error is in the above code ?

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6 Answers 6

You can use QSignalMapper. Although the QSignalMapper is the answer to your question, I think jon hanson's answer is the way you should take. You get much more cleaner code that way.

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I think in this case QSignalMapper is the way to go. Imagine changing buttons to QComboBox or any other UI change. With QSignalMapper, trivial change in a .cpp file. With separate slots, class signature change needed. –  hyde Dec 14 '13 at 7:03

What is inefficient about using separate slots? If there's commonality in the slot handlers then move that into a function, e.g. extending ereOn's example:

void YourClass::YourClass() :
  m_button1(new QPushButton()),
  m_button2(new QPushButton())
{
  connect(m_button1, SIGNAL(clicked()), this, SLOT(yourSlot1()));
  connect(m_button2, SIGNAL(clicked()), this, SLOT(yourSlot2()));
}

void YourClass::common(int n)
{
}

void YourClass::yourSlot1()
{
    common (1);
}

void YourClass::yourSlot2()
{
    common (2);
}
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I totally agree with that. –  ereOn Jul 2 '10 at 13:58
    
Imagine if UI needs to be changed in arbitrary way, and compare needed code changes with this approach and QSignalMapper approach. –  hyde Dec 14 '13 at 7:05
    
And what if your UI changes at runtime? No way, José. –  Nolan Apr 3 at 17:18
    
But if your UI is static, then yeah, sure, this is good. –  Nolan Apr 3 at 17:24

You can't pass constants to connect() because the effective parameters are deduced at execution time, not compile time.

However, while this is against the OO principle, you can use QObject::sender() which gives a pointer to the emitter QObject.

Example below:

void YourClass::YourClass() :
  m_button1(new QPushButton()),
  m_button2(new QPushButton())
{
  connect(m_button1, SIGNAL(clicked()), this, SLOT(yourSlot()));
  connect(m_button2, SIGNAL(clicked()), this, SLOT(yourSlot()));
}

void YourClass::yourSlot()
{
  if ((QPushButton* button = dynamic_cast<QPushButton*>(sender()))
  {
    // Now button points to a QPushButton* that you can compare with the pointers you already have

    if (button == m_button1)
    {
      // Whatever
    } else
    if (button == m_button2)
    {
      // Whatever
    }
  }
}

If you have many buttons, you may also use a QSignalMapper by providing an identifier for each button.

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1  
One could also use the objectName-property: doc.trolltech.com/4.5/qobject.html#objectName-prop –  Magnus Hoff Jul 2 '10 at 13:37

Four methods. One doesn't suck.

  1. QSignalMapper. Works, but makes for messy code.
  2. Named slots. Messy for any significant number of senders, and doesn't work for dynamically-generated senders (e.g., buttons in a list).
  3. sender()-compare. Can handle dynamic senders, but is still kinda ugly.
  4. Subclass the sender. Doesn't suck. Gives you what you really wanted all along: parameterized signals.

Especially when you're using a small number of signals and sender types and when the senders are dynamically generated, subclassing the sender is the cleanest way. This lets you overload the existing signals to contain whatever parameters you need.

And now, wiring up the signals and slots just works:

Keypad::Keypad(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        // KeypadButton keeps track of the identifier you give it
        buttons[i] = new KeypadButton(i, this);
        // And passes it as a signal parameter. Booyah.
        connect(buttons[i], SIGNAL(clicked(int)), this, SIGNAL(digitClicked(int)));
    }
    createLayout();
}

void Keypad::digitClicked(int digit)
{
    // The slot can find the clicked button with ease:
    dial(button[i]); // or whatever
    //...
}

and the extra code is out-of-sight in a subclass you'll never have to touch again.

See http://doc.qt.digia.com/qq/qq10-signalmapper.html#thesubclassapproach for an example implementation of subclassing QPushButton to emit clicked(int) signals. Also discusses all four methods - named slots ("the trivial solution"), sender(), subclassing, and signal mapper.

Caveat: Obviously works best for small numbers of sender types. But that's usually the case. And in that case, it's worth it.

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1  
I think you should avoid QSignalMapper every time you (reasonably) can. The best solutions (which lead to cleaner code) are: 1) subclass and send your desired ID in the signal as @Foamy wrote. We use this in our Qt project whenever we can (but it's not a good idea to subclass just to do it) And 2) get the sender() in your slot, typecheck it and compare with whatever ID/tag you want and the sender has. –  Viktor Benei May 30 '12 at 14:54
    
@ViktorBenei I agree, except I do think it's worth it to subclass just for parameterized signals. It's a little more work in subclassing, but keeps the rest of your code that much cleaner. –  Nolan Apr 3 at 17:19

You can use something like I posted on my blog: http://uint32t.blogspot.com/2008/11/using-boost-bind-and-boost-function.html

I think one of the comments has a pretty good solution as well.

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If you really don't want to use QSignalMapper, you could do something like this:

class SignalForwarderWithString: public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    SignalForwarderWithString(QString data = "", QObject *parent = 0) : QObject(parent), _data(data) {}
    QString _data;
signals:
    void forward(QString);
public slots:
    void receive() { emit forward(_data); }
};

...
connect(selecter1,SIGNAL(selected(QString)),this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString)));

SignalForwarderWithString *sfws;
sfws = new SignalForwarderWithString("button1", this);
connect(button1,SIGNAL(clicked()), sfws, SLOT(receive(QString)));
connect(sfws, SIGNAL(forward(QString)), this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString)));

sfws = new SignalForwarderWithString("button2", this);
connect(button2,SIGNAL(clicked()), sfws, SLOT(receive(QString)));
connect(sfws, SIGNAL(forward(QString)), this,SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString)));

but QSignalMapper is just as easy...

QSignalMapper *mapper = new QSignalMapper(this);
connect(button1, SIGNAL(clicked()), mapper, SLOT(map()));
mapper->setMapping(button1, "button 1");
connect(button2, SIGNAL(clicked()), mapper, SLOT(map()));
mapper->setMapping(button2, "button 2");
// you might have to tweak the argument type for your slot...
connect(mapper, SIGNAL(mapped(const QString &), this, SLOT(backgroundTypeChoiceMade(QString)));
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