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Let's say I have a GridViewEx class declared which extends GridView. And inside that class, I have a delegate declared called GetDataPage. So it look like this:

public class GridViewEx : GridView
{
    public delegate object GetDataPageDelegate(int pageIndex, int pageSize, string sortExpression,
        IList<FilterItem> filterItems);

    [Browsable(true), Category("NewDynamic")]
    [Description("Method used to fetch the data for this grid")]
    public GetDataPageDelegate GetDataPage
    {
        get
        {
            return ViewState["pgv_getgriddata"] as GetDataPageDelegate;
        }
        set
        {
            ViewState["pgv_getgriddata"] = value;
        }
    }

    // ... other parts of class omitted
}

This works ok and does what I want. But what I would like to be able to do is in the markup for the GridViewEx, be able to set this delegate, like so:

<div style="margin-top: 20px;">
    <custom:GridViewEx ID="gridView" runat="server" SkinID="GridViewEx" Width="40%" AllowSorting="true"
        VirtualItemCount="-1" AllowPaging="true" GetDataPage="Helper.GetDataPage">
    </custom:GridViewEx>
</div>

However, I get this error:

Error 1 Cannot create an object of type 'GUI.Controls.GridViewEx+GetDataPageDelegate' from its string representation 'Helper.GetDataPage' for the 'GetDataPage' property.

I guess it's not possible to set it via markup, but I just wondered. It's easy enough to set the delegate in code, but I was just trying to learn something new. Thanks for any help.

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just a question, but does the object you are providing for the delegate require arguments in its constructor? Maybe something around that area is causing your problem. –  AJ. Jul 2 '10 at 16:38
    
I don't think the constructor would affect it. I think it's probably just not possible to set a delegate with markup, but I figured I'd ask here just to be sure :). –  dcp Jul 2 '10 at 16:47
    
First of all there is no point in using viewstate if you are defining it's value in markup. Viewstate is used if you are dynamically setting values, like binding them from a datasource. Where are you calling GetDataPage? –  Jeroen Jul 2 '10 at 18:33
    
@Joroen - Good point about the viewstate. I am calling GetDataPage from inside the GridViewEx's DataBind method. –  dcp Jul 2 '10 at 18:56
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you really want to do is expose an event. Add:

public event GetDataPageDelegate GettingDataPage

Then in your markup you'll be able to say:

<custom:GridViewEx ID="gridView" runat="server" SkinID="GridViewEx" Width="40%" AllowSorting="true" 
    VirtualItemCount="-1" AllowPaging="true" OnGettingDataPage="Helper.GetDataPage"> 
</custom:GridViewEx>

By "raising" the event in your DataBind method as such:

if(GettingDataPage!=null)
   GettingDataPage(pageIndex,pageSize,sortExpression,filterItems);

However, I would follow the pattern of events and create a new object:

public class GettingDataPageEventArgs : EventArgs
{
   public int PageIndex{get;set;}
   public int PageSize{get;set;}
   public string SortExpression{get;set;}
   public IList<FilterItem> FilterList{get;set;}
}

and change your delegate to

public delegate void GettingDataPageEventHandler(object sender, GettingDataPageEventArgs);
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