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I have three tables, we'll call them table1, table2, and table3. Lets say each table has a user id column and a date column. What i'd like to do is to be able to count the number of rows with a specific user id in table1, and sum it with the number of rows with that user id in tables 2 and 3.

I'd then like to take that first query I did which has all rows with the user id, and then take out and count the ones where the date column is greater than a certain date (unix time).

All I'd like to receive in the end is two things. The number of rows in tables 1, 2 and 3 that have the user ID I was looking for summed together, and the number of rows in tables 1, 2 and 3 that have the user ID I was looking for while also being after a certain date summed together.

What's the most efficient way of doing this?

Thanks!

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1  
an example would really help, and for efficiency questions, knowing the target db is also very useful. –  mdma Jul 2 '10 at 22:20
    
Table 1 is dogs, table 2 is cats, table 3 is ferrets. Date is when they were bought. Say my friend Sam's user id is 9. I want to be able to count how many total pets my friend Sam has, IE the number of cats with user id of 9, the number of ferrets with id 9, and the number of dogs with id of 9 summed together. Then I'd like to be able to count how many pets my friend Sam bought after June of last year. I'd prefer to not have to search through all of them twice, since all the pets Sam bought after June is encapsulated in the number of pets Sam has. –  Ethan Jul 2 '10 at 22:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
SELECT 
    COUNT(*) AS TotalPets, 
    SUM(CASE WHEN date > somedate THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS TotalPetsAfterDate
FROM
(
SELECT date FROM dogs WHERE UserId = 9
UNION ALL
SELECT date FROM cats WHERE UserId = 9
UNION ALL
SELECT date FROM ferrets WHERE UserId = 9
) Pets

Or an alternative to try that may make Imre happier.

SELECT 
    SUM(PetsSubTotal) AS TotalPets, 
    SUM(PetsAfterDateSubTotal) AS TotalPetsAfterDate
FROM
(
SELECT COUNT(*) AS PetsSubTotal,  SUM(CASE WHEN date > somedate THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS PetsAfterDateSubTotal
FROM dogs 
WHERE UserId = 9
UNION ALL
SELECT COUNT(*) AS PetsSubTotal,  SUM(CASE WHEN date > somedate THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS PetsAfterDateSubTotal
FROM cats 
WHERE UserId = 9
UNION ALL
SELECT COUNT(*) AS PetsSubTotal,  SUM(CASE WHEN date > somedate THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS PetsAfterDateSubTotal
FROM ferrets 
WHERE UserId = 9
) SubTotals
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1  
+1 exactly what I was writing! –  mdma Jul 2 '10 at 22:27
    
this is inefficient because it composes temporary table. It could be done with using just count(*)-s that are using table metadata and/or indexes. –  Imre L Jul 2 '10 at 22:32
    
@Imre L - What are you basing that on? We don't even know the target RDBMS. –  Martin Smith Jul 2 '10 at 22:41
    
Yours looks through each table twice, Imre. Wouldn't that be slower than his? –  Ethan Jul 2 '10 at 22:44
    
@Ethan - Yep. I just did a test in SQL Server and it was exactly double the cost. –  Martin Smith Jul 2 '10 at 23:12

As an alternative to the other answer (which I also like) and assuming you have a table of User IDs:

Select 
  CustID, Count(Pet_ID) as Total, Sum(In_Range) as AfterDate
From
  (Select
    CustID, Pet_ID, Case When PurDate > somedate Then 1 else 0 End as In_Range
  From
    Users
  Inner Join
    Pets
      on Users.CustId = Pets.CustId
  Where
    CustId = 9) D
Group By
  CustID
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