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I read this article which explained very well how to setup pgp on osx, but I'm planning to use the generated keys for signing git commits, so I figure I need to transfer the keys to my other computer. Is this correct? and if so how do I go about transferring the keys?

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Which other computer? Why do you need two computers for this? –  igorw Jul 4 '10 at 15:59
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I actually have 3 comps, one win/mac/ubuntu, and I programm on all of them, and thus need sign refs in git with the same signature, so I assume I need to transfer the pgp keys, do I not? –  erikvold Jul 4 '10 at 18:42
    
igorw, nosy much? –  troylshields May 10 at 22:55
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, you will need to transfer the keys. Mac and Linux work the same, storing the keys in ~/.gnupg. The safest way to transfer the files is using scp (part of ssh):

scp -rp ~/.gnupg othermachine:

However, you will need to have ssh working first.

Transferring them with, say, a USB flash drive isn't such a great idea because your private key will be left behind on that drive even after you've deleted the file.

I don't know about the location of the directory on Windows. The gpg documentation will say, and the contents will almost certainly be the same.

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"Transferring them with, say, a USB flash drive isn't such a great idea because your private key will be left behind on that drive even after you've deleted the file." Well, if you are so paranoid, you can always encrypt the keys with some symmetric cipher for transfer. –  Roman Cheplyaka Jul 4 '10 at 22:25
    
Good idea! Thanks. –  Neil Mayhew Jul 8 '10 at 20:30
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They private key is already encrypted with the passphrase you provided when you encrypted it. Encrypting it again doesn't make it more secure. –  Ry4an Jul 12 '10 at 4:17
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It depends on PGP software. All you need to do - is to found, where your keyrings files are physically located, and copy those files to the new computer. Or, export your keys from PGP software, and import them on the other side.

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