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Is there an easy way when inserting a new record to make it fail if one of the fields is a duplicate of one of the other fields?

I don´t want the field to be a primary key or anything like that...

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Is putting a unique index/constraint on the field "anything like that"? – Paul Tomblin Jul 3 '10 at 20:46
2  
Do you mean one of the columns is the same value as one of the other columns in the same line, or do you mean that the values in the column are unique? – Matthew Farwell Jul 3 '10 at 20:47

Set the column as unique.

More on this

http://php.about.com/od/mysqlcommands/g/add_unique.htm

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As has been said by hgulyan, if you want a table.col1 to be unique, add a unique constraint on the column.

If what you mean is that you want the insert to fail if column table1.col1 = table1.col2, then you can implement this in a trigger. See MYSQL Create Trigger.

To raise an exception in the trigger, so that the insert fails, see TRIGGERs that cause INSERTs to fail? Possible?

Something like:

CREATE TRIGGER Employee_beforeinsert before insert
ON Employee FOR EACH ROW
    BEGIN
    IF new.age = new.age2 THEN
        DECLARE dummy INT;

        SELECT 'Your meaningful error message goes here' INTO dummy 
        FROM Employee
        WHERE Employee.id=new.id
    END IF;
END;
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The following is Standard SQL, rather than mySQL dialect, but mySQL is has a good level of compliance with the Standard and I trust you should be able to follow my point.

You didn't post your schema or sample data so I had to guess what your tables might look like:

CREATE TABLE Mothers
(
 mother_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE
);

CREATE TABLE Children
(
 child_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE
);

CREATE TABLE MothersOfTwins
(
 mother_ID INTEGER NOT NULL 
    UNIQUE REFERENCES Mothers (mother_ID), 
 twin_1_child_ID INTEGER 
    REFERENCES Children (child_ID), 
 twin_2_child_ID INTEGER 
    REFERENCES Children (child_ID), 
 CHECK (twin_1_child_ID <> twin_2_child_ID)
);

INSERT INTO Mothers (mother_ID) VALUES (101), (102), (103);

INSERT INTO Children (child_ID) VALUES (551), (552), (553), (554);

INSERT INTO MothersOfTwins (mother_ID, twin_1_child_ID, twin_2_child_ID) 
VALUES 
(101, 551, 552), 
(102, 552, 551);  -- duplicate

That last INSERT succeeds even though it should fail i.e. transposing the child_ID values between rows will fool any UNIQUE constraint you care to put on the columns. I guess this is similar to the problem you are facing.

One solution to this problem is to create a base table which requires multiple rows to model siblings, using an 'occurrence' column with a constraint to ensure there cannot be more than two siblings (i.e. twins):

DROP TABLE MothersOfTwins;

CREATE TABLE MothersOfTwinsBase
(
 mother_ID INTEGER NOT NULL
    REFERENCES Mothers (mother_ID), 
 twin_occurrence INTEGER NOT NULL
    CHECK (twin_occurrence BETWEEN 1 AND 2), 
 twin_child_ID INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE 
    REFERENCES Children (child_ID), 
 UNIQUE (mother_ID, twin_occurrence)
);

INSERT INTO MothersOfTwinsBase (mother_ID, twin_occurrence, twin_child_ID) 
VALUES 
(101, 1, 551), 
(101, 2, 552),
(102, 1, 553),
(103, 2, 554);

You can then recreate the data structure of your former base table using a VIEW e.g.

CREATE VIEW MothersOfTwins
(
 mother_ID, 
 twin_1_child_ID, twin_2_child_ID
)
AS
SELECT M1.mother_ID, 
       M1.twin_child_ID AS twin_1_child_ID, 
       M2.twin_child_ID AS twin_2_child_ID
  FROM MothersOfTwinsBase AS M1 
       INNER JOIN MothersOfTwinsBase AS M2
          ON M1.mother_ID = M2.mother_ID
             AND M1.twin_occurrence = 1
             AND M2.twin_occurrence = 2
UNION ALL
SELECT M1.mother_ID, 
       M1.twin_child_ID AS twin_1_child_ID, 
       NULL AS twin_2_child_ID
  FROM MothersOfTwinsBase AS M1 
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                   SELECT *
                     FROM MothersOfTwinsBase AS M2
                          WHERE M1.mother_ID = M2.mother_ID
                                AND M2.twin_occurrence = 2
                  )
UNION ALL
SELECT M2.mother_ID, 
       NULL AS twin_1_child_ID, 
       M2.twin_child_ID AS twin_2_child_ID
  FROM MothersOfTwinsBase AS M2
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                   SELECT *
                     FROM MothersOfTwinsBase AS M1
                          WHERE M1.mother_ID = M2.mother_ID
                                AND M1.twin_occurrence = 1
                  );
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