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To create a List, why doesn't Java allow them to be created then elements added one by one?

This works:

public static List<TrackedItem> create(List<Item> items)
{
    TrackedItem[] arr = new TrackedItem[items.size()];

    int i = 0;
    for (Item item : items)
    {
        arr[i] = TrackedItem.createOrUpdate(item);

        i++;
    }

    return java.util.Arrays.asList(arr);
}

This does not work (tracked.add() causes a NullPointerException):

public static List<TrackedItem> create(List<Item> items)
{
    List<TrackedItem> tracked = java.util.Collections.emptyList();

    for (Item item : items)
    {
        tracked.add(TrackedItem.createOrUpdate(item));
    }

    return tracked;
}
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1  
Are you sure that your code throws a NPE? Because it should throw a UnsupportedOperationException because the return value of emptyList() can't be modified (by design). –  Joachim Sauer Jul 5 '10 at 13:06
    
It throws a NullPointerException? Really? It should thrown an UnsupportedOperationException: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/List.html#add(E) –  T.J. Crowder Jul 5 '10 at 13:06
    
@Joachim: Jinx! –  T.J. Crowder Jul 5 '10 at 13:07
    
The answers below are correct, but I tried code similar to the yours and I get UnsupportedOperationException on a call to add() because List is not a concrete type. I'm not sure how you even getting this to get to a point where a NullPointerException can be thrown - there might be something going on in createOrUpdate()... –  Thomas Owens Jul 5 '10 at 13:12
2  
but where is the “new List<T>” from the title?. And is this question really related to generics? –  Carlos Heuberger Jul 5 '10 at 13:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

java.util.Collections.emptyList();

static List emptyList() Returns the empty list (immutable).

That means, you will not be able to change this list.

Its defined:

static List EMPTY_LIST The empty list (immutable).

Quotes from Java sun reference

Edit:

To create a new list you could use e.g.

List myList = new ArrayList<MyClass>();
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+1: The problem here is in attempting to modify the value returned from Collections.emptyList(), nothing to do with generic parameters. –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 5 '10 at 13:04
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Use the following syntax:

public static List<TrackedItem> create(List<Item> items)
{
    List<TrackedItem> tracked = new ArrayList<TrackedItem>();

    for (Item item : items)
    {
        tracked.add(TrackedItem.createOrUpdate(item));
    }

    return tracked;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
NB You need to instantiate a list of a specific type (in this case ArrayList, could also have been LinkedList, etc.) to which you can add your items. –  Marc van Kempen Jul 5 '10 at 13:04
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This might be a misunderstanding.

Even if it is called emptyList, it isn't a list which is just empty and ready to be populated. This emptyList is designed to be empty at all times. You can't add to this special list.

To get a 'usable' empty list you can either

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();  // create a new one or
list.add("if you have an list");
list.clear();                                 // just clear it
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create a new arrayList by :

List<T> tracked = new ArrayList<T>();

List is only an interface ... you can't make a new one. you only can implement it.

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