Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I noticed that I'm often in the need of a container class. For example when working on a particle system, I create a container class Particles which has a member vector<Particle*>. Then I call: Particles* my_particles like my_particles->draw(), and in the Particles.draw() I iterator over the vector<Particle*> and call draw() on each of the particles again. The same works for member functions like update(), addforce() etc.. Now, I'm working on a project and need a collection of Cube on which I need to call tween(), moveTowards() etc..

I know I can use template, but in the case of a template class the member functions need to be knows before. As I want to check if I can make a generic class, that I can use for example both my Cubes and Particles collections.

Someone who has done this before or can give me some advice on this?

Kind regards, Pollux

share|improve this question
    
why don't you have something like: typedef std::vector<Particle> Particles and then void draw(Particles& p) etc.? Then you could do typedef std::vector<Cube> Cubes and void tween(Cubes& c, ...) ... I think that's better design. –  Karl von Moor Jul 3 '10 at 18:34
    
Polybos, I can do that, but that's not what I mean with my question. Though thanks a lot of taking your time to answer! I think Stephen answered my question! –  pollux Jul 3 '10 at 22:38
    
Why do you store pointers ? you expose yourself to memory leaks if you don't store the objects themselves. If you need polymorphism, you can use boost::ptr_vector which will manage the memory for you. –  Matthieu M. Jul 4 '10 at 10:55
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The short answer is that you can't do this in c++. You can, however, use STL algorithms and containers to wrap this behavior up.

First, you'd put your Cube or Particle instances into a std::vector or other container (like you have now).

Then you'd use STL's std::for_each in combination with std::mem_fun.

It'd result in something like this:

  std::vector<Particle*> V;

  V.push_back(new Particle);
  V.push_back(new Particle);
  V.push_back(new Particle);
  V.push_back(new Particle);

  std::for_each(V.begin(), V.end(), std::mem_fun(&Particle::draw));
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Stephen! Thanks, I think this is exactly what I was looking for, or I think this is the best solution. What is the difference between this and using a iterator and looping over the Particles in a loop? Maybe only performance? (I can imagine using a custom for loop would be a bit faster, which can be important when using thousands of particles). One more question, is there a way to pass parameters as well? –  pollux Jul 3 '10 at 22:40
    
Actually, for_each will be just as good or even faster than your handwritten loop if you're invoking functions. mem_fun adds a probably negligible overhead. Passing parameters is tricky since for_each only knows how to pass the object itself as a parameter; you need to create a function-like object that receives the parameter via other means. boost::bind can help hugely with this kind of thing, also at a probably negligible overhead. –  Owen S. Jul 4 '10 at 0:04
    
@pollux : This will probably be as fast as a custom for loop, and not likely dependent on the number of particles. The compiler will be able to generate very similar code, but the for_each might not be inlined, resulting in one more function call. The only way to be sure is benchmark. WRT passing parameters, std::mem_fun can't really support it, but the boost libraries can boost.org/doc/libs/1_32_0/libs/bind/mem_fn.html used with boost.org/doc/libs/1_32_0/libs/bind/bind.html . Hope that helps. –  Stephen Jul 4 '10 at 0:22
    
Would this work considering that we have pointers to Particle here ? Don't you need a reference to invoke the function from mem_fun on ? –  Matthieu M. Jul 4 '10 at 10:56
    
@Matthieu : According to STL documentation it will. mem_fun_ref is for when you're storing the objects. –  Stephen Jul 4 '10 at 13:00
show 1 more comment

Not sure I definitely understand, but would the for_each STL algorithm help? http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/for_each.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! As Stephen also suggested, I think this is what I need, or would be the best solution. –  pollux Jul 3 '10 at 22:42
add comment

I read you asking: "can I make a generic container that can be used for both cubes and particles, even though they have different member functions?" Sure, that's the easy part. You can even put both cubes and particles in the same container if you want. If you're dealing with pointers, you just use void*:

std::vector<void*> objects;
objects.push_back(new Particle(...));
objects.push_back(new Cube(...));

Of course, there's not much you can do with void*s, except cast them back:

for (i = objects.begin(), i != objects.end(), ++i) {
    void* p = objects[i];
    Particle* particle = dynamic_cast<Particle*>(p);
    if (particle) {
        // do particle stuff
        continue;
    }
    Cube* cube = dynamic_cast<Cube*>(p);
    if (cube) {
        // do cube stuff
    }
}

And even if you're only storing Particles in your vector, say, you still have to downcast to work with them:

for (i = objects.begin(), i != objects.end(), ++i) {
    void* p = objects[i];
    Particle* particle = dynamic_cast<Particle*>(p);
    if (particle) {
        // do particle stuff
    } else {
        // error!! I thought someone told me this thing only had Particles...
    }
}

You can see that doing this is much more awkward than just storing them in separate vectors where you know the type of each of the objects in each vector and don't have to perform runtime downcasts to work with them. This is why this kind of container is often considered poor style.

Other possibilities for you to look at in this area are boost::any or boost::variant, which work on things besides pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Owen, this wasn't exactly what I meant. I don't want to create one container and then check their type in the loops. Though it's nice to see this is possible. –  pollux Jul 3 '10 at 22:42
add comment

As far as I understood, there is a design problem here, you want to iterate over different object categories (Cube/Particle) using the same interface, but it's pretty clear that they couldn't share the same interface, and if you really want that, you must implement the tween() and moveTowards() on the abstract base class of Particles and Cube, and implement nothing in the Particles class.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think he's trying to put Particles and Cubes in the same container, he's just wants to avoid repeating all the methods in the container object. –  Stephen Jul 3 '10 at 18:43
add comment

For completeness, there is also valarray, though using vector/for_each is a better solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.