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I'm no javascript wiz, but am a bit puzzled as to how this is working in three major browsers, but not Safari... is there something wrong with this code? Basically I'm just using this in conjunction with a php/mysql callback at the given url to track link clicks.

Drupal.behaviors.NodeDownloadCounter = function() {

    $('a.ndc-link').click(function() {
        $.post('http://www.pixeledmemories.com/node-download-counter/log/' + this.name);
        return true;
    });

};

Using Drupal behaviors here instead of

$(document).ready(function() {

(correct Drupal method) but I've tried it both ways and it doesn't make a difference.

I've also tried removing "return true", but with no effect.


Okay, further testing reveals that having the click trigger an alert DOES work in Safari:

$('a.ndc-link').click(function() {
    alert('testing (ignore)');
    $.post('http://www.pixeledmemories.com/node-download-counter/log/' + this.name);
    return true;
});

But still nothing being logged to mysql. Here is my callback function:

function node_download_counter_log($nid)
{
    global $user;
  $timestamp = time();
    $title = db_result(db_query("SELECT title FROM {node} WHERE nid = %d", $nid));

  db_query("INSERT INTO {node_download_counter} (nid, title, download_count, last_download, last_uid) VALUES (%d, '%s', %d, %d, %d) 
                    ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE download_count=download_count+1, last_download = %d, last_uid = %d", $nid, $title, 1, $timestamp, $user->uid, $timestamp, $user->uid);

  db_query("INSERT INTO {node_download_counter_log} (nid, title, uid, timestamp) VALUES (%d, '%s', %d, %d)", $nid, $title, $user->uid, $timestamp);

}
share|improve this question
    
why do you have to return true? just curious.. –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 5:59
    
Good question Reigel... like I said, I'm no javascript wiz... I took this basic code from a tutorial that had the "return true" at the end... is in not necessary? –  Jordan Magnuson Jul 5 '10 at 6:12
    
I would check the error console as safari shows the responses that come back from the server in a nice link that you can click and then view what came back. So try returning a value from the ajax call and see if you are getting back the response you expect. –  spinon Jul 5 '10 at 6:23
    
Sorry for my lack of expertise spinon... could you give me a little more detail on how to do what you're suggesting? I really appreciate your help! –  Jordan Magnuson Jul 5 '10 at 6:31
    
can you remove return true;... I think that should not be there... only return false; is mostly use... and that is if you want your page not jumping to other page when clicking that anchor... –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 6:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sounds like the problem is the browser is changing the page before the data post can be finished. You can try adding return false to see if it starts working then. If it does, you are going to need to add a short delay before following the link.

UPDATE: Since it works try adding the following before "return true;"

if(jQuery.browser.safari){
  setTimeout("window.location.href= '"+this.href+"'",500);
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much Aaron! Adding "return false;" does indeed make the code work in Safari... except that the link is of course not actually followed. How exactly should I add a delay to make this work? Also, isn't it a bit weird that Safari seems to deal with posting the information differently than Firefox/Chrome/IE? It does seem odd to have to manually add a delay just for the one browser (when it's obviously preferable to have the page load as fast as possible). –  Jordan Magnuson Jul 5 '10 at 7:22
    
You can selectively add the timeout for just Safari using jQuery.browser.safari. See my edit above. Using Reigel's solution will delay the unloading in all browsers. –  Aaron Harun Jul 5 '10 at 7:27
    
@Aaron - yes setTimeout might work... but to be sure, the OP could use the callback of $.post()... the callback will run after the request of the link in $.post() finishes... and jQuery.browser is now somewhat deprecated ;) –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 7:29
    
@Reigel, and strand all browsers until the post is finished instead of the one with the problem. –  Aaron Harun Jul 5 '10 at 7:30
    
@Aaron - yes it will in all browsers... but it will not be that much... –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 7:32

Okay, based on our conversation on comments above, try

$('a.ndc-link').click(function() {
    var href = this.href;
    $.post('http://www.pixeledmemories.com/node-download-counter/log/' + this.name,
       function() {
           window.location.href = href;
       }
    );
    return false;
});
share|improve this answer
    
And thank you for your solution Reigel, and for all the time you've taken! It works just fine. Hard to know which solution to go with, as all three suggestions work. I think I'm going to go with Aaron's, because of the simplicity, and the fact that it deals with Safari individually, but if you can explain why your solution is better, I'm all ears. Thanks again! –  Jordan Magnuson Jul 5 '10 at 8:18
    
nahh... simplicity is beauty.. you can then change to these other solutions when you met a problem on that one.. :) cheers! but I still say mine is good... –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 8:24

Firs,t you have to be careful not to attach your handler more than once to each 'a.ndc-link', one way to do it is to tag the elements with a custom class.

Drupal.behaviors.NodeDownloadCounter = function() {
    $('a.ndc-link:not(.node-download-counter-processed)').addClass('node-download-counter-processed').click(function(event) {
        // ...
    });
};

One reason I see for this not to work is that, because it closes the page to open the link target, Safari will cancel the $.post request before it is actually sent to the server. Returning false and calling event.preventDefault (event being the first argument of your event handler) should prevent this from happening but will also prevent the browser to actually load the link's target. One way to solve this is to defer the page change until the POST request is complete.

Drupal.behaviors.NodeDownloadCounter = function() {
    $('a.ndc-link:not(.node-download-counter-processed)').addClass('node-download-counter-processed').click(function(event) {
        var link = this;
        event.preventDefault();
        $.post('http://www.pixeledmemories.com/node-download-counter/log/' + this.name, function() {
          window.location.href = link.href;
        });
        return false;
    });
};

But this will only works if there is no error in the POST request.

A better solution would be to hijack the server-side handler for the link target to add the click logging and then call the original handler.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI, event.preventDefault(); are just almost the same with return false... you don't have to do both (in this problem)... –  Reigel Jul 5 '10 at 7:35
    
Thanks for making the point about attaching the handler more than once--completely forgot about that! And thank you for your solution! It works just fine. Hard to know which solution to go with, as all three suggestions work. I think I'm going to go with Aaron's, because of the simplicity, and the fact that it deals with Safari individually, but if you can explain why your solution is better, I'm all ears. Thanks again! –  Jordan Magnuson Jul 5 '10 at 8:17

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