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I am writing a c++ program on Linux (Ubuntu). I would like to delete the contents of a directory. It can be loose files or sub-directories.

Essentially, i would like to do something equivalent to

rm -rf <path-to-directory>/*

Can you suggest the best way of doing this in c++ along with the required headers. Is it possible to do this with sys/stat.h or sys/types.h or sys/dir.h ?!

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3 Answers 3

Use the nftw() (File Tree Walk) function, with the FTW_DEPTH flag. Provide a callback that just calls remove() on the passed file:

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 500
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ftw.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int unlink_cb(const char *fpath, const struct stat *sb, int typeflag, struct FTW *ftwbuf)
{
    int rv = remove(fpath);

    if (rv)
        perror(fpath);

    return rv;
}

int rmrf(char *path)
{
    return nftw(path, unlink_cb, 64, FTW_DEPTH | FTW_PHYS);
}

If you don't want to remove the base directory itself, change the unlink_cb() function to check the level:

int unlink_cb(const char *fpath, const struct stat *sb, int typeflag, struct FTW *ftwbuf)
{
    int rv;

    if (ftwbuf->level == 0)
        return 0;

    rv = remove(fpath);

    if (rv)
        perror(fpath);

    return rv;
}
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2  
You should also add the FTW_PHYS flag to correctly handle symbolic links (meaning don't follow them). –  divegeek Dec 29 '10 at 5:58
    
@divegeek: Agreed, edited. –  caf Dec 29 '10 at 6:07
    
What plays the role of "-f" in this code? What if you just want a regular "rm -r"? –  static_rtti Oct 29 '14 at 14:51
    
@static_rtti: If you just want regular -r then you need to specifically check for unwriteable files and prompt the user whether to remove them. –  caf Nov 1 '14 at 12:34
system ("rm -rf <path-to-directory>");
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1  
big giant whopping safety risk –  sehe Apr 13 '11 at 22:30
1  
That's not a security risk, any more than the question is. OP asked for the equivalent of rm -rf <path-to-directory>/* which this pretty much is (other than the fact it will remove the top-level directory as well). –  paxdiablo Nov 2 '11 at 8:38
    
Just came across this post. Why is this a security risk? –  Ram Bhat May 19 '12 at 19:48
    
Ram Bhat, it's not a security risk. sehe calls it a "safety" risk, probably referring to the possibility that you might accidentally type something like "sudo rm -rf /" while you meant to do something else –  Boinst Oct 3 '12 at 1:24
1  
It's a security risk, if the user can control the argument, which could be something like foo; echo 'command injection 101' –  domen Jul 21 '14 at 10:07

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