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int main()
{

  enum Days{Sunday,Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday};

  Days TheDay;

  int j = 0;

  printf("Please enter the day of the week (0 to 6)\n");

  scanf("%d",&j);

  TheDay = Days(j);

  //how to PRINT THE VALUES stored in TheDay

  printf("%s",TheDay);  //   isnt working

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your expected output is for it to print the string "Sunday", etc.? –  GalacticCowboy Jul 2 '10 at 18:45
    
printf("%d",Sunday); //prints 0 but I want to get the reverse output. –  avi Jul 2 '10 at 18:46
    
yes, exactly Mr. Galactic!! –  avi Jul 2 '10 at 18:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Enumerations in C are numbers that have convenient names inside your code. They are not strings, and the names assigned to them in the source code are not compiled into your program, and so they are not accessible at runtime.

The only way to get what you want is to write a function yourself that translates the enumeration value into a string. E.g. (assuming here that you move the declaration of enum Days outside of main):

const char* getDayName(enum Days day) 
{
   switch (day) 
   {
      case Sunday: return "Sunday";
      case Monday: return "Monday";
      /* etc... */
   }
}

/* Then, later in main: */
printf("%s", getDayName(TheDay));

Alternatively, you could use an array as a map, e.g.

const char* dayNames[] = {"Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", /* ... etc ... */ };

/* ... */

printf("%s", dayNames[TheDay]);

But here you would probably want to assign Sunday = 0 in the enumeration to be safe... I'm not sure if the C standard requires compilers to begin enumerations from 0, although most do (I'm sure someone will comment to confirm or deny this).

share|improve this answer
    
I understood.... I Think I will have to do it the other way round only. Thanks Mr Tyler. –  avi Jul 2 '10 at 18:51
2  
Aw, you beat me to the array solution. :P But yes, enums always start at 0 unless you specify a different value. –  casablanca Jul 2 '10 at 18:51
1  
If I were relying on using the enumerations as indexes, I would actually prefer to explicitly number each one. Unnecessary according to standards, but as a group compilers have not exactly been the best at following standards in my experience. –  jdmichal Jul 2 '10 at 18:51
2  
The C standard says, "If the first enumerator has no =, the value of its enumeration constant is 0". But it doesn't hurt anything to have it explicit. –  Michael Burr Jul 2 '10 at 18:52
9  
Don't forget that with C99 you can do const char* dayNames[] = {[Sunday] = "Sunday", [Monday] = "Monday", [Tuesday] = "Tuesday", /* ... etc ... */ };. You know, in case the days of the week are reordered, or you decide that Monday is the first day of the week. –  Tim Schaeffer Jul 2 '10 at 20:13

I use something like this:

in a file "EnumToString.h":

#undef DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT
#undef DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL
#undef DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_STR
#undef DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL_STR
#undef BEGIN_ENUM
#undef END_ENUM

#ifndef GENERATE_ENUM_STRINGS
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT( element ) element,
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL( element, value ) element = value,
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_STR( element, descr ) DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT( element )
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL_STR( element, value, descr ) DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL( element, value )
    #define BEGIN_ENUM( ENUM_NAME ) typedef enum tag##ENUM_NAME
    #define END_ENUM( ENUM_NAME ) ENUM_NAME; \
            const char* GetString##ENUM_NAME(enum tag##ENUM_NAME index);
#else
    #define BEGIN_ENUM( ENUM_NAME) const char * GetString##ENUM_NAME( enum tag##ENUM_NAME index ) {\
        switch( index ) { 
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT( element ) case element: return #element; break;
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL( element, value ) DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT( element )
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_STR( element, descr ) case element: return descr; break;
    #define DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL_STR( element, value, descr ) DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_STR( element, descr )

    #define END_ENUM( ENUM_NAME ) default: return "Unknown value"; } } ;

#endif

then in any header file you make the enum declaration, day enum.h

#include "EnumToString.h"

BEGIN_ENUM(Days)
{
    DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT(Sunday) //will render "Sunday"
    DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT(Monday) //will render "Monday"
    DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_STR(Tuesday, "Tuesday string") //will render "Tuesday string"
    DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT(Wednesday) //will render "Wednesday"
    DECL_ENUM_ELEMENT_VAL_STR(Thursday, 500, "Thursday string") // will render "Thursday string" and the enum will have 500 as value
    /* ... and so on */
}
END_ENUM(MyEnum)

then in a file called EnumToString.c:

#include "enum.h"

#define GENERATE_ENUM_STRINGS  // Start string generation

#include "enum.h"             

#undef GENERATE_ENUM_STRINGS   // Stop string generation

then in main.c:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Days TheDay = Monday;
    printf( "%d - %s\n", TheDay, GetStringDay(TheDay) ); //will print "1 - Monday"

    TheDay = Thursday;
    printf( "%d - %s\n", TheDay, GetStringDay(TheDay) ); //will print "500 - Thursday string"

    return 0;
}

this will generate "automatically" the strings for any enums declared this way and included in "EnumToString.c"

share|improve this answer
1  
It's ugly to read through, but you don't have data duplication. (Unlike everyone else.) I'm torn on whether to like this. –  Kim Reece Jul 2 '10 at 19:25
    
+1 for the awesomely creative solution with no data duplication and probably the best maintainability/flexibility, but yech! I think I'd still rather just go the const char*[] route. –  manifest Jul 2 '10 at 21:00
1  
Yeah, the maintainability is awesome! It's really easy to update when the days of the week change! </sarcasm> By the way, this isn't even useful for localization purposes since the mapping between the English strings and the names in the program is now hard-coded by your attempt to avoid duplication. At least with the other approaches, it's possible to translate the strings without changing every occurrence in the source files. –  R.. Jul 3 '10 at 5:20
1  
You can probably internationalize it by (with something like gettext) changing the return statements to return _(#element) and the like. –  Vargas Jul 5 '10 at 12:09
    
When the C preprocessor is this useful but this ugly, I usually replace it with a simple code generator or custom preprocessor in a scripting language. And in fact, I've got a Python script I've used for exactly this purpose in multiple projects. But I don't use it that often nowadays—for many use cases you can get away with just using strings and not bothering with the enums (and even more so in C++ or ObjC). –  abarnert May 11 '12 at 0:50

enums in C don't really work the way you're expecting them to. You can think of them kind of like glorified constants (with a few additional benefits relating to being a collection of such constants), and the text you've written in for "Sunday" really gets resolved to a number during compilation, the text is ultimately discarded.

In short: to do what you really want you'll need to keep an array of the strings or create a function to map from the enum's value to the text you'd like to print.

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Enumerations in C are basically syntactical sugar for named lists of automatically-sequenced integer values. That is, when you have this code:

int main()
{
    enum Days{Sunday,Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday};

    Days TheDay = Monday;
}

Your compiler actually spits out this:

int main()
{
    int TheDay = 1; // Monday is the second enumeration, hence 1. Sunday would be 0.
}

Therefore, outputting a C enumeration as a string is not an operation that makes sense to the compiler. If you want to have human-readable strings for these, you will need to define functions to convert from enumerations to strings.

share|improve this answer

The way I usually do this is by storing the string representations in a separate array in the same order, then indexing the array with the enum value:

const char *DayNames[] = { "Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", /* etc */ };
printf("%s", DayNames[Sunday]); // prints "Sunday"
share|improve this answer

Here's a cleaner way to do it with macros:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define DOW(X, S)                                                         \
    X(Sunday) S X(Monday) S X(Tuesday) S X(Wednesday) S X(Thursday) S X(Friday) S X(Saturday)

#define COMMA ,

/* declare the enum */
#define DOW_ENUM(DOW) DOW
enum dow {
    DOW(DOW_ENUM, COMMA)
};

/* create an array of strings with the enum names... */
#define DOW_ARR(DOW ) [DOW] = #DOW
const char * const dow_str[] = {
    DOW(DOW_ARR, COMMA)
};

/* ...or create a switchy function. */
static const char * dowstr(int i)
{
#define DOW_CASE(D) case D: return #D

    switch(i) {
        DOW(DOW_CASE, ;);
    default: return NULL;
    }
}


int main(void)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 7; i++)
        printf("[%d] = «%s»\n", i, dow_str[i]);
    printf("\n");
    for(int i = 0; i < 7; i++)
        printf("[%d] = «%s»\n", i, dowstr(i));
    return 0;
}

I'm not sure that this is totally portable b/w preprocessors, but it works with gcc.

This is c99 btw, so use c99 strict if you plug it into (the online compiler) ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
Gotta love how “clean” macros are :-). –  Mk12 Nov 5 '12 at 18:51

TheDay maps back to some integer type. So:

printf("%s", TheDay);

Attempts to parse TheDay as a string, and will either print out garbage or crash.

printf is not typesafe and trusts you to pass the right value to it. To print out the name of the value, you'd need to create some method for mapping the enum value to a string - either a lookup table, giant switch statement, etc.

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i'm new to this but a switch statement will defenitely work

#include <stdio.h>

enum mycolor;

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])

{
enum Days{Sunday=1,Monday=2,Tuesday=3,Wednesday=4,Thursday=5,Friday=6,Saturday=7};

enum Days TheDay;


printf("Please enter the day of the week (0 to 6)\n");

scanf("%d",&TheDay);

switch (TheDay)
 {

case Sunday:
        printf("the selected day is sunday");
        break;
    case Monday:
        printf("the selected day is monday");
        break;
    case Tuesday:
        printf("the selected day is Tuesday");
        break;
    case Wednesday:
        printf("the selected day is Wednesday");
        break;
    case Thursday:
        printf("the selected day is thursday");
        break;
    case Friday:
        printf("the selected day is friday");
        break;
    case Saturday:
        printf("the selected day is Saturaday");
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

This one also works

 enum Days{Sunday=1,Monday=2,Tuesday=3,Wednesday=4,Thursday=5,Friday=6,Saturday=7};

enum Days TheDay;


printf("Please enter the day of the week (0 to 6)\n");

scanf("%d",&TheDay);

printf("%s",&TheDay);
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