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In C#, using the initialization syntax I can say:

string[] mystrings = {"one", "two", "three"};

Is it possible to use the same array initialization syntax to convert this:

string test = "This is a good sentance to split, it has at least one split word to split on.";
string[] mystrings = test.Split(new string[] { "split" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

Into something like this:

string test = "This is a good sentance to split, it has at least one split word to split on.";
string[] mystrings = test.Split({ "split" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

It seems like it should work but I can't get it to do anything.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Almost there:

string[] mystrings = test.Split(new[]{ "split" }, 
    StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
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Hey, that's something! –  Nate Zaugg Jul 7 '10 at 16:29
1  
Yeah, a string less to type :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 7 '10 at 16:30
    
This is the answer. :) –  Nathan Taylor Jul 7 '10 at 16:30
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Looks like you need a new string method:

public static class StringExtensions {
  public static string[] Split(this string self, string separator, StringSplitOptions options) {
    return self.Split(new[] { separator }, options);
  }
}

Use it like this:

string[] mystrings = test.Split("split", StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

Now, it's up to you to decide if it's worth or not to introduce it.

For multiple separators, you can fix the options parameter (or put it in front, which will feel unnatural based on the other "overloads"):

public static class StringExtensions {
  // maybe just call it Split
  public static string[] SplitAndRemoveEmptyEntries(this string self, params string[] separators) {
    return self.Split(separators, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
  }
}

And the usage:

string[] mystrings = test.SplitAndRemoveEmptyEntries("banana", "split"); 
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cleaver, although if you still wanted to have multiple split strings then you would be in the same boat. –  Nate Zaugg Jul 7 '10 at 16:39
    
Maybe not, let me try again.... –  Jordão Jul 7 '10 at 16:41
    
This is my preferred method. I almost always make an extension method similar to this, and even use optional parameters for the StringSplitOptions. –  drharris Jul 7 '10 at 16:41
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You can certainly have this syntax:

string test = "This is a good sentance to split, it has at least one split word to split on.";
string[] mystrings = test.Split(new[] { "split" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

but I am not sure if you can simplify it any further...

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You could add an extension method:

    public static String[] Split(this string myString, string mySeperator, StringSplitOptions options)
    {
        return myString.Split(new[] {mySeperator}, options);
    }

Then you can do:

    string test = "This is a good sentance to split, it has at least one split word to split on.";
    string[] mystrings = test.Split("split", StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
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