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I have problems understanding why when I create two or more nodes (as shown below), the function void del_end()will only delete the char name[20] and not the whole node . How do I fix this problem without memory leak?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct node
{
    char name[20];
    char profession[20];
    int age;
    node *nxt;
    node *prv;
};

node *start_ptr = NULL;

void del_end()
{
    node *temp, *temp2;
    temp = start_ptr;
    if (start_ptr == NULL)
        cout << "Can't delete: there are no nodes" << endl;
    else if (start_ptr != NULL && start_ptr->nxt == NULL)
    {start_ptr=NULL;}
    else
    {
    while (temp->nxt != NULL)
    {
        temp = temp->nxt;
    }
    temp2=temp->prv;
    delete temp;
    temp->nxt= NULL;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  Karmastan Jul 6 '10 at 18:46
    
I assume this is homework? Please add the homework tag, if this is the case. –  pmr Jul 6 '10 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code has some problems, the worst being here:

temp2=temp->prv;
delete temp2;
temp->nxt= NULL;

You're deleting the next-to-last node, leaving any pointers to it dangling, and losing the last node.

But if you post more of the real code, we can tell you more.

EDIT:
Here's a slightly cleaned-up version of del_end (and there's still plenty of room for improvement).

void del_end()
{
  if (start_ptr == NULL)
  {
    cout << "Can't delete: there are no nodes" << endl;
    return;
  }

  if (start_ptr->nxt == NULL)
  {
    delete start_ptr;
    start_ptr = NULL;
    return;
  }

  node *nextToLast = start_ptr;
  node *last = start_ptr->nxt;

  while(last->nxt != NULL)
  {
    nextToLast = last;
    last = last->nxt;
  }

  delete last;
  nextToLast->nxt = NULL;

  return;
}

Note that this does not assume that the prev links are correct, which seems prudent here.

share|improve this answer
    
my code is really long, and adding 4 spaces to every line is a lot of manual work. is there a way to just put a file on the post? –  danutenshu Jul 6 '10 at 18:55
    
@danutenshu: if there is, it's still not a good idea-- posts should be brief. Try putting in just enough code to reproduce the problem (e.g. put in a main that constructs a small list and then calls del_end). In the meantime, I'll post a modified version of del_end. –  Beta Jul 6 '10 at 19:08
    
So I realize I need a destructor, but would temp=NULL cause any memory leak? –  danutenshu Jul 6 '10 at 19:31
    
@danutenshu: 1) a destructor is handy but not strictly necessary, and 2) the memory leak is already there in your code, and temp=NULL won't fix it. –  Beta Jul 6 '10 at 19:36
    
I'm going to solve it myself, but I tried inserting your code but the problem is that it merely deletes node->name, so I'm making void destructor(node obj) which will delete the data, make pointers nxt and prv NULL. –  danutenshu Jul 6 '10 at 20:16
delete temp2;

WILL delete whole node.

share|improve this answer
    
The node is deleted, but if any memory pointed to by the node was declared on the heap, I don't think it will be deleted. Can you kindly provide an original source that explains my error? OOPS! I somehow passed over the fact that the two char arrays are declared on the stack! –  San Jacinto Jul 6 '10 at 18:49

The problem is that you appear to be trying to delete the last node, but you are in fact deleting the one right before it.

while (temp->nxt != NULL) 
{ 
    temp = temp->nxt; 
} 
temp2=temp->prv; 
delete temp2; 
temp->nxt= NULL; 

This is your issue. Change it to this:

while (temp->nxt != NULL) 
{ 
    temp = temp->nxt; 
} 
temp2=temp->prv; 
delete temp; 
temp2->nxt= NULL;

And I believe it will work as intended. This saves off the next to last node, deletes the end and then sets the next to last node's nxt pointer to null, making it the last one.

share|improve this answer

If you're concerned about memory, I highly recommend learning to work with Valgrind http://valgrind.org/. It is a great tool. Valgrind divides memory leaks into 3 categories:

  • "definitely lost" - pointer to dynamically allocated memory is lost and there is no way to recover it
  • "possibly lost" - pointer to the dynamically allocated memory is pointing to the interior of a block and may be unrelated
  • "still reachable" - pointer to the dynamically allocated memory still exists, but the memory was never freed at the end of the programs execution

Running Valgrind is also very simple. Here's a link to the User Manual http://valgrind.org/docs/manual/manual.html. Some useful flags when running valgrind:

  • --leak-check=<no|summary|yes|full>
  • --show-reachable=<no|yes>

Now, the way I would remove a node in a doubly-linked list is:

// if the node to be removed is the head node
if (nodeToRemove->prev == NULL) {
    // reassign the head node pointer
    start_ptr = nodeToRemove->next;
} else {
    // correct previous node pointer
    nodeToRemove->prev->next = nodeToRemove->next;
}

// if the node to be removed node is the tail node
if (nodeToRemove->next == NULL) {
    // reassign the tail node pointer
    end_ptr = nodeToRemove->prev;
} else {
    // correct next node pointer
    nodeToRemove->next->prev = nodeToRemove->prev;
}

// deallocate memory
delete(nodeToRemove);
nodeToRemove = NULL;

Just declare node *end_ptr = NULL; after you declare start_ptr and when you append a node to the list, make sure the end_ptr is always pointing to the end of the list... and if you're adding to the end of the list, its easy... just point the end_ptr to the node being added.

You might as well keep a tail pointer, if you always have to delete the last node. So once you have the node you want to delete, I just check if its the head/tail node, reassign the next/prev pointers, and free the memory.

Btw... I took this from my C implementation, so if the syntax is off I apologize... but the logic is there.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks a lot, I'll definitely use this. –  danutenshu Jul 6 '10 at 19:12
    
No problem. If this is a school-related assignment, I'm surprised that they don't MAKE you use Valgrind. –  Hristo Jul 6 '10 at 19:14
    
nope, self taught, haha –  danutenshu Jul 6 '10 at 19:57
    
Oh ok... good luck! –  Hristo Jul 6 '10 at 19:59

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