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I have a unit test (nUnit). Many layers down the call stack a method will fail if it is running via a unit test.

Ideally you would use something like mocking to setup the object that this method is depending on but this is 3rd party code and I can't do that without a lot of work.

I don't want setup nUnit specific methods - there are too many levels here and its a poor way of doing unit test.

Instead what I would like to do is to add something like this deep down in the call stack

#IF DEBUG // Unit tests only included in debug build
if (IsRunningInUnitTest)
   {
   // Do some setup to avoid error
   }
#endif

So any ideas about how to write IsRunningInUnitTest?

P.S. I am fully aware that this is not great design, but I think its better than the alternatives.

share|improve this question
5  
You should not be directly or indirectly testing third-party code in a unit test. You should isolate your method under test from the third-party implementation. – Craig Stuntz Jul 2 '10 at 16:54
1  
Yes - I realise that - in an idea world, but sometimes we've got to be a bit pragmatic about things no? – Ryan Jul 2 '10 at 16:59
2  
Coming back to Craig's comment - not sure thats true. If my method relies upon the 3rd party library behaving in a certain way then shouldn't this be part of the test? If the 3rd party app changes I want my test to fail. If you're using mocks your testing against how you think the 3rd party app works, not how it actually does. – Ryan Jul 2 '10 at 18:01
1  
Ryan, you can test assumptions about the third party behavior, but that's a separate test. You need to test your own code in isolation. – Craig Stuntz Jul 2 '10 at 18:42
1  
I do get what your saying but for anything but a trivial example you would be talking about an large (huge) amount of work and there is nothing to ensure that the assumptions your checking in your test are the same as your assumptions in your actual methods. Hmm - debate for a blog post I think, I'll shoot you an email when I've got my thoughts together. – Ryan Jul 2 '10 at 20:05

12 Answers 12

up vote 45 down vote accepted

I've done this before - I had to hold my nose while I did it, but I did it. Pragmatism beats dogmatism every time. Of course, if there is a nice way you can refactor to avoid it, that would be great.

Basically I had a "UnitTestDetector" class which checked whether the NUnit framework assembly was loaded in the current AppDomain. It only needed to do this once, then cache the result. Ugly, but simple and effective.

share|improve this answer
    
any sample about UnitTestDetector? and similar for MSTest ? – Kiquenet Jun 5 '13 at 8:56
1  
@Kiquenet: I think I'd just use AppDomain.GetAssemblies and check for the relevant assembly - for MSTest you'd need to look at which assemblies are loaded. Look at Ryan's answer for an example. – Jon Skeet Jun 5 '13 at 9:14

Taking Jon's idea this is what I came up with -

using System;
using System.Reflection;

/// <summary>
/// Detect if we are running as part of a nUnit unit test.
/// This is DIRTY and should only be used if absolutely necessary 
/// as its usually a sign of bad design.
/// </summary>    
static class UnitTestDetector
{

    private static bool _runningFromNUnit = false;      

    static UnitTestDetector()
    {
        foreach (Assembly assem in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies())
        {
            // Can't do something like this as it will load the nUnit assembly
            // if (assem == typeof(NUnit.Framework.Assert))

            if (assem.FullName.ToLowerInvariant().StartsWith("nunit.framework"))
            {
                _runningFromNUnit = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    public static bool IsRunningFromNUnit
    {
        get { return _runningFromNUnit; }
    }
}

Pipe down at the back we're all big enough boys to recognise when we're doing something we probably shouldn't ;)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good answer. This can be simplified quite a bit though, see below: stackoverflow.com/a/30356080/184528 – cdiggins May 20 '15 at 17:05
    
The particular project that I wrote this for was (and still is!) .NET 2.0 so no linq. – Ryan May 21 '15 at 10:23

Adapted from Ryan's answer. This one is for the MS unit test framework.

The reason I need this is because I show a MessageBox on errors. But my unit tests also test the error handling code, and I don't want a MessageBox to pop up when running unit tests.

/// <summary>
/// Detects if we are running inside a unit test.
/// </summary>
public static class UnitTestDetector
{
    static UnitTestDetector()
    {
        string testAssemblyName = "Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework";
        UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
            .Any(a => a.FullName.StartsWith(testAssemblyName));
    }

    public static bool IsInUnitTest { get; private set; }
}

And here's a unit test for it:

    [TestMethod]
    public void IsInUnitTest()
    {
        Assert.IsTrue(UnitTestDetector.IsInUnitTest, 
            "Should detect that we are running inside a unit test."); // lol
    }
share|improve this answer
6  
I have a better way that solves your MessageBox problem and voids this hack and delivers more unit test cases. I use a class that implements an interface I call ICommonDialogs. The implementation class displays all pop up dialogs (MessageBox, File dialogs, Color picker, database connection dialog etc). Classes that need to display message boxes accept ICommonDiaglogs as a constructor parameter that we can then mock in the unit test. Bonus: You can assert on expected MessageBox calls. – Tony O'Hagan May 1 '12 at 4:31
1  
@Tony, good idea. That's clearly the best way to do it. I don't know what I was thinking at the time. I think dependency injection was still new to me at that time. – dan-gph Jan 16 '13 at 8:09
1  
Seriously, people, learn about dependency injection, and secondarily, mock objects. Dependency injection will revolutionize your programming. – dan-gph Jun 25 '14 at 0:46

In test mode, Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() seems to be null.

#IF DEBUG // Unit tests only included in debug build 
  if (Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() == null)    
  {
    // Do some setup to avoid error    
  }
#endif 

Note that if Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() is null, Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly() isn't.

The documentation says: The GetEntryAssembly method can return null when a managed assembly has been loaded from an unmanaged application.

share|improve this answer

Maybe useful, checking current ProcessName:

public static bool UnitTestMode
{
    get 
    { 
        string processName = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName;

        return processName == "VSTestHost"
                || processName.StartsWith("vstest.executionengine") //it can be vstest.executionengine.x86 or vstest.executionengine.x86.clr20
                || processName.StartsWith("QTAgent");   //QTAgent32 or QTAgent32_35
    }
}

And this function should be also check by unittest:

[TestClass]
public class TestUnittestRunning
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void UnitTestRunningTest()
    {
        Assert.IsTrue(MyTools.UnitTestMode);
    }
}

References:
Matthew Watson in http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharplanguage/thread/11e68468-c95e-4c43-b02b-7045a52b407e/

share|improve this answer

I use a similar approach as tallseth

This is the basic code which could be easily modified to include caching. Another good idea would be to add a setter to IsRunningInUnitTest and call UnitTestDetector.IsRunningInUnitTest = false to your projects main entry point to avoid the code execution.

public static class UnitTestDetector
{
    public static readonly HashSet<string> UnitTestAttributes = new HashSet<string> 
    {
        "Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting.TestClassAttribute",
        "NUnit.Framework.TestFixtureAttribute",
    };
    public static bool IsRunningInUnitTest
    {
        get
        {
            foreach (var f in new StackTrace().GetFrames())
                if (f.GetMethod().DeclaringType.GetCustomAttributes(false).Any(x => UnitTestAttributes.Contains(x.GetType().FullName)))
                    return true;
            return false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach more than the higher-voted answers. I don't think it's safe to assume that unit test assemblies will only ever be loaded during a unit test and the process name can also vary from developer to developer (eg. some use the R# test runner). – E M Oct 2 '15 at 13:11

I use this only for skipping logic that disables all TraceAppenders in log4net during startup when no debugger is attached. This allows unit tests to log to the Resharper results window even when running in non-debug mode.

The method that uses this function is either called on startup of the application or when beginning a test fixture.

It is similar to Ryan's post but uses LINQ, drops the System.Reflection requirement, does not cache the result, and is private to prevent (accidental) misuse.

    private static bool IsNUnitRunning()
    {
        return AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().Any(assembly => assembly.FullName.ToLowerInvariant().StartsWith("nunit.framework"));
    }
share|improve this answer

Simplifying Ryan's solution, you can just add the following static property to any class:

    public static readonly bool IsRunningFromNUnit = 
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().Any(
            a => a.FullName.ToLowerInvariant().StartsWith("nunit.framework"));
share|improve this answer
    
Pretty much the same as dan-gph's answer (though that was looking for the VS toolset, not nunit). – Ryan May 21 '15 at 10:22

I was unhappy to have this problem recently. I solved it in a slightly different way. First, I was unwilling to make the assumption that nunit framework would never be loaded outside a test environment; I was particularly worried about developers running the app on their machines. So I walked the call stack instead. Second, I was able to make the assumption that test code would never be run against release binaries, so I made sure this code did not exist in a release system.

internal abstract class TestModeDetector
{
    internal abstract bool RunningInUnitTest();

    internal static TestModeDetector GetInstance()
    {
    #if DEBUG
        return new DebugImplementation();
    #else
        return new ReleaseImplementation();
    #endif
    }

    private class ReleaseImplementation : TestModeDetector
    {
        internal override bool RunningInUnitTest()
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    private class DebugImplementation : TestModeDetector
    {
        private Mode mode_;

        internal override bool RunningInUnitTest()
        {
            if (mode_ == Mode.Unknown)
            {
                mode_ = DetectMode();
            }

            return mode_ == Mode.Test;
        }

        private Mode DetectMode()
        {
            return HasUnitTestInStack(new StackTrace()) ? Mode.Test : Mode.Regular;
        }

        private static bool HasUnitTestInStack(StackTrace callStack)
        {
            return GetStackFrames(callStack).SelectMany(stackFrame => stackFrame.GetMethod().GetCustomAttributes(false)).Any(NunitAttribute);
        }

        private static IEnumerable<StackFrame> GetStackFrames(StackTrace callStack)
        {
            return callStack.GetFrames() ?? new StackFrame[0];
        }

        private static bool NunitAttribute(object attr)
        {
            var type = attr.GetType();
            if (type.FullName != null)
            {
                return type.FullName.StartsWith("nunit.framework", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
            }
            return false;
        }

        private enum Mode
        {
            Unknown,
            Test,
            Regular
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I find the idea of testing the debug version while shipping the release version to be a bad idea in general. – Patrick M Jun 8 '15 at 6:37

Somewhere in the project being tested:

public static class Startup
{
    public static bool IsRunningInUnitTest { get; set; }
}

Somewhere in your unit test project:

[TestClass]
public static class AssemblyInitializer
{
    [AssemblyInitialize]
    public static void Initialize(TestContext context)
    {
        Startup.IsRunningInUnitTest = true;
    }
}

Elegant, no. But straightforward and fast. AssemblyInitialize is for MS Test. I would expect other test frameworks to have equivalents.

share|improve this answer
    
If the code you are testing creates additional AppDomains, IsRunningInUnitTest doesn't get set to true in those AppDomains. – Edward Brey Jul 16 '15 at 1:41

works like a charm

if (AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().FirstOrDefault(x => x.FullName.ToLowerInvariant().StartsWith("nunit.framework")) != null)
{
    fileName = @"C:\Users\blabla\xxx.txt";
}
else
{
    var sfd = new SaveFileDialog
    {     ...     };
    var dialogResult = sfd.ShowDialog();
    if (dialogResult != DialogResult.OK)
        return;
    fileName = sfd.FileName;
}

.

share|improve this answer

There is a really simple solution as well when you are testing a class...

Simply give the class you are testing a property like this:

// For testing purposes to avoid running certain code in unit tests.
public bool thisIsUnitTest { get; set; }

Now your unit test can set the "thisIsUnitTest" boolean to true, so in the code you want to skip, add:

   if (thisIsUnitTest)
   {
       return;
   } 

Its easier and faster than inspecting the assemblies. Reminds me of Ruby On Rails where you'd look to see if you are in the TEST environment.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you were down-voted here because you're relying on the test itself to modify the class' behaviour. – Heliac Oct 30 '14 at 9:53
    
This is very Weak! – ProfK Feb 13 '15 at 6:51

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