Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a bit of help with NSTask. Also, I am new to Cocoa / Obj-C programming, so please bear with me. I am trying to make a directory. Then, remove it. So here is what I have so far:

NSLog (@"START");

NSTask *task;
task = [[NSTask alloc] init];
[task setLaunchPath: @"/bin/mkdir"];

NSArray *arguments;
arguments = [NSArray arrayWithObjects: @"/tmp/TEMP", nil];
[task setArguments: arguments];

NSPipe *pipe;
pipe = [NSPipe pipe];
[task setStandardOutput: pipe];
[task setStandardError: pipe];

NSFileHandle *file;
file = [pipe fileHandleForReading];

NSLog (@"MKDIR");

[task launch];
[task waitUntilExit];

NSData *data;
data = [file readDataToEndOfFile];

string = [[NSString alloc] initWithData: data encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding];

NSLog (@"OUTPUT:\n%@", string);

[task release];
//EDIT: The following lines should be removed and [string release]; should be added.
[arguments release];
[pipe release];
[file release];
[data release];

My question is if the part towards the end about "release"-ing is correct? If not, can someone help me correct it? Also, if I wanted to do another NSTask of "rmdir", would I just do "task = [[NSTask alloc] init];" and so on for each variable I used or will I need to make new variables? THANKS A LOT!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, no, you aren't managing memory correctly (hint: only task is correctly handled above). Read this as it explains all.

Secondly, there is no need to use an NSTask instance to make/delete a directory. You should use NSFileManager instead; again -- the documentation explains all.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I was just using mkdir/rmdir as an example. I will be doing this for other commands, such as dd, dns-sd, asr, etc. –  hassaanm Jul 7 '10 at 17:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.