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I have a simple query and am wondering if it could be more elegantly coded. The final solution has to be ansi-compliant.

I need to fetch the latest value from a table based on date and version. A sample would explain more clearly:

declare @t table (id int, due_date smalldatetime, version int, value nvarchar(10))

insert into @t select 3, '1/1/2010', 1, 'value 1'
insert into @t select 3, '1/1/2010', 2, 'value 2'
insert into @t select 3, '3/1/2010', 1, 'value 3'
insert into @t select 3, '3/1/2010', 2, 'value 4'
insert into @t select 3, '3/1/2010', 3, 'value 5'
insert into @t select 3, '3/1/2010', 4, 'value 6'
insert into @t select 3, '4/1/2010', 1, 'value 7'
insert into @t select 3, '4/1/2010', 2, 'value 8'
insert into @t select 3, '4/1/2010', 3, 'value 9'


select value from @t t
    inner join (select due_date, version=max(version) 
                from @t where due_date = (select max(due_date) from @t) group by due_date) maxes
    on t.due_date=maxes.due_date and t.version=maxes.version

So I would expect the output to be

value 9

which it is based on the above query.

I'm not particulary happy with this solution - any better ways to accomplish this?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use:

  SELECT TOP 1 
         x.value
    FROM @t x
ORDER BY x.due_date DESC, x.version DESC

TOP is not ANSI, though. Another option would be to use ANSI analytical/rank/windowing functions:

SELECT x.value
  FROM (SELECT t.value,
               ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY t.due_date DESC, t.version DESC) AS rank
          FROM @t t) x
 WHERE x.rank = 1

But this requires a database that supports the functionality - MySQL doesn't, PostgreSQL only started in v8.4...

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, this is so simple it didn't even cross my mind... –  cjk Jul 7 '10 at 15:33
    
That was incredibly quick (the responses, that is). I have never used the ranking functions in earnest - I think it's high time I learned... Thanks for the answers. EDIT: this is SQL Server 2005 –  Sean Jul 7 '10 at 15:41
    
@Sean: I'd recommend using TOP before ROW_NUMBER for this example, or consider either of Tom H's queries. –  OMG Ponies Jul 7 '10 at 15:44
    
Hi OMG - any reason for that above comment? I have the code working and it makes sense to me. TOP (as you previously noted) is not ansi-compliant... –  Sean Jul 7 '10 at 16:10
    
@Sean: Because as fast as ROW_NUMBER is, it will have to run through the entire table to attribute the rank value before performing the outer query. The less passes over the data, the more efficient the query. –  OMG Ponies Jul 7 '10 at 16:19
SELECT
    value
FROM
    @t T1
LEFT OUTER JOIN @t T2 ON
    T2.id = T1.id AND
    (
        (T2.due_date > T1.due_date) OR
        (T2.due_date = T1.due_date AND T2.version > T1.version)
    )
WHERE
    T2.id IS NULL

or...

SELECT
    value
FROM
    @t T1
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS
    (
        SELECT
        FROM
            @t T2
        WHERE
            T2.id = T1.id AND
            (
                (T2.due_date > T1.due_date) OR
                (T2.due_date = T1.due_date AND T2.version > T1.version)
            )
    )
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