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I am going to be working on a bit of C# code own my own but I want to make sure that I follow the most widely accepted naming conventions incase I want to bring on other developers, release my code, or sell my code. Right now I am following the naming convention that Microsoft has set as they seem to be the most widely accepted. The one thing they don't mention though is naming for private fields. For the most part I have seen them named in camelCase like protected fields however that present me with an issue as parameter names should be in camelCase. Take the following constructor for example:

public GameItem(string baseName, string prefixName, string suffixName)
{
    //initialize code
}

Now if I use camelCase for the private fields too there is a naming conflict unless I use "this" in order to access the class fields (which I think is against most standards not to mention means more typing). One solution is to give the parameter a different name but that does not make logical sense to give the same data 2 different names. The only other solution that I know of that was common in C++ coding is giving private members an underscore at the beginning. Is that solution commonly accepted with C# coding? Is there another solution to this problem (like only using properties (which use PascalCase) to access fields, even in the class itself)?

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1  
8  
Choose one and be consistent! That's what matters... –  João Angelo Jul 6 '10 at 14:04
4  
I use "this" for private fields. –  gooch Jul 6 '10 at 14:05
    
I use either this or public properties with protected set and those have first letter capital. Check out M$ FxCop if you can. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 6 '10 at 14:16
1  
Starting to think about it more and it might make more sense to just access them through properties all the times. Two reasons I am think this is that 1. Consistency throughout all the code on how to access fields and 2. If need to add validation checking, I would have to switch all my code to use properties anyways so might as well do it beforehand. What do you think using properties all the time? –  ryanzec Jul 6 '10 at 18:24

12 Answers 12

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Follow the Microsoft Naming Guidelines. The guidelines for field usage indicate that it should be camelCase and not be prefixed. Note that the general rule is no prefix; the specific rule is not to prefix to distinguish between static and non-static fields.

Do not apply a prefix to field names or static field names. Specifically, do not apply a prefix to a field name to distinguish between static and nonstatic fields. For example, applying a g_ or s_ prefix is incorrect.

and (from General Naming Conventions)

Do not use underscores, hyphens, or any other nonalphanumeric characters.

EDIT: I will note that the docs are not specific with regard to private fields but indicate that protected fields should be camelCase only. I suppose you could infer from this that any convention for private fields is acceptable. Certainly public static fields differ from protected (they are capitalized). My personal opinion is that protected/private are not sufficiently different in scope to warrant a difference in naming convention, especially as all you seem to want to do is differentiate them from parameters. That is, if you follow the guidelines for protected fields, you'd have to treat them differently in this respect than private fields in order to distinguish them from parameters. I use this when referring to class members within the class to make the distinction clear.

EDIT 2

I've adopted the convention used at my current job, which is to prefix private instance variables with an underscore and generally only expose protected instance variables as properties using PascalCase (typically autoproperties). It wasn't my personal preference but it's one that I've become comfortable with and probably will follow until something better comes along.

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4  
The naming guidelines are only concerned about identifiers visible to the outside. –  Martin Liversage Jul 6 '10 at 14:12
    
@Martin - I would agree with you, but see my updated answer. –  tvanfosson Jul 6 '10 at 14:17
    
OK what is more correct: this.employee this._employee or this.m_employee? –  hellboy Oct 1 '13 at 15:51
    
@hellboy see my update I now use an underscore prefix and don't typically use this. anymore –  tvanfosson Oct 1 '13 at 16:33

_camelCase for fields is common from what I've seen (it's what we use).

My personal justification for using this standard is that is is easier to type _ to identify a private field than this.

For example:

void Foo(String a, String b)
{
    _a = a;
    _b = b;
}

Versus

void Foo(String a, String b)
{
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
}

I find the first much easier to type and it prevents me from ever accidentally assigning to the parameter called a instead of this.a. This is reinforced by a Code Analysis Maintainability Rule that states:

  • CA1500 Variable names should not match field names.

My other reason, is that this. is optional (resharper prompts you to remove them) if it doesn't collide with a local variable or parameter name, making knowing which variable you are using harder. If you have an _ at the start of all private fields, then you always know which is a field and which is has local scope.

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The underscore is a great identifier for me as well. I typically use m_camelCase –  gooch Jul 6 '10 at 14:03
6  
_camelCase for private fields is not suggested by Microsoft (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ta31s3bc(v=VS.71).aspx). In case of naming conflicts between class and method scope, you can use the this keyword to refer to the class member. This is also what Resharper suggests by default... –  Koen Jul 6 '10 at 14:52
    
I agree with the use of the _camelCase for module level variables or property variables. But as João Angelo said already the most important thing is to be consistent. It's not about what the standards are it's that you have them and enforce them. Koen - Resharper (certainly in v5) uses _camelCase. –  Darren Lewis Jul 6 '10 at 18:50
3  
_We _don't _need _your _underscores _here –  Callum Rogers Jul 7 '10 at 9:55
1  
If you enable .NET Framework source stepping, or if you use a CLI decompiler tool (such as Reflector or ILSpy) to look at the framework sources, you will notice that even Microsoft has started following this guideline from .NET 3.0+. –  Paolo Moretti Jul 24 '12 at 13:10

Generally there are two widely used ways to name fields (always using camelCase):

Using an underscore prefix

void F(String someValue) {
  _someValue = someValue;
}

Using this. to access the field and avoid name conflicts

void F(String someValue) {
  this.someValue = someValue;
}

Personally I prefer the later, but I will use whatever convention is set forth by the organization I work for.

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In our shop, we started our first C# project using Microsoft's suggested guideline for private members, i.e.

camelCaseFieldName

But we soon ran into confusion between private members and parameters, and switched to

_camelCaseFieldName

which has worked much better for us.

A private member usually has a state that persists outside of a method call - the leading underscore tends to remind you of that.

Also note that using AutoVariable syntax for properties can minimize the need for private backing fields, i.e.

public int PascalCaseFieldName { get; set;}

For a nice concise set of standards that (mostly) follow the MS guidelines, check out net-naming-conventions-and-programming-standards---best-practices

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The most important thing is to pick one standard and stick with it. Check out iDesign's C# Coding Standard at IDesign (it's a link on the right side). It's a great document that covers things like naming guidelines. They recommend using camel case for both local variables and method arguments.

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Our .NET dev teams the IDesign coding standards as well. Juwal can't be wrong, right? :) –  Riaan Jul 6 '10 at 14:55

Philips Healtcare C# Coding Standard

MSDN - Eric Gunnerson

Edit: I use "this" keyword to access non-static members in C# and Java.

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Following Microsoft's naming conventions, private fields should be prefixed with an underscore.

For example:

private int _myValue;

Good luck!

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Identifiers should not contain underscores (it's one of the warnings from FxCop). –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 6 '10 at 14:12
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It's recommended by Microsoft in their best practice guide. –  Ian P Jul 6 '10 at 14:14
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FxCop doesn't care about internal identifiers but what's good for external usage should be good for internal one. Also, the underscores look ugly (IMHO). Underscore prefix did not work for some languages that were to be integrated into framework and for interop. Also having a class with 15 private fields named _whatever slows intellisense-typing down. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 6 '10 at 14:24
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@Ian P: I do not see the recommendation to use underscore prefixes anywhere. Convention only mentions underscores to not use them in classes and such. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 7 '10 at 7:55
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I have found the practice not to use prefixes: Do not apply a prefix to field names or static field names. Specifically, do not apply a prefix to a field name to distinguish between static and nonstatic fields. For example, applying a g_ or s_ prefix is incorrect. They do not mention non-public fields specifically, but you get the point. link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ta31s3bc.aspx –  Jaroslav Jandek Jul 7 '10 at 8:01

The convention I use to distinguish between private class variables and method parameters is:

private string baseName;
private string prefixName;
private string suffixName;

public GameItem(string baseName, string prefixName, string suffixName)
{
    this.baseName = baseName;
    this.prefixName = prefixName;
    this.suffixName = suffixName;
}
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We use StyleCop to force consistency throughout our code. StyleCop is used within Microsoft enforce a common set of best practices for layout, readability, maintainability, and documentation of C# source code.

You can run StyleCop at build time and have it generate warnings for style violations.

To answer your specific question, private fields should be in camelCase and prefixed with "this".

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Have a look at ReSharper. It will underline all the places where your names do not confirm to ordinary guidelines, and you can customize it. Plus, of course there's loads and loads of other productivity enhancements.

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I do this; it's pretty much in line with MSDN.

class MyClass : MyBaseClass, IMyInterface
{
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;
    int m_MyField = 1;
    int MyProperty {
        get {
            return m_MyField;
        }
        set {
            m_MyField = value;
        }
    }

    void MyMethod(int myParameter) {
        int _MyLocalVaraible = myParameter;
        MyProperty = _MyLocalVaraible;
        MyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

Here's a little more detail: http://jerrytech.blogspot.com/2009/09/simple-c-naming-convention.html

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I think this was in the guidelines ages ago... at the moment, it definitely is not! I also dislike the implicit access modifiers. –  Jowen Jul 15 '13 at 14:41
    
Yeah, it's true. Most coders skip _, m_, and s_ prefixes. Anymore, nobody can't tell the scope of a var by its name. Fact is, most coders have reduced their naming to thisName and ThisName and nothing else. To me, it's not right. But I accept it's most common. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jul 19 '13 at 17:56
private string baseName; 
private string prefixName; 
private string suffixName; 

public GameItem(string _baseName, string _prefixName, string _suffixName) 
{ 
    this.baseName = _baseName; 
    this.prefixName = _prefixName; 
    this.suffixName = _suffixName; 
} 
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5  
-1. This convention is not posted as best practice anywhere I've seen, and the post is very poorly formatted. On a more personal level, I think the _'s in the method signature significantly clutters the code, and since it is used there and not in the private accessors, it will be visible all over the client classes too, and not just in your code. –  Tomas Lycken Jul 6 '10 at 14:26
    
In addition to adding visual complexity to the parameter names, "_" is often used to denote "private" in other programming contexts. Parameter names are part of the public method signature and, thus, should not use an underscore prefix. Also, little differentiates a method parameter from a local variable, so using an underscore for one and no underscore for the other (or, worse, also for local variables) is inconsistent. –  Matt Stoker Dec 19 '13 at 22:46

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