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Consider the following code:

public class MyClass
{
   public delegate string PrintHelloType(string greeting);


    public void Execute()
    {

        Type[] types = new Type[] { typeof(string), typeof(float), typeof(int)};
        List<PrintHelloType> helloMethods = new List<PrintHelloType>();

        foreach (var type in types)
        {
            var sayHello = 
                new PrintHelloType(greeting => SayGreetingToType(type, greeting));
            helloMethods.Add(sayHello);
        }

        foreach (var helloMethod in helloMethods)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(helloMethod("Hi"));
        }

    }

    public string SayGreetingToType(Type type, string greetingText)
    {
        return greetingText + " " + type.Name;
    }

...

}

After calling myClass.Execute(), the code prints the following unexpected response:

Hi Int32
Hi Int32
Hi Int32  

Obviously, I would expect "Hi String", "Hi Single", "Hi Int32", but apparently it is not the case. Why the last element of the iterated array is being used in all the 3 methods instead of the appropriate one?

How would you rewrite the code to achieve the desired goal?

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I didn't even read the question, but from the title, I know the answer is: lorgonblog.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!701679AD17B6D310!689.entry –  Brian Jul 2 '10 at 19:07
    
The daily captured variable question rears its ugly head. –  Marc Jul 2 '10 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Welcome to the world of closures and captured variables :)

Eric Lippert has an in-depth explanation of this behaviour:

basically, it's the loop variable that is captured, not it's value. To get what you think you should get, do this:

foreach (var type in types)
{
   var newType = type;
   var sayHello = 
            new PrintHelloType(greeting => SayGreetingToType(newType, greeting));
   helloMethods.Add(sayHello);
}
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4  
The @Eric Lippert beacon has been lit. –  Anthony Pegram Jul 2 '10 at 18:57
2  
There is no god but Anders, and Eric is his prophet :) –  SWeko Jul 2 '10 at 18:58
    
I might add that this can catch even those well-versed in closures off guard - Lua, and probably other languages, have the type lexically inside of the loop brackets. So in Lua you still capture the variable, but it's a new variable every iteration. This is something that when programming in Lua you make use of all the time - but in my years of programming in C# I'm yet to write a method that's benefited from it's type-is-outside-of-the-brackets scoping. Has anyone? –  Mania Apr 17 '11 at 16:30

You can fix it by introducing additional variable:

...
foreach (var type in types)
        {
            var t = type;
            var sayHello = new PrintHelloType(greeting => SayGreetingToType(t, greeting));
            helloMethods.Add(sayHello);
        }
....
share|improve this answer

As a brief explanation that alludes to the blog postings that SWeko referenced, a lambda is capturing the variable, not the value. In a foreach loop, the variable is not unique on each iteration, the same variable is used for the duration of the loop (this is more obvious when you see the expansion the compiler performs on the foreach at compile time). As a result, you've captured the same variable during each iteration, and the variable (as of the last iteration) refers to the last element of your set.

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