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Let's say I have a base class defined as follows:

class Form(object):
    class Meta:
        model = None
        method = 'POST'

Now a developer comes a long and defines his subclass like:

class SubForm(Form):
    class Meta:
        model = 'User'

Now suddenly the method attribute is lost. How can I "get it back" without forcing the user to inherit his meta class from mine? Can I dynamically add a base class to Form.Meta in the initializer, or in a metaclass's __new__ func?

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Please clarify how you intend for Form, SubForm, and Meta to be used. What use case are you thinking of that will break with the above code? Why wouldn't it be appropriate to have the user's Meta inherit from yours? –  Owen S. Jul 2 '10 at 23:37
    
@Owen S: Because, (a) it's more typing, (b) they might forget that they need to subclass Form.Meta, (c) it's inconsistent with the library I'm already using (Django). Intended use? I just need form.Meta.method to be defined once its instantiated. –  Mark Jul 3 '10 at 0:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+25

As long as they won't override your __init__, or it will be called (ie by super), you can monkey-patch the Meta inner class:

class Form(object):
    class Meta:
        model = None
        method = "POST"

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.__class__ != Form:
            self.Meta.__bases__ += (Form.Meta,)
        # other __init__ code here.

class SubForm(Form):
    class Meta:
        model = 'User'
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There we go... that's what I asked :D –  Mark Jul 15 '10 at 7:32
    
Oh..what happens if you add the same base twice? Anything bad? It's possible that they leave Meta blank or something. –  Mark Jul 15 '10 at 7:33
    
You could check that (a) there is a Meta inner class, and that Form.Meta is not already in the class hierarchy. I'll update my answer when I'm on a real keyboard. –  Matthew Schinckel Jul 15 '10 at 23:27
    
Oops...should have given you the full bounty. It expired. –  Mark Jul 16 '10 at 19:24

Do you really need Meta to be defined that way? If you only need to access it as form.Meta.method, why wouldn't you just use a dotdict?

class dotdict(dict):
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return self.get(attr, None)
    __setattr__= dict.__setitem__
    __delattr__= dict.__delitem__

Then you can do this:

class Form(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.Meta = dotdict()
        self.Meta.model = None
        self.Meta.method = 'POST'

class SubForm(Form):
    def __init__(self):
        Form.__init__(self)
        self.Meta.model = 'User'
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I really prefer the meta syntax in the subform....what goes in in the form doesn't really matter tho. –  Mark Jul 14 '10 at 19:05

You can check for method attribute in the __init__ method of a parent object and update it if needed. Of course this will work only if the programmer you are protecting your code from will call it in his constructor.

class Form(object):
    def __init__(self):
            if not getattr(self.Meta,'method',False):
                    self.Meta.method='POST'
    class Meta:
       model = None
       method = 'POST'

class SubForm(Form):
    class Meta:
       model = 'User'
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The way it's designed, they shouldn't be writing any methods, so the initializer shouldn't get overridden. If it does... well, then their app just won't work ;) This suggestion defeats the purpose of having the Meta class in the Form object at all. I think it would be prettier to store all the default attributes in a dict, and then... either just call update as I've suggested, or do what you did, but iter the keys and update as necessary. –  Mark Jul 13 '10 at 1:23
    
This approach places your attributes into the standard storage: the Meta class. If you combine both approaches maybe it will be protective and standard. –  Frost.baka Jul 13 '10 at 13:37
    
But you're setting the default attribute twice!! Once in init and once in Meta. That's awful! To keep them in the Meta, you just have to ensure that the Meta class exists, i.e., class Meta: pass, and then put all the actual defaults in init. –  Mark Jul 14 '10 at 1:54

Maybe I could omit the default Meta class inside Form and use a default dict instead?

meta_defaults = {'model':None, 'method':'POST'}
meta_vars = meta_defaults
meta_vars.update(Form.Meta.__dict__)
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1  
Unfortunately the metaclass will be looking for the Meta inner class in order to set options in the outer class. Magic, whee! –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 13 '10 at 9:03

Maybe you could use a metaclass like this:

class _Meta:
    model = None
    method = "Post"

class MetaForm(type):

    def __init__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        super(MetaForm, cls).__init__(name, bases, dct)
        if hasattr(cls, 'Meta'):            
            meta = getattr(cls, 'Meta')                
            for k,v in _Meta.__dict__.items():
                check = meta.__dict__.get(k)
                if not check:
                    meta.__dict__[k] = v    
        else:
            setattr(cls, "Meta", _Meta)        


class Form(object):
    __metaclass__ = MetaForm

class SubForm(Form):
    class Meta:
        model = 'User'

class Sub2Form(Form):
    pass

sub_form = SubForm()        
sub2_form = Sub2Form()    

print sub_form.Meta.method # prints "Post"
print sub2_form.Meta.model # prints None

The code is really simple and maybe you need to suit it to your needs.

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sub2_form = Sub2Form() maybe? –  Stobor Jul 15 '10 at 23:55
    
Yes, thank you. Corrected it. –  zovision Jul 16 '10 at 9:23

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