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Consider this:

>>> foo = {}
>>> foo[1] = 1.0
>>> foo[2] = foo[1]
>>> foo
{1: 0.0, 2: 0.0}
>>> foo[1] += 1.0
{1: 1.0, 2: 0.0}

This is what happens. However, what I want would be that the last line reads:

 {1: 1.0, 2: 1.0}

Meaning that both refer to the same value, even when that value changes. I know that the above works the way it does because numbers are immutable in Python. Is there any way easier than creating a custom class to store the value?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is possible only with mutable objects, so you have to wrap your immutable value with some mutable object. In fact any mutable object will do, for example built-in list:

>>> n = [0]
>>> d = { 1 : n, 2 : n }
>>> d
{1: [0], 2: [0]}
>>> d[1][0] = 3
>>> d
{1: [3], 2: [3]}

but what's hard in creating your own class or object?

>>> n = type( "number", ( object, ), { "val" : 0, "__repr__" : lambda self: str(self.val) } )()
>>> d = { 1 : n, 2 : n }
>>> d
{1: 0, 2: 0}
>>> d[1].val = 9
>>> d
{1: 9, 2: 9}

Works just as fine ;)

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The easier way to have a kind of pointer in python is pack you value in a list.

>>> foo = {}
>>> foo[1] = [1.0]
>>> foo[2] = foo[1]

>>> foo
{1: [1.0], 2: [1.0]}

>>> foo[1][0]+=100 # note the [0] to write in the list

>>> foo
{1: [101.0], 2: [101.0]}

Works !

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