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Edit: this puzzle is also known as "Einstein's Riddle"

The Who owns the Zebra is an example of a classic set of puzzles and I bet that most people on Stack Overflow can solve it with pen and paper. But what would a programmatic solution look like?

Based on the clues listed below...

  • There are five houses.
  • Each house has its own unique color.
  • All house owners are of different nationalities.
  • They all have different pets.
  • They all drink different drinks.
  • They all smoke different cigarettes.
  • The English man lives in the red house.
  • The Swede has a dog.
  • The Dane drinks tea.
  • The green house is on the left side of the white house.
  • They drink coffee in the green house.
  • The man who smokes Pall Mall has birds.
  • In the yellow house they smoke Dunhill.
  • In the middle house they drink milk.
  • The Norwegian lives in the first house.
  • The man who smokes Blend lives in the house next to the house with cats.
  • In the house next to the house where they have a horse, they smoke Dunhill.
  • The man who smokes Blue Master drinks beer.
  • The German smokes Prince.
  • The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.
  • They drink water in the house next to the house where they smoke Blend.

...who owns the Zebra?

share|improve this question
27  
Zebras were never mentioned in the list of information (clues) so the spec is under specified. As a contractor I am then free to ignore the existence of any Zebras in the solution, so my answer is simply that no one owns the Zebra, because there are no Zebras. :D –  Peter M Nov 25 '08 at 21:21
7  
@Peter M: The answer was 42. –  Mostlyharmless Nov 25 '08 at 21:24
    
Retagged, took out tags that weren't used anywhere else; changed 'puzzles' to more general 'puzzle'. –  George Stocker Nov 25 '08 at 21:26
    
Thanks for improving the tags! –  divideandconquer.se Nov 26 '08 at 5:52
1  
@Peter M: Yes, the fact that there is a Zebra is also also a clue, but it is not listed as such. –  divideandconquer.se Nov 26 '08 at 5:55

9 Answers 9

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Here's a solution in Python based on constraint-programming:

from constraint import AllDifferentConstraint, InSetConstraint, Problem

# variables
colors        = "blue red green white yellow".split()
nationalities = "Norwegian German Dane Swede English".split()
pets          = "birds dog cats horse zebra".split()
drinks        = "tea coffee milk beer water".split()
cigarettes    = "Blend, Prince, Blue Master, Dunhill, Pall Mall".split(", ")

# There are five houses.
minn, maxn = 1, 5
problem = Problem()
# value of a variable is the number of a house with corresponding property
variables = colors + nationalities + pets + drinks + cigarettes
problem.addVariables(variables, range(minn, maxn+1))

# Each house has its own unique color.
# All house owners are of different nationalities.
# They all have different pets.
# They all drink different drinks.
# They all smoke different cigarettes.
for vars_ in (colors, nationalities, pets, drinks, cigarettes):
    problem.addConstraint(AllDifferentConstraint(), vars_)

# In the middle house they drink milk.
#NOTE: interpret "middle" in a numerical sense (not geometrical)
problem.addConstraint(InSetConstraint([(minn + maxn) // 2]), ["milk"])
# The Norwegian lives in the first house.
#NOTE: interpret "the first" as a house number
problem.addConstraint(InSetConstraint([minn]), ["Norwegian"])
# The green house is on the left side of the white house.
#XXX: what is "the left side"? (linear, circular, two sides, 2D house arrangment)
#NOTE: interpret it as 'green house number' + 1 == 'white house number'
problem.addConstraint(lambda a,b: a+1 == b, ["green", "white"])

def add_constraints(constraint, statements, variables=variables, problem=problem):
    for stmt in (line for line in statements if line.strip()):
        problem.addConstraint(constraint, [v for v in variables if v in stmt])

and_statements = """
They drink coffee in the green house.
The man who smokes Pall Mall has birds.
The English man lives in the red house.
The Dane drinks tea.
In the yellow house they smoke Dunhill.
The man who smokes Blue Master drinks beer.
The German smokes Prince.
The Swede has a dog.
""".split("\n")
add_constraints(lambda a,b: a == b, and_statements)

nextto_statements = """
The man who smokes Blend lives in the house next to the house with cats.
In the house next to the house where they have a horse, they smoke Dunhill.
The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.
They drink water in the house next to the house where they smoke Blend.
""".split("\n")
#XXX: what is "next to"? (linear, circular, two sides, 2D house arrangment)
add_constraints(lambda a,b: abs(a - b) == 1, nextto_statements)

def solve(variables=variables, problem=problem):
    from itertools  import groupby
    from operator   import itemgetter

    # find & print solutions
    for solution in problem.getSolutionIter():
        for key, group in groupby(sorted(solution.iteritems(), key=itemgetter(1)), key=itemgetter(1)):
            print key, 
            for v in sorted(dict(group).keys(), key=variables.index):
                print v.ljust(9),
            print

if __name__ == '__main__':
    solve()

Output:

1 yellow    Norwegian cats      water     Dunhill  
2 blue      Dane      horse     tea       Blend    
3 red       English   birds     milk      Pall Mall
4 green     German    zebra     coffee    Prince   
5 white     Swede     dog       beer      Blue Master

It takes 0.6 seconds (CPU 1.5GHz) to find the solution.
The answer is "German owns zebra."


To install the constraint module:

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2  
I wouldn't call that incorrect. The only constraint it violates is that the green house isn't left of the white house. But that's because of the way you defined that constraint and can easily be fixed. The link in the question even allows your solution given the murky definition of "left of." –  mercator Nov 26 '08 at 21:09
4  
@LFSR Consulting: '//' is always an integer division: '3//2 == 1'. '/' could be float division '3/2 == 1.5' (in Python 3.0 or in presence of 'from future import division') or could be an integer division (like in C) '3/2 == 1' on old Python version without 'from future import division'. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 27 '08 at 19:41
1  
@J.F. Sebastian - Thanks for clearing that up. –  Gavin Miller Nov 27 '08 at 23:48
4  
Fantastic answer - and a great advertisement for both Python and the constraint module. –  Chris Dec 8 '08 at 18:39
1  
This is the first constraint program I looked at. As many pointed out your python implementation is impressive. It is really cute how you avoided hand codifying the constraints with the use of add_constraints(), and_statements, and nextto_statements. –  ragu.pattabi May 18 '10 at 14:13

In Prolog, we can instantiate the domain just by selecting elements from it :) (making mutually-exclusive choices, for efficiency). Using SWI-Prolog,

select([A|As],S):- select(A,S,S1),select(As,S1).
select([],_). 

left_of(A,B,C):- append(_,[A,B|_],C).  
next_to(A,B,C):- left_of(A,B,C) ; left_of(B,A,C).

zebra(Owns, HS):-     %// house: color,nation,pet,drink,smokes
  HS   = [ h(_,norwegian,_,_,_),    h(blue,_,_,_,_),   h(_,_,_,milk,_), _, _], 
  select([ h(red,brit,_,_,_),       h(_,swede,dog,_,_), 
           h(_,dane,_,tea,_),       h(_,german,_,_,prince)], HS),
  select([ h(_,_,birds,_,pallmall), h(yellow,_,_,_,dunhill),
           h(_,_,_,beer,bluemaster)],                        HS), 
  left_of( h(green,_,_,coffee,_),   h(white,_,_,_,_),        HS),
  next_to( h(_,_,_,_,dunhill),      h(_,_,horse,_,_),        HS),
  next_to( h(_,_,_,_,blend),        h(_,_,cats, _,_),        HS),
  next_to( h(_,_,_,_,blend),        h(_,_,_,water,_),        HS),
  member(  h(_,Owns,zebra,_,_),                              HS).

Runs quite instantly:

?- time( (zebra(Who,HS), writeln(Who), nl, maplist(writeln,HS), nl, false 
          ; writeln('no more solutions!') )).
german

h( yellow, norwegian, cats,   water,  dunhill   )
h( blue,   dane,      horse,  tea,    blend     )
h( red,    brit,      birds,  milk,   pallmall  )
h( green,  german,    zebra,  coffee, prince    )     %// formatted by hand
h( white,  swede,     dog,    beer,   bluemaster)

no more solutions!
%// 1,706 inferences, 0.000 CPU in 0.070 seconds (0% CPU, Infinite Lips)
true.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Somehow I missed this up to now... –  false Nov 12 '13 at 20:23
    
@false thanks! :) amazing how adding some whitespace brightens up the code, isn't it. :) –  Will Ness Nov 12 '13 at 20:38

One poster already mentioned that Prolog is a potential solution. This is true, and it's the solution I would use. In more general terms, this is a perfect problem for an automated inference system. Prolog is a logic programming language (and associated interpreter) that form such a system. It basically allows concluding of facts from statements made using First Order Logic. FOL is basically a more advanced form of propositional logic. If you decide you don't want to use Prolog, you could use a similar system of your own creation using a technique such as modus ponens to perform the draw the conclusions.

You will, of course, need to add some rules about zebras, since it isn't mentioned anywhere... I believe the intent is that you can figure out the other 4 pets and thus deduce the last one is the zebra? You'll want to add rules that state a zebra is one of the pets, and each house can only have one pet. Getting this kind of "common sense" knowledge into an inference system is the major hurdle to using the technique as a true AI. There are some research projects, such as Cyc, which are attempting to give such common knowledge through brute force. They've met with an interesting amount of success.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point about the "common sense" rules. I remember getting very tied up with this years ago when interpreting the phrase "the house next to the house" - does that imply there's only one? It's not obvious. –  Chris Nov 25 '08 at 21:59
    
Dude cyc has been in dev for decades without any type of revolutionary method. Kinda sad, would be neat to see the brute force approach win out over associative models. –  Josh Nov 26 '08 at 0:09
    
We used CLIPS at uni to deduce this kind of information in our AI course. –  Josh Smeaton Jan 22 '09 at 11:42

Here's how I'd go about it. First I'd generate all the ordered n-tuples

(housenumber, color, nationality, pet, drink, smoke)

5^6 of those, 15625, easily manageable. Then I'd filter out the simple boolean conditions. there's ten of them, and each of those you'd expect to filter out 8/25 of the conditions (1/25 of the conditions contain a Swede with a dog, 16/25 contain a non-Swede with a non-dog). Of course they're not independent but after filtering those out there shouldn't be many left.

After that, you've got a nice graph problem. Create a graph with each node representing one of the remaining n-tuples. Add edges to the graph if the two ends contain duplicates in some n-tuple position or violate any 'positional' constraints (there's five of those). From there you're almost home, search the graph for an independent set of five nodes (with none of the nodes connected by edges). If there's not too many, you could possibly just exhaustively generate all the 5-tuples of n-tuples and just filter them again.

This could be a good candidate for code golf. Someone can probably solve it in one line with something like haskell :)

afterthought: The initial filter pass can also eliminate information from the positional constraints. Not much (1/25), but still significant.

share|improve this answer
    
For code golf, a solution could technically just print out the answer, making it equivalent to a "Hello world" code golf. You'd have to generalize the problem to get an interesting code golf, and this doesn't generalize trivially. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 26 '08 at 0:02
    
Point taken :) My haskell is verbose but my score was out of the park anyway :) –  Chris Nov 26 '08 at 0:44
1  
I think your 5^6 assessment of possible solutions is off. I believe the number of possible combinations of 'i' items within 'm' categories should be (i!)^(m-1). For example, the five options for color could be arranged 5! ways. Providing the house numbers category stays in the same order, the other 5 categories could each be arranged that way as well, meaning the possible combinations are (5!)^5 or 24,883,200,000; quite a bit higher than 15,625, and making a brute-force attack much harder to tackle. –  MidnightLightning Aug 6 '09 at 16:55
    
15,625 is accurate based on his solution strategy. If you wanted to assign every possible state for all variables, it would be much larger, but he is choosing to build only partial states, chip away at them, then use another technique to put together the final answer. –  NickLarsen Apr 1 '10 at 18:47

SWI-Prolog compatible:

% NOTE - This may or may not be more efficent. A bit verbose, though.
left_side(L, R, [L, R, _, _, _]).
left_side(L, R, [_, L, R, _, _]).
left_side(L, R, [_, _, L, R, _]).
left_side(L, R, [_, _, _, L, R]).

next_to(X, Y, Street) :- left_side(X, Y, Street).
next_to(X, Y, Street) :- left_side(Y, X, Street).

m(X, Y) :- member(X, Y).

get_zebra(Street, Who) :- 
    Street = [[C1, N1, P1, D1, S1],
              [C2, N2, P2, D2, S2],
              [C3, N3, P3, D3, S3],
              [C4, N4, P4, D4, S4],
              [C5, N5, P5, D5, S5]],
    m([red, english, _, _, _], Street),
    m([_, swede, dog, _, _], Street),
    m([_, dane, _, tea, _], Street),
    left_side([green, _, _, _, _], [white, _, _, _, _], Street),
    m([green, _, _, coffee, _], Street),
    m([_, _, birds, _, pallmall], Street),
    m([yellow, _, _, _, dunhill], Street),
    D3 = milk,
    N1 = norwegian,
    next_to([_, _, _, _, blend], [_, _, cats, _, _], Street),
    next_to([_, _, horse, _, _], [_, _, _, _, dunhill], Street),
    m([_, _, _, beer, bluemaster], Street),
    m([_, german, _, _, prince], Street),
    next_to([_, norwegian, _, _, _], [blue, _, _, _, _], Street),
    next_to([_, _, _, water, _], [_, _, _, _, blend], Street),
    m([_, Who, zebra, _, _], Street).

At the interpreter:

?- get_zebra(Street, Who).
Street = ...
Who = german
share|improve this answer

Here's a solution using NSolver: Einstein’s Riddle in C#

Here is an excerpt:

//The green house's owner drinks coffee
Post(greenHouse.Eq(coffee));
//The person who smokes Pall Mall rears birds 
Post(pallMall.Eq(birds));
//The owner of the yellow house smokes Dunhill 
Post(yellowHouse.Eq(dunhill));
share|improve this answer
5  
There's no need to use TinyURL here, is there? They all look like rickrolls to me. –  Karl Nov 26 '08 at 17:00
2  
url is expired, as well... –  rpr Apr 22 '09 at 19:54
1  
I've fixed the expired tinyurl. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 11 '10 at 21:34

This is really a constraint solving problem. You can do it with a generalized kind of constraint propagation in logic-programming like languages. We have a demo specifically for the Zebra problem in the ALE (attribute logic engine) system:

http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~gpenn/ale.html

Here's the link to the coding of a simplified Zebra puzzle:

http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~gpenn/ale/files/grammars/baby.pl

To do this efficiently is another matter.

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Another Python solution, this time using Python's PyKE (Python Knowledge Engine). Granted, it's more verbose than using Python's "constraint" module in the solution by @J.F.Sebastian, but it provides an interesting comparison for anybody looking into a raw knowledge engine for this type of problem.

clues.kfb

categories( POSITION, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 )                                   # There are five houses.
categories( HOUSE_COLOR, blue, red, green, white, yellow )              # Each house has its own unique color.
categories( NATIONALITY, Norwegian, German, Dane, Swede, English )      # All house owners are of different nationalities.
categories( PET, birds, dog, cats, horse, zebra )                       # They all have different pets.
categories( DRINK, tea, coffee, milk, beer, water )                     # They all drink different drinks.
categories( SMOKE, Blend, Prince, 'Blue Master', Dunhill, 'Pall Mall' ) # They all smoke different cigarettes.

related( NATIONALITY, English, HOUSE_COLOR, red )    # The English man lives in the red house.
related( NATIONALITY, Swede, PET, dog )              # The Swede has a dog.
related( NATIONALITY, Dane, DRINK, tea )             # The Dane drinks tea.
left_of( HOUSE_COLOR, green, HOUSE_COLOR, white )    # The green house is on the left side of the white house.
related( DRINK, coffee, HOUSE_COLOR, green )         # They drink coffee in the green house.
related( SMOKE, 'Pall Mall', PET, birds )            # The man who smokes Pall Mall has birds.
related( SMOKE, Dunhill, HOUSE_COLOR, yellow )       # In the yellow house they smoke Dunhill.
related( POSITION, 3, DRINK, milk )                  # In the middle house they drink milk.
related( NATIONALITY, Norwegian, POSITION, 1 )       # The Norwegian lives in the first house.
next_to( SMOKE, Blend, PET, cats )                   # The man who smokes Blend lives in the house next to the house with cats.
next_to( SMOKE, Dunhill, PET, horse )                # In the house next to the house where they have a horse, they smoke Dunhill.
related( SMOKE, 'Blue Master', DRINK, beer )         # The man who smokes Blue Master drinks beer.
related( NATIONALITY, German, SMOKE, Prince )        # The German smokes Prince.
next_to( NATIONALITY, Norwegian, HOUSE_COLOR, blue ) # The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.
next_to( DRINK, water, SMOKE, Blend )                # They drink water in the house next to the house where they smoke Blend.

relations.krb

#############
# Categories

# Foreach set of categories, assert each type
categories
    foreach
        clues.categories($category, $thing1, $thing2, $thing3, $thing4, $thing5)
    assert
        clues.is_category($category, $thing1)
        clues.is_category($category, $thing2)
        clues.is_category($category, $thing3)
        clues.is_category($category, $thing4)
        clues.is_category($category, $thing5)


#########################
# Inverse Reslationships

# Foreach A=1, assert 1=A
inverse_relationship_positive
    foreach
        clues.related($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
    assert
        clues.related($category2, $thing2, $category1, $thing1)

# Foreach A!1, assert 1!A
inverse_relationship_negative
    foreach
        clues.not_related($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
    assert
        clues.not_related($category2, $thing2, $category1, $thing1)

# Foreach "A beside B", assert "B beside A"
inverse_relationship_beside
    foreach
        clues.next_to($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
    assert
        clues.next_to($category2, $thing2, $category1, $thing1)


###########################
# Transitive Relationships

# Foreach A=1 and 1=a, assert A=a
transitive_positive
    foreach
        clues.related($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
        clues.related($category2, $thing2, $category3, $thing3)

        check unique($thing1, $thing2, $thing3) \
          and unique($category1, $category2, $category3)
    assert
        clues.related($category1, $thing1, $category3, $thing3)

# Foreach A=1 and 1!a, assert A!a
transitive_negative
    foreach
        clues.related($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
        clues.not_related($category2, $thing2, $category3, $thing3)

        check unique($thing1, $thing2, $thing3) \
          and unique($category1, $category2, $category3)
    assert
        clues.not_related($category1, $thing1, $category3, $thing3)


##########################
# Exclusive Relationships

# Foreach A=1, assert A!2 and A!3 and A!4 and A!5
if_one_related_then_others_unrelated
    foreach
        clues.related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thing_other)
        check unique($category, $category_other)

        clues.is_category($category_other, $thing_not_other)
        check unique($thing, $thing_other, $thing_not_other)
    assert
        clues.not_related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thing_not_other)

# Foreach A!1 and A!2 and A!3 and A!4, assert A=5
if_four_unrelated_then_other_is_related
    foreach
        clues.not_related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thingA)
        clues.not_related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thingB)
        check unique($thingA, $thingB)

        clues.not_related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thingC)
        check unique($thingA, $thingB, $thingC)

        clues.not_related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thingD)
        check unique($thingA, $thingB, $thingC, $thingD)

        # Find the fifth variation of category_other.
        clues.is_category($category_other, $thingE)
        check unique($thingA, $thingB, $thingC, $thingD, $thingE)
    assert
        clues.related($category, $thing, $category_other, $thingE)


###################
# Neighbors: Basic

# Foreach "A left of 1", assert "A beside 1"
expanded_relationship_beside_left
    foreach
        clues.left_of($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
    assert
        clues.next_to($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)

# Foreach "A beside 1", assert A!1
unrelated_to_beside
    foreach
        clues.next_to($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)
        check unique($category1, $category2)
    assert
        clues.not_related($category1, $thing1, $category2, $thing2)


###################################
# Neighbors: Spatial Relationships

# Foreach "A beside B" and "A=(at-edge)", assert "B=(near-edge)"
check_next_to_either_edge
    foreach
        clues.related(POSITION, $position_known, $category, $thing)
        check is_edge($position_known)

        clues.next_to($category, $thing, $category_other, $thing_other)

        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position_other)
        check is_beside($position_known, $position_other)
    assert
        clues.related(POSITION, $position_other, $category_other, $thing_other)

# Foreach "A beside B" and "A!(near-edge)" and "B!(near-edge)", assert "A!(at-edge)"
check_too_close_to_edge
    foreach
        clues.next_to($category, $thing, $category_other, $thing_other)

        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position_edge)
        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position_near_edge)
        check is_edge($position_edge) and is_beside($position_edge, $position_near_edge)

        clues.not_related(POSITION, $position_near_edge, $category, $thing)
        clues.not_related(POSITION, $position_near_edge, $category_other, $thing_other)
    assert
        clues.not_related(POSITION, $position_edge, $category, $thing)

# Foreach "A beside B" and "A!(one-side)", assert "A=(other-side)"
check_next_to_with_other_side_impossible
    foreach
        clues.next_to($category, $thing, $category_other, $thing_other)

        clues.related(POSITION, $position_known, $category_other, $thing_other)
        check not is_edge($position_known)

        clues.not_related($category, $thing, POSITION, $position_one_side)
        check is_beside($position_known, $position_one_side)

        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position_other_side)
        check is_beside($position_known, $position_other_side) \
          and unique($position_known, $position_one_side, $position_other_side)
    assert
        clues.related($category, $thing, POSITION, $position_other_side)

# Foreach "A left of B"...
#   ... and "C=(position1)" and "D=(position2)" and "E=(position3)"
# ~> assert "A=(other-position)" and "B=(other-position)+1"
left_of_and_only_two_slots_remaining
    foreach
        clues.left_of($category_left, $thing_left, $category_right, $thing_right)

        clues.related($category_left, $thing_left_other1, POSITION, $position1)
        clues.related($category_left, $thing_left_other2, POSITION, $position2)
        clues.related($category_left, $thing_left_other3, POSITION, $position3)
        check unique($thing_left, $thing_left_other1, $thing_left_other2, $thing_left_other3)

        clues.related($category_right, $thing_right_other1, POSITION, $position1)
        clues.related($category_right, $thing_right_other2, POSITION, $position2)
        clues.related($category_right, $thing_right_other3, POSITION, $position3)
        check unique($thing_right, $thing_right_other1, $thing_right_other2, $thing_right_other3)

        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position4)
        clues.is_category(POSITION, $position5)

        check is_left_right($position4, $position5) \
          and unique($position1, $position2, $position3, $position4, $position5)
    assert
        clues.related(POSITION, $position4, $category_left, $thing_left)
        clues.related(POSITION, $position5, $category_right, $thing_right)


#########################

fc_extras

    def unique(*args):
        return len(args) == len(set(args))

    def is_edge(pos):
        return (pos == 1) or (pos == 5)

    def is_beside(pos1, pos2):
        diff = (pos1 - pos2)
        return (diff == 1) or (diff == -1)

    def is_left_right(pos_left, pos_right):
        return (pos_right - pos_left == 1)

driver.py (actually larger, but this is the essence)

from pyke import knowledge_engine

engine = knowledge_engine.engine(__file__)
engine.activate('relations')

try:
    natl = engine.prove_1_goal('clues.related(PET, zebra, NATIONALITY, $nationality)')[0].get('nationality')
except Exception, e:
    natl = "Unknown"
print "== Who owns the zebra? %s ==" % natl

Sample output:

$ python driver.py

== Who owns the zebra? German ==

#   Color    Nationality    Pet    Drink       Smoke    
=======================================================
1   yellow   Norwegian     cats    water    Dunhill     
2   blue     Dane          horse   tea      Blend       
3   red      English       birds   milk     Pall Mall   
4   green    German        zebra   coffee   Prince      
5   white    Swede         dog     beer     Blue Master 

Calculated in 1.19 seconds.

Source: https://github.com/DreadPirateShawn/pyke-who-owns-zebra

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