Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a base class(Base) whose constructor takes a reference as argument. In my derived class its constructor, I call the superclass-constructor and of course I need to pass a reference as argument. But I have to obtain that argument from a method of which the return type is by value...

I will give a short example:

class Base
{
public:
    Base(MyType &obj) { /* do something with the obj */}
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived(MyOtherType *otherType) :
         Base(otherType->getMyTypeObj()) // <--- Here is the error because (see *)
    {
         // * 
         // getMyTypeObj() returns a value and
         // the Base constructor wants a reference...
    }
};

class MyOtherType
{
public:
    MyType getMyTypeObj()
    {
         MyType obj;
         obj.setData( /* blah, blah, blah... Some data */);
         return obj; // Return by value to avoid the returned reference goes out of scope.
    }
};

How can I solve this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Does Base constructor modify the object, reference to which it gets? What are the constraints? I mean, what portions of the code You can modify and what portions have to stay untouched? –  Maciej Hehl Jul 7 '10 at 16:05
2  
Make the parameter a const reference. –  anon Jul 7 '10 at 16:06
    
How does the const reference help? It is still a reference to something that no longer exists. –  Michael J Jul 7 '10 at 16:31
2  
@Michael No, it isn't. If a const reference is used, it's perfectly OK to bind that reference to a temporary, such as a return value. What he can't do is store that reference in the object being constructed, but I'm not clear that is what he is doing. –  anon Jul 7 '10 at 16:43
    
@Neil - I think that the const reference will live as long as the constructor runs, but we don't know if the base constructor saves some reference for later use. –  Michael J Jul 7 '10 at 16:48
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Change the Base class to: class Base { public: Base(const MyType &obj) { /* do something with the obj */} };

Update: If you want to modify obj you cannot obviously have a const reference. In that case you can either:

1)Pass the parameter by value. That will have the overhead for the copy but avoid having to free it explicitly later.

2) Change MyOtherType::getMyTypeObj() to

MyType& MyOtherType::getMyTypeObj()
{
    MyType* obj = new MyType();
    obj->setData( /* blah, blah, blah... Some data */);
    return *obj;

}

In this case, remember to delete the object after you are done with it.

share|improve this answer
2  
This would work unless /* do something with the obj */ meant he wants to modify obj. –  5ound Jul 7 '10 at 16:27
    
of course, this is where overloading comes in handy :) –  Cogwheel Jul 7 '10 at 16:47
    
Of course. But then, if he wants to modify the object, he is probably better off making his own copy. Updated my answer. Thanks –  341008 Jul 7 '10 at 17:20
add comment

Seriously? Your question has the answer in it. Change either the type of the parameter to the Base constructor, or the type of the return value of getMyTypeObj() so that the types are compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: it seems like it's all your code, so why workaround an issue you can fix? –  rubenvb Jul 7 '10 at 17:05
add comment

The problem is caused by the GetMyTypeObj() returning a copy of 'obj', which is stack-based, so the compiler makes a temporary variable inside your constructor, the scope of which is just that Base() construction call.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems to me that there are two ways to solve this.

  1. Change the Base constructor to accept a MyType object by value instead of by reference. This will copy the temporary object and solve scope problems.

  2. Alternatively, you can make a copy of the MyType object in Derived and pass a reference to that.

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    Derived(MyOtherType *otherType) :
        Base(m_myType) ,
        m_myType(otherType->getMyTypeObj())
    {
        // ...
    }
private:
    MyType m_myType;
};

Option 1 is simpler and I would generally recommend it.
Option 2 is just in case some other constraint prevents you changing the Base constructor,

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.