Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I convert a byte array into a string?

I have found these functions that do the reverse:

function string2Bin(s) {
    var b = new Array();
    var last = s.length;

    for (var i = 0; i < last; i++) {
        var d = s.charCodeAt(i);
        if (d < 128)
            b[i] = dec2Bin(d);
        else {
            var c = s.charAt(i);
            alert(c + ' is NOT an ASCII character');
            b[i] = -1;
        }
    }
    return b;
}

function dec2Bin(d) {
    var b = '';

    for (var i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
        b = (d%2) + b;
        d = Math.floor(d/2);
    }

    return b;
}

But how do I get the functions working the other way?

Thanks.

Shao

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to convert a byte array to a string, or an array of bits to a string? –  mcandre Jul 7 '10 at 14:53
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You need to parse each octet back to number, and use that value to get a character, something like this:

function bin2String(array) {
  var result = "";
  for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    result += String.fromCharCode(parseInt(array[i], 2));
  }
  return result;
}

bin2String(["01100110", "01101111", "01101111"]); // "foo"

// Using your string2Bin function to test:
bin2String(string2Bin("hello world")) === "hello world";

Edit: Yes, your current string2Bin can be written more shortly:

function string2Bin(str) {
  var result = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    result.push(str.charCodeAt(i).toString(2));
  }
  return result;
}

But by looking at the documentation you linked, I think that the setBytesParameter method expects that the blob array contains the decimal numbers, not a bit string, so you could write something like this:

function string2Bin(str) {
  var result = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    result.push(str.charCodeAt(i));
  }
  return result;
}

function bin2String(array) {
  return String.fromCharCode.apply(String, array);
}

string2Bin('foo'); // [102, 111, 111]
bin2String(string2Bin('foo')) === 'foo'; // true
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the super speedy response. Couple of questions... 1) Your bin2String function is impressive - only 5 lines of code. Can the string2bin function be changed to make use of more Javascript functions to shorten the function and sub-function? ..... –  user385579 Jul 7 '10 at 15:23
1  
2) The reason I need these conversions is because I am capturing a signature and I have to convert it to populate a BLOB field in the database. Problem is, whilst these 2 functions work, something else is going wrong. The main thing is that when I retrieve a BLOB from the database it goes into a bytes array object. However, when I am writing the BLOB to the database after running it through the original function it is not a bytes array object. This might be what's causing the problem. Any ideas? –  user385579 Jul 7 '10 at 15:24
    
dcx.sybase.com/index.html#1101en/ulmbus_en11/… This is the syntax I use to set the data. –  user385579 Jul 7 '10 at 15:25
    
@shaochan: Give a look to my edit. –  CMS Jul 8 '10 at 4:31
1  
String.fromCharCode.apply(String, array) is unsafe for very long strings in Safari. There's an issue in JavaScriptCore which means that functions can't take more than 65536 arguments, or a RangeError will be thrown. It also locks up the browser on arrays slightly smaller than that. See bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=80797 –  Matt Mar 12 '12 at 12:16
show 1 more comment

That string2Bin can be written even more succinctly, and without any loops, to boot!

function string2Bin ( str ) {
    return str.split("").map( function( val ) { 
        return val.charCodeAt( 0 ); 
    } );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Would be curious to see if added function calls slow this down. –  jocull May 24 '13 at 4:46
6  
It still has a loop, it's just hidden within map(). –  Johannes Lumpe Jun 28 '13 at 14:11
add comment

I think this would be more efficient:

function toBinString (arr) {
    var uarr = new Uint8Array(arr.map(function(x){return parseInt(x,2)}));
    var strings = [], chunksize = 0xffff;
    // There is a maximum stack size. We cannot call String.fromCharCode with as many arguments as we want
    for (var i=0; i*chunksize < uarr.length; i++){
        strings.push(String.fromCharCode.apply(null, uarr.subarray(i*chunksize, (i+1)*chunksize)));
    }
    return strings.join('');
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.