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What's the best way to validate that an IP entered by the user is valid? It comes in as a string.

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9 Answers

Don't parse it. Just ask.

import socket

try:
    socket.inet_aton(addr)
    # legal
except socket.error:
    # Not legal
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5  
Hmm, seems to accept things like "4" and "192.168" and silently pads the rest with zeros. Technically valid, I'm sure, but not quite what I expected. –  krupan Nov 25 '08 at 23:58
3  
No, does not work with all legal IP addresses: >>> socket.inet_aton("2001:660::1") Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> socket.error: illegal IP address string passed to inet_aton –  bortzmeyer Dec 1 '08 at 10:53
15  
@bortzmeyer: socket.inet_pton(socket_family, address) is what you want if you want to support ip6. You still need to specify the family. inet_aton specifically does not support anything but ip4. –  richo May 26 '10 at 5:15
4  
It looks like Richo's response solves krupan and bortzmeyer's questions. Use socket.inet_pton with socket.AF_INET or socket.AF_INET6 as family to validate ipv4 and ipv6 without incomplete addresses being accepted. –  freb Nov 23 '11 at 1:26
4  
inet_aton() isn't accepting "invalid" IPs when it accepts "4", "192.168" and "127.1", it is merely using the underlying C behaviour - see the documentation. 127.1 puts 127 in the top octet and parses the 1 as a 24-bit number that it splits across the remaining three octets. The idea is to support /16 ranges that increment IPs, so you can go 172.16.1...172.16.255 and then 172.16.256, rather than having alter your maths to go to 172.16.1.0. –  IBBoard Dec 7 '12 at 15:32
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The IPy module (a module designed for dealing with IP addresses) will throw a ValueError exception for invalid addresses.

>>> from IPy import IP
>>> IP('127.0.0.1')
IP('127.0.0.1')
>>> IP('277.0.0.1')
Traceback (most recent call last):
 ...
ValueError: '277.0.0.1': single byte must be 0 <= byte < 256
>>> IP('foobar')
Traceback (most recent call last):
 ...
ValueError: invalid literal for long() with base 10: 'foobar'

However, like Dustin's answer, it will accept things like "4" and "192.168" since, as mentioned, these are valid representations of IP addresses.

If you're using Python 3.3 or later, it now includes the ipaddress module:

>>> import ipaddress
>>> ipaddress.ip_address('127.0.0.1')
IPv4Address('127.0.0.1')
>>> ipaddress.ip_address('277.0.0.1')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python3.3/ipaddress.py", line 54, in ip_address
    address)
ValueError: '277.0.0.1' does not appear to be an IPv4 or IPv6 address
>>> ipaddress.ip_address('foobar')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python3.3/ipaddress.py", line 54, in ip_address
    address)
ValueError: 'foobar' does not appear to be an IPv4 or IPv6 address
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Excellent idea. The only solution presented until now which works with all IP addresses. >>> from IPy import IP >>> IP("2001:660::1") IP('2001:660::1') –  bortzmeyer Dec 1 '08 at 10:56
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def is_valid_ip(ip):
    """Validates IP addresses.
    """
    return is_valid_ipv4(ip) or is_valid_ipv6(ip)

IPv4:

def is_valid_ipv4(ip):
    """Validates IPv4 addresses.
    """
    pattern = re.compile(r"""
        ^
        (?:
          # Dotted variants:
          (?:
            # Decimal 1-255 (no leading 0's)
            [3-9]\d?|2(?:5[0-5]|[0-4]?\d)?|1\d{0,2}
          |
            0x0*[0-9a-f]{1,2}  # Hexadecimal 0x0 - 0xFF (possible leading 0's)
          |
            0+[1-3]?[0-7]{0,2} # Octal 0 - 0377 (possible leading 0's)
          )
          (?:                  # Repeat 0-3 times, separated by a dot
            \.
            (?:
              [3-9]\d?|2(?:5[0-5]|[0-4]?\d)?|1\d{0,2}
            |
              0x0*[0-9a-f]{1,2}
            |
              0+[1-3]?[0-7]{0,2}
            )
          ){0,3}
        |
          0x0*[0-9a-f]{1,8}    # Hexadecimal notation, 0x0 - 0xffffffff
        |
          0+[0-3]?[0-7]{0,10}  # Octal notation, 0 - 037777777777
        |
          # Decimal notation, 1-4294967295:
          429496729[0-5]|42949672[0-8]\d|4294967[01]\d\d|429496[0-6]\d{3}|
          42949[0-5]\d{4}|4294[0-8]\d{5}|429[0-3]\d{6}|42[0-8]\d{7}|
          4[01]\d{8}|[1-3]\d{0,9}|[4-9]\d{0,8}
        )
        $
    """, re.VERBOSE | re.IGNORECASE)
    return pattern.match(ip) is not None

IPv6:

def is_valid_ipv6(ip):
    """Validates IPv6 addresses.
    """
    pattern = re.compile(r"""
        ^
        \s*                         # Leading whitespace
        (?!.*::.*::)                # Only a single whildcard allowed
        (?:(?!:)|:(?=:))            # Colon iff it would be part of a wildcard
        (?:                         # Repeat 6 times:
            [0-9a-f]{0,4}           #   A group of at most four hexadecimal digits
            (?:(?<=::)|(?<!::):)    #   Colon unless preceeded by wildcard
        ){6}                        #
        (?:                         # Either
            [0-9a-f]{0,4}           #   Another group
            (?:(?<=::)|(?<!::):)    #   Colon unless preceeded by wildcard
            [0-9a-f]{0,4}           #   Last group
            (?: (?<=::)             #   Colon iff preceeded by exacly one colon
             |  (?<!:)              #
             |  (?<=:) (?<!::) :    #
             )                      # OR
         |                          #   A v4 address with NO leading zeros 
            (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]?\d)
            (?: \.
                (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]?\d)
            ){3}
        )
        \s*                         # Trailing whitespace
        $
    """, re.VERBOSE | re.IGNORECASE | re.DOTALL)
    return pattern.match(ip) is not None

The IPv6 version uses "(?:(?<=::)|(?<!::):)", which could be replaced with "(?(?<!::):)" on regex engines that support conditionals with look-arounds. (i.e. PCRE, .NET)

Edit:

  • Dropped the native variant.
  • Expanded the regex to comply with the RFC.
  • Added another regex for IPv6 addresses.

Edit2:

I found some links discussing how to parse IPv6 addresses with regex:

Edit3:

Finally managed to write a pattern that passes all tests, and that I am also happy with.

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1  
No, works only with IPv4 addresses. –  bortzmeyer Dec 1 '08 at 10:56
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import socket

def is_valid_ipv4_address(address):
    try:
        socket.inet_pton(socket.AF_INET, address)
    except AttributeError:  # no inet_pton here, sorry
        try:
            socket.inet_aton(address)
        except socket.error:
            return False
        return address.count('.') == 3
    except socket.error:  # not a valid address
        return False

    return True

def is_valid_ipv6_address(address):
    try:
        socket.inet_pton(socket.AF_INET6, address)
    except socket.error:  # not a valid address
        return False
    return True
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Why the line: "return address.count('.') == 3" ?? Is that left over from your debugging? –  quux Dec 15 '10 at 15:32
4  
@quux: no. It's a long discussion, and people don't like the fact that at least on Linux and Windows shortened addresses are considered acceptable. For example, socket.inet_aton('127.1') evaluates to '\x7f\x00\x00\x01' (i.e. exactly like '127.0.0.1' does). I've had this tiresome and lengthy discussion elsewhere on SO, can't bother to remember where, though. –  tzot Dec 15 '10 at 19:44
    
Thanks. I didn't know that! –  quux Jan 15 '11 at 12:20
    
How about on windows? –  towry Apr 6 '13 at 4:36
1  
There's no need for an assignment to addr. –  Danilo Bargen May 27 '13 at 17:40
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I think this would do it...

def validIP(address):
    parts = address.split(".")
    if len(parts) != 4:
        return False
    for item in parts:
        if not 0 <= int(item) <= 255:
            return False
    return True
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1  
You may want to catch the ValueError exception from int() in case the user types "a.b.c.d" and not integers. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 26 '08 at 0:05
2  
Wrong code, works only with IPv4 addresses. –  bortzmeyer Dec 1 '08 at 10:54
3  
Python's int() coercion is too lax here; for example, it strips spaces. –  Daira Hopwood Nov 20 '11 at 0:45
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From Python 3.4 on, the best way to check if an IPv6 or IPv4 address is correct is to use the module ipaddr proposed by PEP3144.

Example :

#!/usr/bin/env python

import ipaddr
import sys

try:
   ip = ipaddr.ip_address(sys.argv[1])
   print '%s is a correct IP%s address.' % (ip, ip.version)
except ValueError:
   print 'address/netmask is invalid: %s' % sys.argv[1]
except:
   print 'Usage : %s  ip' % sys.argv[0]
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1  
I suggest you edit your answer specifying the version(s) of Python that this module is included in the stdlib. –  tzot Jun 27 '12 at 9:02
    
@tzot someone should fork Python 2.x and all sorts of nice stuff to it from 3.x libraries and even core. IMHO. –  Prof. Falken Jan 22 '13 at 8:52
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I have to give a great deal of credit to Markus Jarderot for his post - the majority of my post is inspired from his.

I found that Markus' answer still fails some of the IPv6 examples in the Perl script referenced by his answer.

Here is my regex that passes all of the examples in that Perl script:

r"""^
     \s* # Leading whitespace
     # Zero-width lookaheads to reject too many quartets
     (?:
        # 6 quartets, ending IPv4 address; no wildcards
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){6}
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 0-5 quartets, wildcard, ending IPv4 address
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,4}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 0-4 quartets, wildcard, 0-1 quartets, ending IPv4 address
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,3}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:)))?
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 0-3 quartets, wildcard, 0-2 quartets, ending IPv4 address
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,2}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,2}
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 0-2 quartets, wildcard, 0-3 quartets, ending IPv4 address
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,1}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,3}
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 0-1 quartets, wildcard, 0-4 quartets, ending IPv4 address
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}){0,1}
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,4}
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # wildcard, 0-5 quartets, ending IPv4 address
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,5}
             (?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)
        (?:\.(?:25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){3}
      |
        # 8 quartets; no wildcards
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){7}[0-9a-f]{1,4}
      |
        # 0-7 quartets, wildcard
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,6}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
      |
        # 0-6 quartets, wildcard, 0-1 quartets
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,5}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # 0-5 quartets, wildcard, 0-2 quartets
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,4}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,1}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # 0-4 quartets, wildcard, 0-3 quartets
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,3}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,2}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # 0-3 quartets, wildcard, 0-4 quartets
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,2}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,3}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # 0-2 quartets, wildcard, 0-5 quartets
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,1}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,4}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # 0-1 quartets, wildcard, 0-6 quartets
        (?:[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,5}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
      |
        # wildcard, 0-7 quartets
        (?:::(?!:))
        (?:(?:[0-9a-f]{1,4}(?::(?!:))){0,6}[0-9a-f]{1,4})?
     )
     (?:/(?:1(?:2[0-7]|[01]\d)|\d\d?))? # With an optional CIDR routing prefix (0-128)
     \s* # Trailing whitespace
    $"""

I also put together a Python script to test all of those IPv6 examples; it's here on Pastebin because it was too large to post here.

You can run the script with test result and example arguments in the form of "[result]=[example]", so like:

python script.py Fail=::1.2.3.4: pass=::127.0.0.1 false=::: True=::1

or you can simply run all of the tests by specifying no arguments, so like:

python script.py

Anyway, I hope this helps somebody else!

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1  
+1 for effort :) –  Prof. Falken Jan 22 '13 at 8:53
    
Although I admire your effort as well, I think there's a huge design flaw in your construct: It's way too big! I would never trust a regex of this size that was not used by thousands of people for years. –  erikb85 Apr 16 at 12:05
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I only needed to parse IP v4 addresses. My solution based on Chills strategy follows:

def getIP():
valid = False
while not valid :
octets = raw_input( "Remote Machine IP Address:" ).strip().split(".")
try: valid=len( filter( lambda(item):0<=int(item)<256, octets) ) == 4
except: valid = False
return ".".join( octets )
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if the following script is hosted on a webserver, it should print out visitors Ip address. You can also put it in a database by assigning it to a variable:

'import os

 print 'Content-Type:text/html'
 print 

 print os.environ["REMOTE_ADDR"]' 
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