Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
def myfunc(x):
 y = x
 y.append('How do I stop Python from modifying x here?')
 return y

x = []
z = myfunc(x)
print(x)
share|improve this question
    
This will help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/986006/… –  VoodooChild Jul 4 '10 at 3:52
    
People who are downvoting my question: How should I have known about this? The style I gave would work in every other language I have used. –  Ricky Demer Jul 4 '10 at 4:02
    
@ricky: I rarely downvote and didn't here, but in answer to your question, you are right Python assignment is different than many other languages, but I'm guessing the downvoters are thinking something like "RTFM". Regardless, for your own sake, don't sweat one downvoted question (if it happens a bunch, you should probably try to figure out why). –  msw Jul 4 '10 at 4:24
    
@Ricky, I'm no downvoter either, but note that in Java -- perhaps the single most widespread programming language, certainly the most taught in college today -- assignment is by reference, just like in Python. Perhaps the downvoters just intrinsically think in those terms (rather than, say, in terms of Fortran, Pascal, C, ...). –  Alex Martelli Jul 4 '10 at 4:38
6  
@Ricky Demer You should edit the title. "Difficulty with Python" could be anything. –  Setsuna F. Seiei Jul 4 '10 at 4:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You do:

y = x[:]

to make a copy of list x.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's worth noting that the copy is shallow. –  FMc Jul 4 '10 at 11:52

You need to copy X before you modify it,

def myfunc(x):
 y = list(x)
 y.append('How do I stop Python from modifying x here?')
 return y

x = []
z = myfunc(x)
print(x)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.