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I have 4 numbers 0-3 which is an enum (objective-c) and I'd like to get the opposite using a formula. So if 0 is put into the formula it returns 2 and if it 2 is entered then it returns 0 (and same with 1 and 3).

The reason being (and it is programming related) that I want to get the opposite of an enum without having to do an if or switch statement. But this means that any formula (if it is possible must uncomplex, so that it is more efficient than using if or switch.

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Why do you want this in the first place? What relationship would the bit shifted values have to the original enum? Zero is not the "opposite" of 2 in any real sense. –  TechZen Jul 3 '10 at 22:26
    
well it is when they represent the sides of a square (top is opposite of bottom, left opposite of right) –  Jonathan. Jul 4 '10 at 6:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The formula is very simple:

n = n ^ 2;

The bitvalues of 0 - 3 and how an exclusive or changes them:

n       ^10
---------------
0 = 00 : 10 = 2
1 = 01 : 11 = 3
2 = 10 : 00 = 0
3 = 11 : 01 = 1

Test (written in C#):

for (int n = 0; n <= 3; n++) {
  Console.WriteLine("{0} : {1}", n, n ^ 2);
}

Output:

0 : 2
1 : 3
2 : 0
3 : 1
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same comment as above, this wouldn't work. –  Jonathan. Jul 3 '10 at 21:56
    
@Jonathan: It works on my computer. –  Adrian Jul 3 '10 at 21:57
1  
it does work - perhaps you were thinking that ^ meant exponentiation? It is bitwise exclusive or. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#XOR –  Ken Jul 3 '10 at 22:00
    
sorry that comment was before it was changed. But now I do not understand the answer, so could you explain it a little more? (ken yes I did think that, thanks) –  Jonathan. Jul 3 '10 at 22:00
    
Is there a better explanation of it, than the wikipedia page? –  Jonathan. Jul 3 '10 at 22:03
int newValue = 3 - originalValue;

Maybe cast to your enum type.

Edit: Sorry, this swaps 0 <=> 3 and 1 <=> 2, which I thought was meant with opposite.

For 0 <=> 2 and 1 <=> 3 you can use

int newValue = (originalValue + 2) % 4;
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im not sure how this works to do 0->2, 1->3, 2->0, 3->1? –  Jonathan. Jul 3 '10 at 21:55
    
That doesn't work. The result values should be {2, 3, 0, 1}. –  Adrian Jul 3 '10 at 21:56
    
Sorry, misread "opposite" and extended it... But Guffa's xor is probably the better way to do this. More generally, you can use an array-lookup. –  Eiko Jul 3 '10 at 21:57
    
thanks for your answer, it was interesting, but it seems Guffa's answer is better. –  Jonathan. Jul 3 '10 at 22:05

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