Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my everlasting quest to suck less I keep bumping into the "yield" statement.
I have tried to wrap my head around it a few times now, but I'm stumped every time with the same error.

It goes a little something like this:

The body of [someMethod] cannot be an iterator block because 'System.Collections.Generic.List< AClass>' is not an iterator interface type.

This is the code where I last got stuck:

        foreach (XElement header in headersXml.Root.Elements()){
            yield return (ParseHeader(header));                
        }

What am I doing wrong? Can't I use the yield in an iterator? Then what's the point? In the case example it said that List< ProductMixHeader> is not an iterator interface type. ProductMixHeader is a custom class, but I imagine List is an iterator interface type, not?

--Edit-- Thanks for all the quick answers. Answer given to first answer. I know this question isn't all that new and the same resouces keep popping up. It turned out I was thinking I could return List as a return type, but off course because List isn't lazy, it cannot be used. Changing my return type to IEnumerable solved the problem :D

Now a somewhat related question (not worth opening a new thread): is it worth giving IENumerable as a return type if I'm sure that 99% of the cases I'm going to go .ToList() anyway? What will performance do for me there?

share|improve this question
4  
I like the possitive approach 'quest to suck less' ;-). –  Toon Krijthe Nov 25 '08 at 14:21
    
This almost identical question has a link to some good Raymond Chen stuff: stackoverflow.com/questions/39476/… –  Will Dean Nov 25 '08 at 14:24
    
Yes, I'm good at relativating myself, yet have learned to see the world positive ;) There, some mental coaching. All for free :P –  Boris Callens Nov 25 '08 at 14:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 24 down vote accepted

A method using yield return must be declared as returning one of the following two interfaces:

IEnumerable<SomethingAppropriate>
IEnumerator<SomethingApropriate>

(thanks Jon and Marc for pointing out IEnumerator)

Example:

public IEnumerable<AClass> YourMethod()
{
    foreach (XElement header in headersXml.Root.Elements())
    {
        yield return (ParseHeader(header));                
    }
}

yield is a lazy producer of data, only producing another item after the first has been retrieved, whereas returning a list will return everything in one go.

So there is a difference, and you need to declare the method correctly.

For more information, read Jon's answer here, which contains some very useful links.

share|improve this answer
1  
For the record: or IEnumerator[<T>] –  Marc Gravell Nov 25 '08 at 14:23
1  
It can also be declared to return IEnumerator or IEnumerator<T>. –  Jon Skeet Nov 25 '08 at 14:23
3  
Darn it, beaten by 7 seconds ;) –  Jon Skeet Nov 25 '08 at 14:23
    
Section 10.14 of the C# Language Specification Version 4.0 specifies that the return type of an iterator must be one of the following: IEnumerator, IEnumerable, IEnumerator<T>, or IEnumerable<T> –  Ryan Prechel Mar 15 '13 at 16:15

It's a tricky topic. In a nutshell, it's an easy way of implementing IEnumerable and its friends. The compiler builds you a state machine, transforming parameters and local variables into instance variables in a new class. Complicated stuff.

I have a few resources on this:

share|improve this answer

"yield" creates an iterator block - a compiler generated class that can implement either IEnumerable[<T>] or IEnumerator[<T>]. Jon Skeet has a very good (and free) discussion of this in chapter 6 of C# in Depth.

But basically - to use "yield" your method must return an IEnumerable[<T>] or IEnumerator[<T>]. In this case:

public IEnumerable<AClass> SomeMethod() {
    // ...
    foreach (XElement header in headersXml.Root.Elements()){
        yield return (ParseHeader(header));                
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It thought that List<T> implemented IEnumerable, but apparantly it doesn't.. Now does it make sence to go the extra yield mile if you have to go SomeMethod().toList() a few lines further down the road? If my understanding serves me right, it defeats the whole purpose of yield, right? –  Boris Callens Nov 25 '08 at 14:44
    
@boris - List<T> does implement IEnumerable - but that isn't to point. To create an iterator block you must return either the ienumerable/ienumerator interface itself. It isn't defined for anything else. –  Marc Gravell Nov 25 '08 at 14:48
    
@boris - re the "defeats the whole purpose" - not at all ;-p There are a lot of uses where a streaming API (such as IEnumerable<T>) is preferable to a buffered collection (such as List<T>) - especially if you are dealing with many thousands of records (from a file or database). –  Marc Gravell Nov 25 '08 at 14:49
    
But that would kill the lazyness of my method. Not? –  Boris Callens Nov 25 '08 at 14:59
    
Sorry, re-read your answer and what you're saying is you should decide depending on the situation if you want it lazy or not. This brings me to my 2ndary question: if I know that I'm going to use ToList in 90% of the time, is it still better to return IENumerable and then ToList() it later? –  Boris Callens Nov 25 '08 at 15:01

List implements Ienumerable.

Here's an example that might shed some light on what you are trying to learn. I wrote this about 6 months

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace YieldReturnTest
{
    public class PrimeFinder
    {
        private Boolean isPrime(int integer)
        {
            if (0 == integer)
                return false;

            if (3 > integer)
                return true;

            for (int i = 2; i < integer; i++)
            {
                if (0 == integer % i)
                    return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

        public IEnumerable<int> FindPrimes()
        {
            int i;

            for (i = 1; i < 2147483647; i++)
            {
                if (isPrime(i))
                {
                    yield return i;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PrimeFinder primes = new PrimeFinder();

            foreach (int i in primes.FindPrimes())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
                Console.ReadLine();
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I highly recommend using Reflector to have a look at what yield actually does for you. You'll be able to see the full code of the class that the compiler generates for you when using yield, and I've found that people understand the concept much more quickly when they can see the low-level result (well, mid-level I guess).

share|improve this answer

What does the method you're using this in look like? I don't think this can be used in just a loop by itself.

For example...

public IEnumerable<string> GetValues() {
    foreach(string value in someArray) {
        if (value.StartsWith("A")) { yield return value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

@Ian P´s answer helped me a lot to understand yield and why it is used. One (major) use case for yield is in "foreach" loops after the "in" keyword not to return a fully completed list. Instead of returning a complete list at once, in each "foreach" loop only one item (the next item) is returned. So you will gain performance with yield in such cases. I have rewritten @Ian P´s code for my better understanding to the following:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace YieldReturnTest
{
    public class PrimeFinder
    {
        private Boolean isPrime(int integer)
        {
            if (0 == integer)
                return false;

            if (3 > integer)
                return true;

            for (int i = 2; i < integer; i++)
            {
                if (0 == integer % i)
                    return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

        public IEnumerable<int> FindPrimesWithYield()
        {
            int i;

            for (i = 1; i < 2147483647; i++)
            {
                if (isPrime(i))
                {
                    yield return i;
                }
            }
        }

        public IEnumerable<int> FindPrimesWithoutYield()
        {
            var primes = new List<int>();
            int i;
            for (i = 1; i < 2147483647; i++)
            {
                if (isPrime(i))
                {
                    primes.Add(i);
                }
            }
            return primes;
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PrimeFinder primes = new PrimeFinder();

            Console.WriteLine("Finding primes until 7 with yield...very fast...");
            foreach (int i in primes.FindPrimesWithYield()) // FindPrimesWithYield DOES NOT iterate over all integers at once, it returns item by item
            {
                if (i > 7)
                {
                    break;
                }
                Console.WriteLine(i);
                //Console.ReadLine();

            }

            Console.WriteLine("Finding primes until 7 without yield...be patient it will take lonkg time...");
            foreach (int i in primes.FindPrimesWithoutYield()) // FindPrimesWithoutYield DOES iterate over all integers at once, it returns the complete list of primes at once
            {
                if (i > 7)
                {
                    break;
                }
                Console.WriteLine(i);
                //Console.ReadLine();
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.