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How do I set environment variables from Java? I see that I can do this for subprocesses using ProcessBuilder. I have several subprocesses to start, though, so I'd rather modify the current process's environment and let the subprocesses inherit it.

There's a System.getenv(String) for getting a single environment variable. I can also get a Map of the complete set of environment variables with System.getenv(). But calling put() on that Map throws an UnsupportedOperationException -- apparently they mean for the environment to be read only. And there's no System.setenv().

So, is there any way to set environment variables in the currently running process? If so, how? If not, what's the rationale? (Is it because this is Java and therefore I shouldn't be doing evil nonportable obsolete things like touching my environment?) And if not, any good suggestions for managing the environment variable changes that I'm going to need to be feeding to several subprocesses?

share|improve this question
    
System.getEnv() is intended to be universal-ish, some environments don't even have environment variables. – b1nary.atr0phy May 12 '12 at 0:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 49 down vote accepted

(Is it because this is Java and therefore I shouldn't be doing evil nonportable obsolete things like touching my environment?)

I think you've hit the nail on the head.

A possible way to ease the burden would be to factor out a method

void setUpEnvironment(ProcessBuilder builder) {
    Map<String, String> env = builder.environment();
    // blah blah
}

and pass any ProcessBuilders through it before starting them.

Also, you probably already know this, but you can start more than one process with the same ProcessBuilder. So if your subprocesses are the same, you don't need to do this setup over and over.

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1  
It's a shame management won't let me use a different portable language for running this set of evil, obsolete subprocesses, then. :) – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 17:47
    
@skiphoppy: no tool can set the parent's environment -- it's not a tool issue, it's an OS issue. – S.Lott Nov 25 '08 at 18:04
9  
S.Lott, I'm not looking to set a parent's environment. I'm looking to set my own environment. – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 18:06
    
Thanks, mmyers. I think I'm definitely going to have to factor out such a method. I already have a ProcessUtils class, so it's going to have to grow to manage changes to the environment. – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 18:07
12  
@b1naryatr0phy You missed the point. Nobody can play with your environment variables since those variables are local to a process (what you set in Windows are the default values). Each process is free to change its own variables... unless its Java. – maaartinus Jun 29 '12 at 0:36

For use in scenarios where you need to set specific environment values for unit tests, you might find the following hack useful. It will change the environment variables throughout the JVM (so make sure you reset any changes after your test), but will not alter your system environment.

I found that a combination of the two dirty hacks by Edward Campbell and anonymous works best, as one of the does not work under linux, one does not work under windows 7. So to get a multiplatform evil hack I combined them:

protected static void setEnv(Map<String, String> newenv)
{
  try
    {
        Class<?> processEnvironmentClass = Class.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment");
        Field theEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theEnvironment");
        theEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);
        Map<String, String> env = (Map<String, String>) theEnvironmentField.get(null);
        env.putAll(newenv);
        Field theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theCaseInsensitiveEnvironment");
        theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);
        Map<String, String> cienv = (Map<String, String>)     theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.get(null);
        cienv.putAll(newenv);
    }
    catch (NoSuchFieldException e)
    {
      try {
        Class[] classes = Collections.class.getDeclaredClasses();
        Map<String, String> env = System.getenv();
        for(Class cl : classes) {
            if("java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap".equals(cl.getName())) {
                Field field = cl.getDeclaredField("m");
                field.setAccessible(true);
                Object obj = field.get(env);
                Map<String, String> map = (Map<String, String>) obj;
                map.clear();
                map.putAll(newenv);
            }
        }
      } catch (Exception e2) {
        e2.printStackTrace();
      }
    } catch (Exception e1) {
        e1.printStackTrace();
    } 
}

This Works like a charm. Full credits to the two authors of these hacks.

share|improve this answer
12  
This will only change the environment variable in memory. This is good for testing, because you can set the environment variable as necessary for your test, but leave the envs in the system as they are. In fact, I would strongly discourage anyone from using this code for any other purpose than testing. This code is evil ;-) – pushy Jun 25 '12 at 8:09
2  
As an FYI, the JVM creates a copy of the environment variables when it starts. This will edit that copy, not the environment variables for the parent process that started the JVM. – bmeding Aug 15 '12 at 14:12
17  
upvoted for sheer dirtiness – Epaga Sep 20 '12 at 12:05
1  
can anybody please tell the import package for the type Field ??? – Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Jan 18 '13 at 13:00
2  
Sure, import java.lang.reflect.Field; – pushy Jan 21 '13 at 9:44
public static void set(Map<String, String> newenv) throws Exception {
    Class[] classes = Collections.class.getDeclaredClasses();
    Map<String, String> env = System.getenv();
    for(Class cl : classes) {
        if("java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap".equals(cl.getName())) {
            Field field = cl.getDeclaredField("m");
            field.setAccessible(true);
            Object obj = field.get(env);
            Map<String, String> map = (Map<String, String>) obj;
            map.clear();
            map.putAll(newenv);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Dude ... does it really work??? – skiphoppy Jan 30 '09 at 21:08
1  
It sounds like that would modify the map in memory, but would it save the value to the system? – Jon Onstott Dec 5 '09 at 17:53
    
well it does change the memory map of environment variables. i guess that suffices in a whole lot of use-cases. @Edward - gosh, it's hard to imagine how this solution was figured out in the first place! – anirvan Jul 27 '10 at 12:53
5  
This won't change the environment variables on the system, but will change them in the current invocation of Java. This is very useful for unit testing. – Stuart K Feb 14 '11 at 14:07
6  
why not use Class<?> cl = env.getClass(); instead of that for loop? – thejoshwolfe May 9 '12 at 3:00
  // this is a dirty hack - but should be ok for a unittest.
  private void setNewEnvironmentHack(Map<String, String> newenv) throws Exception
  {
    Class<?> processEnvironmentClass = Class.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment");
    Field theEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theEnvironment");
    theEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);
    Map<String, String> env = (Map<String, String>) theEnvironmentField.get(null);
    env.clear();
    env.putAll(newenv);
    Field theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theCaseInsensitiveEnvironment");
    theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);
    Map<String, String> cienv = (Map<String, String>) theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.get(null);
    cienv.clear();
    cienv.putAll(newenv);
  }
share|improve this answer

on Android the interface is exposed via Libcore.os as a kind of hidden API.

Libcore.os.setenv("VAR", "value", bOverwrite);
Libcore.os.getenv("VAR"));

The Libcore class as well as the interface OS is public. Just the class declaration is missing and need to be shown to the linker. No need to add the classes to the application, but it also does not hurt if it is included.

package libcore.io;

public final class Libcore {
    private Libcore() { }

    public static Os os;
}

package libcore.io;

public interface Os {
    public String getenv(String name);
    public void setenv(String name, String value, boolean overwrite) throws ErrnoException;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Tested and working on Android 4.4.4 (CM11). P.S. The only adjustment I made was replacing throws ErrnoException with throws Exception. – DavisNT Aug 23 '14 at 11:50
3  
API 21, has Os.setEnv now. developer.android.com/reference/android/system/…, java.lang.String, boolean) – Jared Burrows Jun 21 '15 at 4:24
    
Added only in API 18: android-review.googlesource.com/#/c/46057 – Enyby Feb 21 at 5:26

Poking around online, it looks like it might be possible to do this with JNI. You'd then have to make a call to putenv() from C, and you'd (presumably) have to do it in a way that worked on both Windows and UNIX.

If all that can be done, it surely wouldn't be too hard for Java itself to support this instead of putting me in a straight jacket.

A Perl-speaking friend elsewhere suggests that this is because environment variables are process global and Java is striving for good isolation for good design.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you can set the processes environment from C code. But I wouldn't count on that working in Java. There is a good chance that the JVM copies the environment into Java String objects during startup, so your changes would not be used for future JVM operations. – Darron Nov 25 '08 at 21:09
    
Thanks for the warning, Darron. There's probably a good chance you're right. – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 21:10
2  
@Darron many of the reasons one would want to do this have nothing at all to do with what the JVM thinks the environment is. (Think of setting LD_LIBRARY_PATH before calling Runtime.loadLibrary(); the dlopen() call it invokes looks at the real environment, not at Java's idea of same). – Charles Duffy Oct 29 '13 at 14:55
    
This works for subprocesses started by a native library (which in my case is most of them), but unfortunately does not work for subprocesses started by Java's Process or ProcessBuilder classes. – Dan Aug 8 '14 at 20:33

Tried pushy's answer above and it worked for the most part. However, in certain circumstances, I would see this exception:

java.lang.String cannot be cast to java.lang.ProcessEnvironment$Variable

This turns out to happen when the method was called more than once, owing to the implementation of certain inner classes of ProcessEnvironment. If the setEnv(..) method is called more than once, when the keys are retrieved from the theEnvironment map, they are now strings (having been put in as strings by the first invocation of setEnv(...) ) and cannot be cast to the map's generic type, Variable, which is a private inner class of ProcessEnvironment.

A fixed version (in Scala), is below. Hopefully it isn't too difficult to carry over into Java.

def setEnv(newenv: java.util.Map[String, String]): Unit = {
  try {
    val processEnvironmentClass = JavaClass.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment")
    val theEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theEnvironment")
    theEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true)

    val variableClass = JavaClass.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment$Variable")
    val convertToVariable = variableClass.getMethod("valueOf", classOf[java.lang.String])
    convertToVariable.setAccessible(true)

    val valueClass = JavaClass.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment$Value")
    val convertToValue = valueClass.getMethod("valueOf", classOf[java.lang.String])
    convertToValue.setAccessible(true)

    val sampleVariable = convertToVariable.invoke(null, "")
    val sampleValue = convertToValue.invoke(null, "")
    val env = theEnvironmentField.get(null).asInstanceOf[java.util.Map[sampleVariable.type, sampleValue.type]]
    newenv.foreach { case (k, v) => {
        val variable = convertToVariable.invoke(null, k).asInstanceOf[sampleVariable.type]
        val value = convertToValue.invoke(null, v).asInstanceOf[sampleValue.type]
        env.put(variable, value)
      }
    }

    val theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theCaseInsensitiveEnvironment")
    theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true)
    val cienv = theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.get(null).asInstanceOf[java.util.Map[String, String]]
    cienv.putAll(newenv);
  }
  catch {
    case e : NoSuchFieldException => {
      try {
        val classes = classOf[java.util.Collections].getDeclaredClasses
        val env = System.getenv()
        classes foreach (cl => {
          if("java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap" == cl.getName) {
            val field = cl.getDeclaredField("m")
            field.setAccessible(true)
            val map = field.get(env).asInstanceOf[java.util.Map[String, String]]
            // map.clear() // Not sure why this was in the code. It means we need to set all required environment variables.
            map.putAll(newenv)
          }
        })
      } catch {
        case e2: Exception => e2.printStackTrace()
      }
    }
    case e1: Exception => e1.printStackTrace()
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where is JavaClass defined? – Mike Slinn Dec 20 '14 at 0:00

It turns out that the solution from @pushy/@anonymous/@Edward Campbell does not work on Android because Android is not really Java. Specifically, Android does not have java.lang.ProcessEnvironment at all. But it turns out to be easier in Android, you just need to do a JNI call to POSIX setenv():

In C/JNI:

JNIEXPORT jint JNICALL Java_com_example_posixtest_Posix_setenv
  (JNIEnv* env, jclass clazz, jstring key, jstring value, jboolean overwrite)
{
    char* k = (char *) (*env)->GetStringUTFChars(env, key, NULL);
    char* v = (char *) (*env)->GetStringUTFChars(env, value, NULL);
    int err = setenv(k, v, overwrite);
    (*env)->ReleaseStringUTFChars(env, key, k);
    (*env)->ReleaseStringUTFChars(env, value, v);
    return err;
}

And in Java:

public class Posix {

    public static native int setenv(String key, String value, boolean overwrite);

    private void runTest() {
        Posix.setenv("LD_LIBRARY_PATH", "foo", true);
    }
}
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The only non-hacky answer is this. – WindRider Apr 18 at 7:23

This is a combination of @paul-blair 's answer converted to Java which includes some cleanups pointed out by paul blair and some mistakes that seem to have been inside @pushy 's code which is made up of @Edward Campbell and anonymous.

I cannot emphasize how much this code should ONLY be used in testing and is extremely hacky. But for cases where you need the environment setup in tests it is exactly what I needed.

This also includes some minor touches of mine that allow the code to work on both Windows running on

java version "1.8.0_92"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_92-b14)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.92-b14, mixed mode)

as well as Centos running on

openjdk version "1.8.0_91"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_91-b14)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.91-b14, mixed mode)

The implementation:

/**
 * Sets an environment variable FOR THE CURRENT RUN OF THE JVM
 * Does not actually modify the system's environment variables,
 *  but rather only the copy of the variables that java has taken,
 *  and hence should only be used for testing purposes!
 * @param key The Name of the variable to set
 * @param value The value of the variable to set
 */
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <K,V> void setenv(final String key, final String value) {
    try {
        /// we obtain the actual environment
        final Class<?> processEnvironmentClass = Class.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment");
        final Field theEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theEnvironment");
        final boolean environmentAccessibility = theEnvironmentField.isAccessible();
        theEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);

        final Map<K,V> env = (Map<K, V>) theEnvironmentField.get(null);

        if (SystemUtils.IS_OS_WINDOWS) {
            // This is all that is needed on windows running java jdk 1.8.0_92
            if (value == null) {
                env.remove(key);
            } else {
                env.put((K) key, (V) value);
            }
        } else {
            // This is triggered to work on openjdk 1.8.0_91
            // The ProcessEnvironment$Variable is the key of the map
            final Class<K> variableClass = (Class<K>) Class.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment$Variable");
            final Method convertToVariable = variableClass.getMethod("valueOf", String.class);
            final boolean conversionVariableAccessibility = convertToVariable.isAccessible();
            convertToVariable.setAccessible(true);

            // The ProcessEnvironment$Value is the value fo the map
            final Class<V> valueClass = (Class<V>) Class.forName("java.lang.ProcessEnvironment$Value");
            final Method convertToValue = valueClass.getMethod("valueOf", String.class);
            final boolean conversionValueAccessibility = convertToValue.isAccessible();
            convertToValue.setAccessible(true);

            if (value == null) {
                env.remove(convertToVariable.invoke(null, key));
            } else {
                // we place the new value inside the map after conversion so as to
                // avoid class cast exceptions when rerunning this code
                env.put((K) convertToVariable.invoke(null, key), (V) convertToValue.invoke(null, value));

                // reset accessibility to what they were
                convertToValue.setAccessible(conversionValueAccessibility);
                convertToVariable.setAccessible(conversionVariableAccessibility);
            }
        }
        // reset environment accessibility
        theEnvironmentField.setAccessible(environmentAccessibility);

        // we apply the same to the case insensitive environment
        final Field theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField = processEnvironmentClass.getDeclaredField("theCaseInsensitiveEnvironment");
        final boolean insensitiveAccessibility = theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.isAccessible();
        theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.setAccessible(true);
        // Not entirely sure if this needs to be casted to ProcessEnvironment$Variable and $Value as well
        final Map<String, String> cienv = (Map<String, String>) theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.get(null);
        if (value == null) {
            // remove if null
            cienv.remove(key);
        } else {
            cienv.put(key, value);
        }
        theCaseInsensitiveEnvironmentField.setAccessible(insensitiveAccessibility);
    } catch (final ClassNotFoundException | NoSuchMethodException | IllegalAccessException | InvocationTargetException e) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Failed setting environment variable <"+key+"> to <"+value+">", e);
    } catch (final NoSuchFieldException e) {
        // we could not find theEnvironment
        final Map<String, String> env = System.getenv();
        Stream.of(Collections.class.getDeclaredClasses())
                // obtain the declared classes of type $UnmodifiableMap
                .filter(c1 -> "java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap".equals(c1.getName()))
                .map(c1 -> {
                    try {
                        return c1.getDeclaredField("m");
                    } catch (final NoSuchFieldException e1) {
                        throw new IllegalStateException("Failed setting environment variable <"+key+"> to <"+value+"> when locating in-class memory map of environment", e1);
                    }
                })
                .forEach(field -> {
                    try {
                        final boolean fieldAccessibility = field.isAccessible();
                        field.setAccessible(true);
                        // we obtain the environment
                        final Map<String, String> map = (Map<String, String>) field.get(env);
                        if (value == null) {
                            // remove if null
                            map.remove(key);
                        } else {
                            map.put(key, value);
                        }
                        // reset accessibility
                        field.setAccessible(fieldAccessibility);
                    } catch (final ConcurrentModificationException e1) {
                        // This may happen if we keep backups of the environment before calling this method
                        // as the map that we kept as a backup may be picked up inside this block.
                        // So we simply skip this attempt and continue adjusting the other maps
                        // To avoid this one should always keep individual keys/value backups not the entire map
                        LOGGER.info("Attempted to modify source map: "+field.getDeclaringClass()+"#"+field.getName(), e1);
                    } catch (final IllegalAccessException e1) {
                        throw new IllegalStateException("Failed setting environment variable <"+key+"> to <"+value+">. Unable to access field!", e1);
                    }
                });
    }
    LOGGER.info("Set environment variable <"+key+"> to <"+value+">. Sanity Check: "+System.getenv(key));
}
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You can pass parameters into your initial java process with -D:

java -cp <classpath> -Dkey1=value -Dkey2=value ...
share|improve this answer
    
The values are not known at execution time; they become known during the program's execution when the user provides/selects them. And that sets only system properties, not environment variables. – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 17:45
    
Then in that case you probably want to find a regular way (via the args[] parameter to the main method) to invoke your subprocesses. – matt b Nov 25 '08 at 17:53
    
matt b, the regular way is via ProcessBuilder, as mentioned in my original question. :) – skiphoppy Nov 25 '08 at 18:08
7  
-D parameters are available through System.getProperty and are not the same as System.getenv. Besides, the System class also allows to set these properties statically using setProperty – anirvan Jul 28 '10 at 7:14

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