Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a database that hold's a user's optional profile. In the profile I have strings, char (for M or F) and ints.

I ran into an issue where I try to put the sex of the user into the property of my Profile object, and the application crashes because it doesn't know how to handle a returned null value.

I've tried casting the data to the appropriate type

char sex = (char)dt.Rows[0]["Sex"];

Which didn't fix my problem. I then tried changing the types to Nullable and Nullable and get conversion issues all the same. My current solution that I was able to find is the following:

object.sex = null;  
if(dt.Rows[0]["Sex"] != DBNull.Value)
      object.sex = (char)dt.Rows[0]["Sex"];
object.WorkExt = null;
if(dt.Rows[0]["WorkExt"] != DBNull.Value)
      object.WorkExt = (int)dt.Rows[0]["WorkExt"];

Is there a simpler or better way to do this? Or am I pretty much on the right track?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

rotard's answer (use Is<ColumnName>Null()) only works for typed data sets.

For untyped data sets, you have to use one of the patterns in the following code. If this code isn't definitive, let me know and I'll edit it until it is. This is an extremely common question that there should really be only one right answer to.

using System.
using System.Data;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt.Columns.Add("test", typeof (char));
        dt.Columns["test"].AllowDBNull = true;

        DataRow dr = dt.Rows.Add();
        char? test;

        try
        {
            test = (char?)dr["test"];
        }
        catch (InvalidCastException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Simply casting to a nullable type doesn't work.");
        }

        test  = dr.Field<char?>("test");
        if (test == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("The Field extension method in .NET 3.5 converts System.DBNull to null.");                
        }

        test = (dr["test"] is DBNull) ? null : (char?) dr["test"];
        if (test == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Before .NET 3.5, you have to check the type of the column's value.");
        }

        test = (dr["test"] == DBNull.Value) ? null : (char?) dr["test"];
        if (test == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Comparing the field's value to DBNull.Value is very marginally faster, but takes a bit more code.");
        }

        // now let's put the data back

        try
        {
            dr["test"] = test;
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You can't set nullable columns to null.");
        }

        dr.SetField("test", test);
        if (dr["test"] is DBNull)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Again, in .NET 3.5 extension methods make this relatively easy.");
        }

        dr["test"] = (object)test ?? DBNull.Value;
        if (dr["test"] is DBNull)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Before .NET 3.5, you can use the null coalescing operator, but note the awful cast required.");
        }


        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

nullable types were designed just for this purpose! use 'as char?' instead of '(char?)'

class Foo {
    char? sex;
}
Foo object;

object.sex = dt.Rows[0]["Sex"] as char?;
share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, this is not what nullable types were designed for, as you'll find if you test that code. If a DataColumn has AllowDBNull set, a null value in that column is DBNull.Value, not null. Your code throws an InvalidCastException. –  Robert Rossney Nov 25 '08 at 21:49
    
since when did 'as' throw an InvalidCastException? –  Jimmy Nov 25 '08 at 22:23
    
I just didn't see that "as" bit. I'm clearly losing it. –  Robert Rossney Nov 26 '08 at 8:01

A decent discussion on this is at http://stackoverflow.com/questions/221582/most-efficient-way-to-check-for-dbnull-and-then-assign-to-a-variable.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a little different, because that doesn't overwrite existing values with DBNull –  Jimmy Nov 25 '08 at 21:08

Is dt an ADO.Net 2 data table? Can you not do something like:

if(dt.Rows[0].IsSexNull()) {} else {}

? Also, assuming you have control over your database, would it not make more sense to use a bit, rather than a string?

share|improve this answer
    
There are confused people out there who really don't know how to answer that question, and others who just don't like to tell you. You can lump those groups together, but at least a third option is needed. –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 25 '08 at 20:15
    
True, false, or null ftw –  Jimmy Nov 25 '08 at 22:40
    
The obvious problem with using a bit is that even if Sex is a binary choice, it's not self-evident what True and False mean. Also, it's not even a ternary choice in a lot of systems: one I'm using supports Male, Female, Unknown, and Decline to State. And NULL, which is not the same as "Unknown". –  Robert Rossney Nov 27 '08 at 1:26

how about:

    internal static T CastTo<T>(object value)
    {
        return value != DBNull.Value ? (T)value : default(T);
    }

and then use it like:

        return new EquipmentDetails(
            CastTo<int>(reader["ID"]),
            CastTo<int>(reader["CategoryID"]),
            CastTo<string>(reader["Description"]));

etc...

share|improve this answer

I would do it pretty much like you did. I would write a function for it:

Something that does:

object.sex = handle(dt.Rows[0]["Sex"]);

And in handle you do the ==DBNull.Value check.

share|improve this answer
    
That only works if your function returns an object, and you cast the return value to char? in the assignment. The Field methods in .NET 3.5's DataRow extensions do this for you. –  Robert Rossney Nov 25 '08 at 22:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.