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I have a "smart" phone that doesn't seem to have a music shuffle function, so the next best thing is to write a bash script to prepend all filenames in the current directory with a random number.

Is this difficult to do?

Thanks.

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might want to run the suggestions below through `printf %05d $RANDOM`-"$i" first –  Matt Joiner Jul 4 '10 at 16:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, this is not hard to do. It will however mess up your carefully crafted filenames, and might be hard to undo.

You can use $RANDOM as a simple source of random numbers in bash. For your case:

#!/bin/bash
for file in *; do
  mv "$file" $RANDOM-"$file"
done

I didn't test this. You probably want to test this yourself on some small sample to make sure you know what it does.

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4  
Also, don't run it more than once on any given set of files, or it'll prepend another number. Nothing like having "1413-426-234235-2-NeverGonnaGiveYouUp.mp3". –  cHao Jul 4 '10 at 16:29
    
@cHao: Exactly. The whole approach of moving the files is broken. If he could use softlinks in some specific directory and just remove it once he's done. Not sure if his filesystem can do this. –  Benjamin Bannier Jul 4 '10 at 16:51
    
Unfortunately, I don't have access to things like links, since it's just a FAT system. Fortunately, the filenames are more or less meaningless since the important stuff is in ID3 tags. –  Reinderien Jul 4 '10 at 16:53
1  
one can use e.g. printf "%06d" $RANDOM to keep the length of random part a constant. –  Dummy00001 Jul 4 '10 at 17:55
1  
@cHao: actually, 4-8-15-16-23-42-NeverGonnaGiveYouUp.mp3 would be much worse ;P –  ninjalj Jul 4 '10 at 20:55

Not really difficult. Something like:

for i in *; do mv "$i" $RANDOM-"$i"; done
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This script will shuffle files and reshuffle them if they've already been shuffled. If you pass it an argument of -u it will unshuffle the files (remove the random prefix).

#!/bin/bash
for file in *.mp3
do
    if [[ -d $file ]]
    then
        continue    # skip directories
    fi
    if [[ $file =~ ^1[0-9]{5}9-(.*).mp3$ ]]    # get basename
    then
        name=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}                # of a previously shuffled file
    else
        name=${file%.mp3}                      # of an unshuffled file
    fi
    if [[ $1 != -u ]]
    then
        mv "$file" "1$(printf "%05d" $RANDOM)9-$name.mp3"    # shuffle
    else
        if [[ ! -e "$file.mp3" ]]
        then
            mv "$file" "$name.mp3"                           # unshuffle
        fi
    fi
done

It uses a fixed-width five digit random number after a "1" and followed by "9-" so the shuffled filenames are of the form: 1ddddd9-filename maybe with spaces - and other stuff.1983.mp3.

If you re-run the script, it will reshuffle the files by changing the random number in the prefix.

The -u argument will remove the 1ddddd9- prefix.

The script requires Bash >= version 3.2.

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Through this shell, your music library will be played randomly, without repeating any songs until all have been played. The history of songs played is recorded in the file ". Sh.his". This history is reset automatically if you added a song to the music library or have already heard all the songs of your library, generating a new random list ever. Whenever you want you can reset the history is deleting the file ". Sh.his".

#!/bin/bash

#-----------------------------------INFO----------------------------------------------------------

#Through this shell, your music library will be played randomly, without repeating any songs until all have been played. 
#The history of songs played is recorded in the file "*. Sh.his". 
#This history is reset automatically if you added a song to the music library or have already heard all the songs of your library, 
#generating a new random list ever. Whenever you want you can reset the history is deleting the file "*. Sh.his".

#Press "q" to skip song
#Press "p" to pause song and resume song

#------------------------------CONFIGURATION------------------------------------------------------

#mplayer package needed (For debian/Ubuntu/Mint: "$ apt-get install mplayer")

#Select your music library path (all recursive folders will be included in the .mp3 files search):
path="/media/Datos/Música/Music/"

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

while true
do

cadena=$(find "$path" -iname '*.mp3')                                   #search media files
nmedia=$(echo "$cadena" | wc -l)

if [ -f "$0.his" ]                                          #file exist
then
    value=$(<"$0.his")                                      #read file

    if [[ ( $(echo "$value" | sed -n 1p) != $nmedia ) || ( $(echo "$value" | sed -n 2p) == 0 ) ]]   #reset file conditions
    then
        listrand=$(seq 1 $nmedia | shuf)
        index=$nmedia
    else                                                #no reset file conditions
        nmedia=$(echo "$value" | sed -n 1p)
        index=$(echo "$value" | sed -n 2p)
        listrand=$(echo "$value" | sed -n 3p)
        listrand=$(echo "$listrand" | sed s/" "/\\n/g)
    fi  

else                                                    #file not exist
    listrand=$(seq 1 $nmedia | shuf)
    index=$nmedia
fi

nrand=$(echo "$listrand" | sed -n "$index"p)                                #select random number
cadena=$(echo "$cadena" | sed -n "$nrand"p)                             #select song with random number
index=$((index-1))                                          #write file
echo $nmedia > "$0.his"
echo $index >> "$0.his"
echo $listrand >> "$0.his"
mplayer "$cadena"                                           #play media file

done
exit 0
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Though this is interesting, it has little to do with the question - renaming files, not playing music. –  Reinderien Jan 18 at 17:01

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