Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm attempting to modify a MIPS simulator to display the contents of its registers during run time. My question refers to the way in which I plan to do this. So...

I have a file, file1.cpp and file2.cpp. There is a local public variable in file1.cpp called

typedef long ValueGPR;
ValueGPR reg[33];

that I want to access in file2.cpp. Each of these files have a header file. File2.cpp contains a function which iteratively tracks the execution of a program instruction by instruction making this the perfect place to insert a printf("REG[%d]:%d\n",i,reg[i]); statement or something like that but reg is a local variable in file1.cpp. How do I stitch together something that will allow me to access this reg variable?

This is what both files actually look like (after thinking about this a bit more): "File1.h"

typedef long ValueGPR;
...
class ThreadContext {
    ...
    public:
        ValueGPR reg[33];
        ...
    ...
}
...

"File2.cpp"

...
#include ".../ThreadContext.h"
...
long ExecutionFlow::exeInst(void) {
    ...
    //ADD PRINTF OF reg[1] - reg[32] HERE
    ...
}
...
share|improve this question
    
Woops, I screwed up my description... So, reg is used in file1.cpp but it is defined in the following way in file1.h: typedef long ValueGPR; public: ValueGPR reg[33]; –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 15:55
    
So, if this is the case can I just replace public: ValueGPR reg[33]; with extern ValueGPR reg[33];? –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 15:57
    
@Dan: If reg is a member of a class (which it seems to be judging from your comments), then changing it into a global would be a bad idea - you'll get incorrect behaviour if you have more than one instance of the class. Instead, you should find a way to pass either reg, or the object that contains it, by reference to the function in file2.cpp that wants access to it. –  Mike Seymour Jul 6 '10 at 16:22
    
You're correct, reg is part of a class. Is it possible to define a global pointer within the object containing reg? How would one go about doing this and then access it within file2.cpp? –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 16:42
    
Please post the declaration of the classes. I'm getting confused. –  Thomas Matthews Jul 6 '10 at 17:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Cogwheel's answer is correct, but your comment indicates some possibility of confusion, so perhaps it's better to clarify a bit:

file1.h:

#ifndef FILE1_H_INCLUDED
#define FILE1_H_INCLUDED

typedef long ValueGPR;
extern ValueGPR reg[];
#define NUM_REGS 33

#endif

file1.c:

#include "file1.h"

ValueGPR reg[NUM_REGS];

file2.c:

#include "file1.h"

/* ... */
for (i=0; i<NUM_REGS; i++)
    show(reg[i]);

Edit: Given the additional point that reg is really a member of a class, the code above clearly won't work, though the general idea remains the same. For a class member, you'd need to deal with the class as a whole, not just the reg itself. Taking a wild stab at what things might look like, you could have something like:

file1.h:

// include guard here

class CPU_state { 
public:
    typedef long ValueGPR;
    static const int num_regs = 33;
    ValueGPR reg[num_regs];

    //or, preferably:

    // std::vector<ValueGPR> regs;
    // CPU_state() : regs(num_regs) {}
    // ...
};

extern CPU_state cpu;

file1.cpp:

#include "file1.h"
CPU_state cpu;

file2.cpp:

#include "file1.h"

for (int i=0; i<cpu.num_regs; i++)
    show(cpu.reg[i]);

If you might create more than one CPU at a time, then you'll probably need to pass a pointer or reference to a CPU_state (or whatever you call it) rather than relying on a global instance like this code uses.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried this with error. I think is has to do with the fact that reg is contained within a class inside of file1.h I forgot to mention this important detail... –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 16:48
    
So, the file1.h file already had a "typedef CPU_state cpu" line, but when I append "extern" to this line I am told that there are multiple storage classes in this declaration. Any ideas? –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 17:43
    
@Dan: you probably don't want it to be a typedef, just extern CPU_state cpu;. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 6 '10 at 17:50
    
It turns out that there was already an oject defined within file2.cpp which allowed me to access the reg variable I was after. –  Dan Snyder Jul 6 '10 at 18:14

I would move the typedef into file1.h along with the following declaration:

extern ValueGPR reg[];

Leave the ValueGPR reg[33]; in file1.cpp.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.