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How can I do this elegantly with C# and .Net 3.5/4?

For example a number can be between 1 and 100.

Edit: I know a simple if would suffice; but the keyword to this question is elegance. It's for my toy project not for production.

Edit 2: This questions wasn't about speed but about code beauty. Stop talking about efficiency and such; remember you're preaching to the choir.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kevin Panko, Daniel Kelley, tcooc, Serge Ballesta, hopper Jul 30 at 16:28

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

14  
Re: Your "edit" - simple is elegant. I personally find the if statement more elegant than any non-standard means of doing this check... –  Reed Copsey Jul 6 '10 at 17:37
3  
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein –  corsiKa Jul 6 '10 at 17:40
1  
@Sergio: I don't feel I am being pedantic. I feel that people often abuse extension methods and other tools in the language in order to replace things that are already simple. There are hundreds of ways to compare two int values, but using anything but the more obvious is a poor choice, IMO. –  Reed Copsey Jul 6 '10 at 17:45
1  
@Sergio: I guess, then, I don't see the point of the question ;) –  Reed Copsey Jul 6 '10 at 17:52
4  
@Sergio: if if ain't "baroque" don't fix it. –  StriplingWarrior Jul 6 '10 at 19:03

16 Answers 16

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There are a lot of options:

int x = 30;
if (Enumerable.Range(1,100).Contains(x))
    //true

if (x >= 1 && x <= 100)
    //true

Also, check out this SO post for regex options.

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52  
Enumerable.Range has to generate the enumerable of integers first, and then loop over each item to find it. That's a terrible idea and performance compared to checking a value is drastically different. I think we should adopt a moto, just because LINQ Extensions are cool, doesn't mean they should be used for everything. –  Matthew Abbott Jul 6 '10 at 17:45
1  
@Matthew: stackoverflow.com/questions/777400/… –  Adam Robinson Jul 6 '10 at 17:47
4  
I agree this is a terrible idea performance-wise, but the OP wants something more fancy than an if statement. This certainly accomplishes that... ;) –  Tim Coker Jul 6 '10 at 17:49
5  
@Matthew: Elegant not efficient! –  Dustin Laine Jul 6 '10 at 17:50
1  
The point of this question wasn't to debate what way is faster during execution. It was what code looks nicer and still gets the job done (again: I don't care about performance); this one wins by far. Easy to read and simple to use. –  Sergio Tapia Jul 6 '10 at 19:15

You mean?

if(number > 1 && number < 100)

or

bool TestRange (int numberToCheck, int bottom, int top)
{
  return (numberToCheck > bottom && numberToCheck < top);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's all you need, and is elegant enough... –  Matthew Abbott Jul 6 '10 at 17:33
1  
You don't need "is" in there... This won't compile. (Otherwise, I agree 100%) –  Reed Copsey Jul 6 '10 at 17:34
4  
You stole my algorithm :-) –  Ben Hoffstein Jul 6 '10 at 17:35
    
Thanks Reed. I feel so stupid for not seeing that. –  Kevin Jul 6 '10 at 17:36
1  
@Ben, just wait until I try and patent it too :) –  Kevin Jul 6 '10 at 17:38

As others said, use a simple if.

You should think about the ordering.

e.g

1 <= x && x <= 100

is easier to read than

x => 1 && x <= 100
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6  
"Easier" is in the eye of the beholder. I personally prefer to have the variable in question on the left and the constant or variable not in question on the right. –  Adam Robinson Jul 6 '10 at 18:25
1  
In Perl 6, you would write 1 <= x <= 100. –  Jordão Jul 6 '10 at 18:46
    
@Adam: Steve McConnell agrees with EsbenP that "number line" order is clearest (in Code Complete). Personally I agree with you. I suspect that's because I've been using that form for many years now. –  MarkJ Jul 6 '10 at 19:18
    
I up-voted Kevin's answer, but then I saw this. Great answer. –  CaptainCasey Jul 7 '10 at 1:34

Just to add to the noise here, you could create an extension method:

public static bool IsWithin(this int value, int minimum, int maximum)
{
    return value >= minimum && value <= maximum;
}

Which would let you do something like...

int val = 15;

bool foo = val.IsWithin(5,20);

That being said, this seems like a silly thing to do when the check itself is only one line.

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1  
@Ben: I went on the subject, which says "within a range" (which I don't think is ambiguous in that regard), but you're right in that the question body says "between 1 and 100" (which is, of course, ambiguous). –  Adam Robinson Jul 6 '10 at 17:44

With a bit of extension method abuse, we can get the following "elegant" solution:

using System;

namespace Elegant {
    public class Range {
        public int Lower { get; set; }
        public int Upper { get; set; }
    }

    public static class Ext {
        public static Range To(this int lower, int upper) {
            return new Range { Lower = lower, Upper = upper };
        }

        public static bool In(this int n, Range r) {
            return n >= r.Lower && n <= r.Upper;
        }
    }

    class Program {
        static void Main() {
            int x = 55;
            if (x.In(1.To(100)))
                Console.WriteLine("it's in range! elegantly!");
        }
    }
}
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if (value > 1 && value < 100)
{
    // do work
}
else
{
    // handle outside of range logic
}
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Using an && expression to join two comparisons is simply the most elegant way to do this. If you try using fancy extension methods and such, you run into the question of whether to include the upper bound, the lower bound, or both. Once you start adding additional variables or changing the extension names to indicate what is included, your code becomes longer and harder to read (for the vast majority of programmers). Furthermore, tools like Resharper will warn you if your comparison doesn't make sense (number > 100 && number < 1), which they won't do if you use a method ('i.IsBetween(100, 1)').

The only other comment I'd make is that if you're checking inputs with the intention to throw an exception, you should consider using code contracts:

Contract.Requires(number > 1 && number < 100)

This is more elegant than if(...) throw new Exception(...), and you could even get compile-time warnings if someone tries to call your method without ensuring that the number is in bounds first.

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2  
FYI, the contracts static analyzer is happier when the lower bound and upper bound constraints are split into separate Requires statements. –  Dan Bryant Jul 6 '10 at 20:12
    
Thanks Dan Bryant, that is precisely what I was here looking for. Cannot find much material on suggestions on style of conditions for the Requires and other related Code Contract methods. –  jpierson Sep 30 '13 at 1:11

If this is incidental, a simple if is all you need. If this happens in many places, you might want to consider these two:

  • PostSharp. Decorate methods with attributes that 'inject' code into the method after compilation. I don't know for sure, but I can imagine it can be used for this.

Something like:

[Between("parameter", 0, 100)]
public void Foo(int parameter)
{
}
  • Code contracts. Has the advantage that the constraints can be checked at compile time, by static verification of your code and the places that use your code.
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+1 for code contracts; it's specific to validating a parameter, but it's a frequent use case and static verification has the potential to be extremely useful. –  Dan Bryant Jul 6 '10 at 18:32

This is a real simple one. Doesnt have to be more elagant than an if statement. dont try to get too fancy. Never sacrifice simplicity for elegance.

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Can a non-simple solution be elegant? It might be very intelligent and sophisticated, but elegant? –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Sep 20 '13 at 16:59

You can reduce the number of comparisons from two to one by using some math. The idea is that one of the two factors becomes negative if the number lies outside of the range and zero if the number is equal to one of the bounds:

If the bounds are inclusive:

(x - 1) * (100 - x) >= 0

or

(x - min) * (max - x) >= 0

If the bounds are exclusive:

(x - 1) * (100 - x) > 0

or

(x - min) * (max - x) > 0
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In C, if time efficiency is crucial and integer overflows will wrap, one could do if ((unsigned)(value-min) <= (max-min)) .... If 'max' and 'min' are independent variables, the extra subtraction for (max-min) will waste time, but if that expression can be precomputed at compile time, or if it can be computed once at run-time to test many numbers against the same range, the above expression may be computed efficiently even in the case where the value is within range (if a large fraction of values will be below the valid range, it may be faster to use if ((value >= min) && (value <= max)) ... because it will exit early if value is less than min).

Before using an implementation like that, though, benchmark one one's target machine. On some processors, the two-part expression may be faster in all cases since the two comparisons may be done independently whereas in the subtract-and-compare method the subtraction has to complete before the compare can execute.

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How about something like this?

if (theNumber.isBetween(low, high, IntEx.Bounds.INCLUSIVE_INCLUSIVE))
{
}

with the extension method as follows (tested):

public static class IntEx
{
    public enum Bounds 
    {
        INCLUSIVE_INCLUSIVE, 
        INCLUSIVE_EXCLUSIVE, 
        EXCLUSIVE_INCLUSIVE, 
        EXCLUSIVE_EXCLUSIVE
    }

    public static bool isBetween(this int theNumber, int low, int high, Bounds boundDef)
    {
        bool result;
        switch (boundDef)
        {
            case Bounds.INCLUSIVE_INCLUSIVE:
                result = ((low <= theNumber) && (theNumber <= high));
                break;
            case Bounds.INCLUSIVE_EXCLUSIVE:
                result = ((low <= theNumber) && (theNumber < high));
                break;
            case Bounds.EXCLUSIVE_INCLUSIVE:
                result = ((low < theNumber) && (theNumber <= high));
                break;
            case Bounds.EXCLUSIVE_EXCLUSIVE:
                result = ((low < theNumber) && (theNumber < high));
                break;
            default:
                throw new System.ArgumentException("Invalid boundary definition argument");
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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A new twist on an old favorite:

public bool IsWithinRange(int number, int topOfRange, int bottomOfRange, bool includeBoundaries) {
    if (includeBoundaries)
        return number <= topOfRange && number >= bottomOfRange;
    return number < topOfRange && number > bottomOfRange;
}
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There are actually four cases, inclusive/inclusive, inclusive/exclusive, exclusive/inclusive and exclusive/exclusive. –  William T. Mallard Mar 28 at 16:44

If you want to write more code than a simple if, maybe you can: Create a Extension Method called IsBetween

public static class NumberExtensionMethods
{
    public static bool IsBetween(this long value, long Min, long Max)
    {
        if (value >= Min && value <= Max) return true;
        else return false;
    }
}

...

// Checks if this number is between 1 and 100.
long MyNumber = 99;
MessageBox.Show(MyNumber.IsBetween(1, 100).ToString());
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I would do a Range object, something like this :

public class Range<T> where T : IComparable
{
    public T InferiorBoundary{get;private set;}
    public T SuperiorBoundary{get;private set;}

    public Range(T inferiorBoundary, T superiorBoundary)
    {
        InferiorBoundary = inferiorBoundary;
        SuperiorBoundary = superiorBoundary;
    }

    public bool IsWithinBoundaries(T value){
        return InferiorBoundary.CompareTo(value) > 0 && SuperiorBoundary.CompareTo(value) < 0;
    }
}

Then you use it this way :

Range<int> myRange = new Range<int>(1,999);
bool isWithinRange = myRange.IsWithinBoundaries(3);

That way you can re-use it for another type.

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Your Range object needs to use the CompareTo method to compare items, not the < operator. –  Servy Sep 20 '13 at 16:06
    
You're right, though if implementing IComparable you should also override operators (at least that's what my VS code analysis is saying), meaning < would work. Although I might be wrong, I don't have much experience and this is my first answer on SO –  TopinFrassi Sep 20 '13 at 17:27
    
No, your compiler won't say that this works. This won't compile. It is entirely reasonable for an object to implement IComparable and not overload the < operator. –  Servy Sep 20 '13 at 17:28
    
I edited, sorry about the mistake indeed it doesn't compile –  TopinFrassi Sep 20 '13 at 17:34

I'd go with the more simple version:

if(Enumerable.Range(1,100).Contains(intInQuestion)) { ...DoStuff; }
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I had to change my first answer, because it contained the wrong answer to the question, but with this method you can use the static Enumerable.Range(x,y) to check for matches in an elegant way. –  cseder Nov 8 '13 at 8:45

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