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i made a program to convert lowercase strings to upper case like strupr(); in strings.h ..its printing some ascii code when ever i run the program

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void xstrupr(char string[]);

void main(void)
{
    char string[40];
    puts("Enter string:");
    gets(string);
    xstrupr(string);
    printf(" %s ",string);
    getch();
}

void xstrupr(char string[])
{
    int i;
    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
        if ((string[i]>='a')&&(string[i]<='z') )
            string[i]+=64;
        else
            if(string[i]=='\0')
                break;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
there's a button with 101/010 ... select your code and click it!! –  ShinTakezou Jul 2 '10 at 16:02
1  
why do you always make other SO users format your code? –  Cogwheel Jul 2 '10 at 16:04
    
Are you reinventing the wheel on purpose? If not, shouldn't you use toupper()? –  Piskvor Jul 2 '10 at 16:27
    
i will be asked to make the builtin functions myself in the examination so i am trying to make them on my own –  Fahad Uddin Jul 2 '10 at 16:46
1  
Why don't you tell use what you entered in your test case, and what you got out? –  David Thornley Jul 2 '10 at 18:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks to me like you're trying to do this at the most basic level. That being said, you're making one erroneous assumption.

You don't get the uppercase version of a letter by adding 64 to it. Moreover, just supplying a magic number is unclear and may be wrong on another character set.

Try changing string[i] += 64; to string[i] += 'A' - 'a';. That will work on all character sets where there's a constant difference between uppercase and lowercase letters.

Now, this will fail in some cases. For example, in EBCDIC, the letters are not contiguous, so the range from 'a' to 'z' is not all alphabetic. This is why, in real code, you use standard features like isalpha() and toupper(), but this is good as an exercise.

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Actually in ASCII Chart Ranges are as follows:

  • A to Z: 65 to 90
  • a to z: 97 to 122

Your edited program is like that:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void xstrupr(char string[]);

void main(void)
{
    char string[40];
    puts("Enter string:");
    gets(string);
    xstrupr(string);
    printf(" %s ",string);
    getch();
}

void xstrupr(char string[])
{
    int i;
    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
    if ((string[i]>='a')&&(string[i]<='z') )
        string[i]-=32;
    else
        if(string[i]=='\0')
        break;
    }
}

See the ascii table below:

ASCII Table


Sources:

Image is taken from http://www.unitechnical.info/

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First, the difference in ASCII value between uppercase and lowercase letters is 32, not 64.

Second, and most important, the C library provides tolower() and toupper() functions, which work not only on ASCII, but in whatever encoding you are currently using.

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You're returning an integer (either 0 or i-64) and treating it like it was a pointer to a null terminated string. I'm not surprised it prints junk.

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1  
It's only 0 if there are no lower case letters in string. Otherwise it's i-64 where i is the index of the first lower case letter. –  sepp2k Jul 2 '10 at 16:08

This is horrible, if you don't mind me saying. Don't take this personally, of course.

  • Don't rely on ASCII values, never hardcode actual character values as literal numbers.
  • Don't use char variables as loop indices; they're typically too small.
  • Use islower() to check if a character is lower-case.
  • Use toupper() to convert it to upper-case.
  • Realize that code like this doesn't work for the majority of languages
  • Using wide characters is not enough either; some languages have words that change length (charactercount) when going from lowercase to upper.

My suggested implementation in this style would be:

#include <ctype.h>

void xstrup(char *string)
{
  for(; *string; string++)
    *string = toupper((unsigned char) *string);
}

Note that this is just a reasonable (in my opinion) implementation of what it looked like you wanted to achieve, it's not by any means perfect and does not address all of my complaints.

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1  
+1 on not using raw ASCII values. –  casablanca Jul 2 '10 at 16:10
1  
-1 on using toupper() with (possibly) signed char. –  Roland Illig Jul 2 '10 at 16:15
    
Why do you cast *string to (unsigned char)? That makes no sense. toupper is designed to take a char so give it a char. –  Zan Lynx Jul 2 '10 at 16:30
1  
@Because of Roland's comment. And no, toupper() is not designed to take a char as I remembered, it takes int. –  unwind Jul 2 '10 at 16:38
    
Yes, it takes an int with a value in the range of unsigned char. –  caf Jul 3 '10 at 3:27
  1. First, your function returns char. This is irrelevant.
  2. return would break from the function, not replace a character.
  3. This is completely wrong. Upr cannot be done on per-character basis. Example. Upr of the german eszett 'ß' is two characters, aka "SS". Assumping your char* input does not contain utf-8 is a 'text crime'.
share|improve this answer
    
While you're completely correct on your third point, that's out of scope. The C string and character functions were intended to work on a single-byte character set that didn't include characters like the eszett. (Even wide characters are fixed-width, and in many implementations 16-bit, meaning you have the inadequate UCS-2 implementation.) toupper() and tolower() operate on individual characters, and have no ability to either accept or emit two characters. This is a problem, but dealing with it is really outside the scope of the C standard library. –  David Thornley Jul 2 '10 at 18:19
    
I don't agree with the "out of scope" claim. UTF-8 should be considered the default for char*, and there's nothing in C standard against it. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jul 2 '10 at 19:29

The function exits when a lowcase character is encountered, instead it shall replace the current character.

Also the type returned by strupr() is wrong, it shouldn't be char. And it does not return the right thing. So it certainly outputs garbage.

[I don't give you all the details since you seem to be learnig, feel free to ask for more].

share|improve this answer
    
can any 1 help me this code :( –  Fahad Uddin Jul 2 '10 at 16:53
1  
@fahad: I tried to help, without giving you the solution, explaining you errors in your code. Why did you our that return statement when a lowercase char in met ? The function shall be able to convert several chars. Do you know how to make the replacement ? Also do you know you're supposed to vote for the [good] answers you're getting ? You never voted. –  philant Jul 2 '10 at 19:47

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