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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    //char s[6] = {'h','e','l','l','o','\0'};
    char *s = "hello";       
    int i=0,m;
    char temp;

    int n = strlen(s);
    //s[n] = '\0';
    while (i<(n/2))
    {
         temp = *(s+i);       //uses the null character as the temporary storage.
         *(s+i) = *(s+n-i-1);
         *(s+n-i-1) = temp;
         i++;
    }
    printf("rev string = %s\n",s);
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

On the compilation the error is segmentation fault (access violation). Please tell what is the difference between the two definitions:

char s[6] = {'h','e','l','l','o','\0'};
char *s = "hello"; 
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marked as duplicate by Deduplicator, JasonMArcher, Chris, Reto Koradi, Michael Walz yesterday

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
perhaps a different title? though the example is code to reverse a string, the actual question is about modifying arrays and string literals –  akf Jul 3 '10 at 16:54
    
Do you have any reason why you aren't using strrev()? Also, this will break with multi-byte characters. –  Piskvor Jul 3 '10 at 17:19
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4 Answers 4

You can try this:

void strrev(char *in, char *out, int len){
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < len; i++){
        out[len - i - 1] = in[i];
    }
}

Note that it doesn't deal with the string terminator.

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With some versions of gcc you can allow modification of static strings with -fwritable-strings. Not that there is really any good excuse to do that.

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If you do char s[6] = {'h','e','l','l','o','\0'}; you put 6 chars into an array on the stack. When you do char *s = "hello"; there's only a pointer on the stack and the memory that it points to may be read only. Writing to that memory causes undefined behavior.

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Your code attempts to modify a string literal which is not allowed in C or C++ If you change:

char *s = "hello"; 

to:

char s[] = "hello"; 

then you are modifying the contents of the array, into which the literal has been copied (equivalent to initialising the array with individual characters), which is OK.

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