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I have an enumeration MyEnum (Neg -1; None 0; Pos 1).

I use the result of CompareTo() to initialize a object of that enum.

What is the most performant way in .NET to do it (Negative to -1, 0 to 0, Positive to 1)?

NB.
CompareTo() returns an Integer value..

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x / Math.abs(x) –  knittl Jul 6 '10 at 14:11
2  
@knittl : do you think the division is the most performant? –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:12
9  
@knittl does .NET map 0/0 to 0? –  Jeriko Jul 6 '10 at 14:13
2  
@manixrock: I am not sure about "always". MSDN tells about: "less than 0": msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:27
3  
If you want "the most performant" method, you need to test the various options. Take a look at the System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class to measure each. –  Hans Kesting Jul 6 '10 at 14:30

9 Answers 9

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Have a look at Math.Sign

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this method shows best results, according to the test results bellow. –  serhio Jul 7 '10 at 12:47

there's a builtin method called Math.Sign in the .net framework

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As @Henrik and @knittl have said you should use Math.Sign. But if you're interested as to what the .Net framework is doing behind the scenes the following code has come out of Reflector.

public static int Sign(int value)
{
  if (value < 0)
  {
    return -1;
  }
  if (value > 0)
  {
    return 1;
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am interested in the most performant method. Does the custom function behave quicker that the built-in one? –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:24
8  
premature optimization is the root of all evil –  knittl Jul 6 '10 at 14:26
1  
serhio, the function above IS the built-in one. –  Lirik Jul 6 '10 at 15:12
    
see test results bellow –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 15:37
Math.Sign(value)
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Result of CompareTo is negative, zero, or positive. If you look at the other answers, Math.Sign uses 2 if statements to return an int.

Just re-code Math.Sign to return your enum.

(If this was not homework I would give a code example there, but you are supposed to learn from it).

After that, test it, to see what is the most performant.

share|improve this answer
    
Stevo3000 gave an example. –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:29
    
However, a code example would be appreciated. –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:37
1  
In the time you spend waiting for an answer, you could have created 10 code examples yourself, done 20 things wrong, and so learned 20 things that are not in any code example ;-) –  GvS Jul 6 '10 at 15:22
    
see test results bellow :) thanks. –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 15:38
    
A custom sign function is faster than Math.Sign. –  s_hewitt Jul 6 '10 at 16:57

Test Results (Dual core, x86):

''''''''''''''''''''' DEBUG MODE '''
= 1 =
Division took    00:00:06.2482408 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:05.0293383 ms <<<
BitTestSign took 00:00:05.2092181 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:05.2512802 ms

= 2 =
Division took    00:00:06.2477787 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:05.0330921 ms <<<
BitTestSign took 00:00:05.2114098 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:05.2556966 ms

= 3 =
Division took    00:00:06.2506690 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:05.0388615 ms <<<
BitTestSign took 00:00:05.2306954 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:05.2512391 ms


''''''''''''''''''' RELEASE MODE '''
= 1 =
Division took    00:00:01.0974078 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:00.3195232 ms
BitTestSign took 00:00:00.6392142 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:00.3194230 ms <<<

= 2 =
Division took    00:00:01.1007138 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:00.3197784 ms <<<
BitTestSign took 00:00:00.6395294 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:00.3202774 ms

= 3 =
Division took    00:00:01.0977087 ms
BuiltInSign took 00:00:00.3194622 ms <<<
BitTestSign took 00:00:00.6394220 ms
CustomSign took  00:00:00.3201607 ms

Code:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        MyEnum myEnum = MyEnum.None;

        const int max = 100000000;

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = -max; i < max; i++)
        {
            myEnum = Division(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Division took {0} ms", sw.Elapsed);
        sw.Reset();

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = -max; i < max; i++)
        {
            myEnum = BuiltInSign(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("BuiltInSign took {0} ms", sw.Elapsed);
        sw.Reset();

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = -max; i < max; i++)
        {
            myEnum = BitTestSign(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("BitTestSign took {0} ms", sw.Elapsed);
        sw.Reset();

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = -max; i < max; i++)
        {
            myEnum = CustomSign(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("CustomSign took {0} ms", sw.Elapsed);
    }

    private MyEnum Division(int value)
    {
        return value == 0 ? 0 : (MyEnum)(value / Math.Abs(value));
    }

    private MyEnum BuiltInSign(int value)
    {
        return (MyEnum)Math.Sign(value);
    }

    private MyEnum CustomSign(int value)
    {
        if (value < 0)
            return MyEnum.Neg;

        if (value > 0)
            return MyEnum.Pos;

        return MyEnum.None;
    }

    MyEnum BitTestSign(int value)
    {
        // Shifts the variable over 31 places, 
        // if the MSB is 1, the statement is true
        if ((value >> 31) == 1)
        {
            return MyEnum.Neg;
        }
        else
        {
            if (value == 0)
            {
                return MyEnum.None;
            }
            else
            {
                return MyEnum.Pos;
            }
        }
    }

    private enum MyEnum
    {
        Pos = 1,
        None = 0,
        Neg = -1
    }
}
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In the CustomSign, why do you return (MyEnum)(-1) instead of return MyEnum.Pos? Why is MyEnum.Pos a negative number, and the opposite from your original question? –  GvS Jul 6 '10 at 15:50
    
Shouldn't your test set also have negative numbers? Now, you do not measure the perf for negatives, it should be different. –  GvS Jul 6 '10 at 15:56
    
updated......... –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 16:10
1  
On my PC, if I run from -max to max the CustomSign is the fastest. –  GvS Jul 6 '10 at 16:13
2  
@serhio - are you running your tests in Debug mode instead of Release? I get results like yours in Debug mode. You should try running them in Release mode. –  s_hewitt Jul 6 '10 at 17:18

.NET internally stores ints as two's complement. So, if you want to try something else, check and see if the most significant bit is set. This may or may not be faster, but it should fit into your testing framework easily.

Pseudocode:

if(num == 0)
  return 0;

if(num has msb set)
  return -1;

return 1;
share|improve this answer
    
this method is not optimal, see the test results. –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 15:56
1  
This method is faster than Math.Sign on my machine. –  s_hewitt Jul 6 '10 at 16:59
    
@s_hewitt: But on mine, is slower, see result test... –  serhio Jul 7 '10 at 12:21

If I understand that correctly, you want to return -1 for negative values, 0 for zero values and 1 for positive values.

I'd go with:

public static MyEnum GetSign(int value)
{
    return value == 0 ? 0 : (MyEnum)(value / Math.Abs(value));
}

Or did I get something wrong?

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first of all, CompareTo return integer values, secondly, I need the most performant way. –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:14
5  
we are in the 21st century. afaik integer divisions are no slower than any other operations on modern cpus. –  Turing Complete Jul 6 '10 at 14:15
1  
My guess is you would call this with GetSign(a.compareTo(b)); –  corsiKa Jul 6 '10 at 14:16
    
There is an input value for which this will throw. –  AakashM Jul 6 '10 at 14:19
    
@Turing Complete: How do you imagine Division and Comparation be performed at the same number of ticks, "on modern CPUs"? –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 15:12

You could check the most significant bit of the variable (in two's complement, if the most significant bit is 1, you have a negative number). If your most significant bit is 0, check if the value is 0. Return a value accordingly.

int Sign(int value){
    if (value >> 31) { //Shifts the variable over 31 places, if the MSB is 1, the statement is true
         return -1;
    } else {
        if (value == 0){
            return 0;
        } else {
            return 1;
        }
    }  }  

(edited for example)

share|improve this answer
    
a code example? –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:25
    
@serhio: This is your homework, not ours. –  GvS Jul 6 '10 at 14:30
    
@GvS: thinking like this I should search the answer in books, and not asking in forum. Now if I don't know how to transform a negative to -1, do you think I am able to check the most significant bit in a integer? :) –  serhio Jul 6 '10 at 14:36
    
Your code doesn't compile. –  Joren Jul 6 '10 at 14:53
2  
@Jan: I was thinking more of if (value >> 31 == 1) to make it valid C# (a more likely .NET language) but sure, whatever. :) –  Joren Jul 6 '10 at 15:33

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