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I'm developing a multilanguage software. As far as the application code goes, localizability is not an issue. We can use language specific resources and have all kinds of tools that work well with them.

But what is the best approach in defining a multilanguage database schema? Let's say we have a lot of tables (100 or more), and each table can have multiple columns that can be localized (most of nvarchar columns should be localizable). For instance one of the tables might hold product information:

CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT (
  NAME        NVARCHAR(50),
  DESCRIPTION NTEXT,
  PRICE       NUMBER(18, 2)
)

I can think of three approaches to support multilingual text in NAME and DESCRIPTION columns:

  1. Separate column for each language

    When we add a new language to the system, we must create additional columns to store the translated text, like this:

    CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT (
      NAME_EN        NVARCHAR(50),
      NAME_DE        NVARCHAR(50),
      NAME_SP        NVARCHAR(50),
      DESCRIPTION_EN NTEXT,
      DESCRIPTION_DE NTEXT,
      DESCRIPTION_SP NTEXT,
      PRICE          NUMBER(18,2)
    )
    
  2. Translation table with columns for each language

    Instead of storing translated text, only a foreign key to the translations table is stored. The translations table contains a column for each language.

    CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT (
      NAME_FK        int,
      DESCRIPTION_FK int,
      PRICE          NUMBER(18, 2)
    )
    
    CREATE TABLE T_TRANSLATION (
      TRANSLATION_ID,
      TEXT_EN NTEXT,
      TEXT_DE NTEXT,
      TEXT_SP NTEXT
    )
    
  3. Translation tables with rows for each language

    Instead of storing translated text, only a foreign key to the translations table is stored. The translations table contains only a key, and a separate table contains a row for each translation to a language.

    CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT (
      NAME_FK        int,
      DESCRIPTION_FK int,
      PRICE          NUMBER(18, 2)
    )
    
    CREATE TABLE T_TRANSLATION (
      TRANSLATION_ID
    )
    
    CREATE TABLE T_TRANSLATION_ENTRY (
      TRANSLATION_FK,
      LANGUAGE_FK,
      TRANSLATED_TEXT NTEXT
    )
    
    CREATE TABLE T_TRANSLATION_LANGUAGE (
      LANGUAGE_ID,
      LANGUAGE_CODE CHAR(2)
    )
    

There are pros and cons to each solution, and I would like to know what are your experiences with these approaches, what do you recommend and how would you go about designing a multilanguage database schema.

share|improve this question
6  
3  
You can check this link: gsdesign.ro/blog/multilanguage-database-design-approach although reading the comments is very helpful –  fareed namrouti Jan 18 '12 at 13:52
    
@qbeuek : I'm not able to even get the Third Approach.. :D –  rptwsthi Dec 14 '12 at 12:50
    
LANGUAGE_CODE are natural key, avoid LANGUAGE_ID. –  gavenkoa Jun 4 at 8:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The third option is the best, for a few reasons:

  • Doesn't require altering the database schema for new languages (and thus limiting code changes)
  • Doesn't require a lot of space for unimplemented languages or translations of a a particular item
  • Provides the most flexibility
  • You don't end up with sparse tables
  • You don't have to worry about null keys and checking that you're displaying an existing translation instead of some null entry.
  • If you change or expand your database to encompass other translatable items/things/etc you can use the same tables and system - this is very uncoupled from the rest of the data.
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1  
I agree, though personally I'd have a localised table for each main table, to allow foreign keys to be implemented. –  Neil Barnwell Dec 3 '08 at 11:58
1  
Although the third option is the most clean and sound implementation of the problem it is more complex then first one. I think displaying, editing, reporting the general version needs so much extra effort that it does not always acceptable. I have implemented both solutions, the simpler was enough when the users needed a read-only (sometimes missing) translation of the "main" application language. –  rics Oct 14 '09 at 7:40
7  
What if the product table contains several translated fields ? When retrieving products, you will have to do one additional join per translated field, which will result in severe performance issues. There is as well (IMO) additional complexity for insert/update/delete. The single advantage of this is the lower number of tables. I would go for the method proposed by SunWuKung : I think it's a good balance between performance, complexity, and maintenance issues. –  Frosty Z Jan 20 '11 at 10:08
    
@rics- I agree, well what do you suggest to ... ? –  Saber Amani Sep 8 '11 at 4:50
    
@Adam- I am confused, maybe I misunderstood. You suggested the third one, right? Please explain it in more detail how are relations between those tables gonna be ? You mean we have to implement Translation and TranslationEntry tables for each tables in DB ? –  Saber Amani Sep 8 '11 at 4:57

What do you think about having a related translation table for each translatable table?

CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT (pr_id int, PRICE NUMBER(18, 2))

CREATE TABLE T_PRODUCT_tr (pr_id INT FK, languagecode varchar, pr_name text, pr_descr text)

This way if you have multiple translatable column it would only require a single join to get it + since you are not autogenerating a translationid it may be easier to import items together with their related translations.

The negative side of this is that if you have a complex language fallback mechanism you may need to implement that for each translation table - if you are relying on some stored procedure to do that. If you do that from the app this will probably not be a problem.

Let me know what you think - I am also about to make a decision on this for our next application. So far we have used your 3rd type.

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1  
This option is similar to my option nr 1 but better. It is still hard to maintain and requires creating new tables for new languages, so I'd be reluctant to implement it. –  qbeuek Nov 27 '08 at 10:22
11  
it doesn't require a new table for a new language - you simply add a new row to the appropriate _tr table with your new language, you only need to create a new _tr table if you create a new translatable table –  SunWuKung Nov 27 '08 at 12:37
2  
i beleive that this is a good method. other methods require tons of left joins and when you are joining multiple tables that each of them have translation like 3 level deep, and each one has 3 fields you need 3*3 9 left joins only for translations.. other wise 3. Also it is easier to add constraints etc and i beleive searching is more resonable. –  Parhs May 1 '12 at 10:08
    
When T_PRODUCT has 1 million rows, T_PRODUCT_tr would have 2 million.Would it reduce sql efficiency much? –  Mithril Feb 14 at 3:22
    
@Mithril Either way you have 2 million rows. At least you don't need joins with this method. –  wrongstars Sep 8 at 11:50

I usually would go for this approach (not actual sql), this corresponds with your last option.

table Product
productid INT PK, price DECIMAL, translationid INT FK

table Translation
translationid INT PK

table TranslationItem
translationitemid INT PK, translationid INT FK, text VARCHAR, languagecode CHAR(2)

view ProductView
select * from Product
inner join Translation
inner join TranslationItem
where languagecode='en'

Because having all translatable texts in one place makes maintenance so much easier. Sometimes translations are outsourced to translation bureaus, this way you can send them just one big export file, and import it back just as easily.

share|improve this answer
    
Same remark as Adam Davis's answer. –  Frosty Z Jan 20 '11 at 10:10

Before going to technical details and solutions, you should stop for a minute and ask a few questions about the requirements. The answers can have a huge impact on the technical solution. Examples of such questions would be:
- Will all languages be used all the time?
- Who and when will fill the columns with the different language versions?
- What happens when a user will need a certain language of a text and there is none in the system?
- Only the texts are to be localized or there are also other items (for example PRICE can be stored in $ and € because they might be different)

share|improve this answer
    
I know that localization is a much broader topic and I am aware of the issues that you bring to my attention, but currently I am looking for an answer for a very specific problem of schema design. I assume that new languages will be added incrementally and each will be translated almost completely. –  qbeuek Nov 25 '08 at 11:36

I was looking for some tips for localization and found this topic. I was wondering why this is used:

CREATE TABLE T_TRANSLATION (
   TRANSLATION_ID
)

So you get something like user39603 suggests:

table Product
productid INT PK, price DECIMAL, translationid INT FK

table Translation
translationid INT PK

table TranslationItem
translationitemid INT PK, translationid INT FK, text VARCHAR, languagecode CHAR(2)

view ProductView
select * from Product
inner join Translation
inner join TranslationItem
where languagecode='en'

Can't you just leave the table Translation out so you get this:

    table Product
    productid INT PK, price DECIMAL

    table ProductItem
    productitemid INT PK, productid INT FK, text VARCHAR, languagecode CHAR(2)

    view ProductView
    select * from Product
    inner join ProductItem
    where languagecode='en'
share|improve this answer

Take a look for this example:

PRODUCTS (
    id   
    price
    created_at
)

LANGUAGES (
    id   
    title
)

TRANSLATIONS (
    id           (// id of translation, UNIQUE)
    language_id  (// id of desired language)
    table_name   (// any table, in this case PRODUCTS)
    item_id      (// id of item in PRODUCTS)
    field_name   (// fields to be translated)
    translation  (// translation text goes here)
)

I think there's no need to explain, the structure describes itself.

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I agree with randomizer. I don't see why you need a table "translation".

I think, this is enough:

TA_product: ProductID, ProductPrice
TA_Language: LanguageID, Language
TA_Productname: ProductnameID, ProductID, LanguageID, ProductName
share|improve this answer

Would the below approach be viable? Say you have tables where more than 1 column needs translating. So for product you could have both product name & product description that need translating. Could you do the following:

CREATE TABLE translation_entry (
      translation_id        int,
      language_id           int,
      table_name            nvarchar(200),
      table_column_name     nvarchar(200),
      table_row_id          bigint,
      translated_text       ntext
    )

    CREATE TABLE translation_language (
      id int,
      language_code CHAR(2)
    )   
share|improve this answer

"Which one is best" is based on the project situation. The first one is easy to select and maintain, and also the performance is best since it don't need to join tables when select entity. If you confirmed that your poject is just only support 2 or 3 languages, and it will not increase, you can use it.

The second one is okey but is hard to understand and maintain. And the performance is worse than first one.

The last one is good at scalability but bad at performance. The T_TRANSLATION_ENTRY table will become larger and larger, it's terrible when you want to retrieve a list of entities from some tables.

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