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Has anyone ever used the Bridge Pattern in a real world application? If so, how did you use it? Is it me, or is it just the Adaptor Pattern with a little dependancy injection thrown into the mix? Does it really deserve its own pattern?

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1  
I definitely feel some deja-vu when I see it, but the description is too dense, and my brain isn't complying so I'm not sure what the text is supposed to mean... –  Robert Gould Nov 26 '08 at 4:35

9 Answers 9

up vote 33 down vote accepted

A classic example of the Bridge pattern is used in the definition of shapes in an UI environment (see the Bridge pattern Wikipedia entry). The Bridge pattern is a composite of the Template and Strategy patterns.

It is a common view some aspects of the Adapter pattern in the Bridge pattern. However, to quote from this article:

At first sight, the Bridge pattern looks a lot like the Adapter pattern in that a class is used to convert one kind of interface to another. However, the intent of the Adapter pattern is to make one or more classes' interfaces look the same as that of a particular class. The Bridge pattern is designed to separate a class's interface from its implementation so you can vary or replace the implementation without changing the client code.

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The Bridge pattern is an application of the old advice, "prefer composition over inheritance". It becomes handy when you must subclass different times in ways that are orthogonal with one another. Say you must implement a hierarchy of colored shapes. You wouldn't subclass Shape with Rectangle and Circle and then subclass Rectangle with RedRectangle, BlueRectangle and GreenRectangle and the same for Circle, would you? You would prefer to say that each Shape has a Color and to implement a hierarchy of colors, and that is the Bridge Pattern. Well, I wouldn't implement a "hierarchy of colors", but you get the idea...

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8  
Yes. Well explained. –  Ankur Sep 7 '09 at 16:42
    
good explanation, thanks. –  Attilah Feb 26 '11 at 14:47
    
Very good answer over the accepted answer. –  RoboAlex May 8 '13 at 21:46
    
+1 for pratical explanation of real example. –  morde Jun 3 '13 at 20:30
    
See also Anton Shchastnyi diagram below for a graphical illustration of this explanation. –  NomadeNumerique Feb 3 at 17:51

There's a combination of Federico's and John's answers.

When:

                   ----Shape---
                  /            \
         Rectangle              Circle
        /         \            /      \
BlueRectangle  RedRectangle BlueCircle RedCircle

Refactor to:

          ----Shape---                        Color
         /            \                       /   \
Rectangle(Color)   Circle(Color)           Blue   Red
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3  
The best example, Thanks. Of course thanks to both the supporters above too. Without them, I probably wouldn't have been able to understand this either. –  Arturas M Oct 3 '12 at 22:52
4  
Why would you do inheritance for colors? –  vainolo Feb 3 '13 at 9:32
1  
@vainolo because Color is an interface and Blue, Red are concrete colors –  nikola Feb 28 at 21:46

When:

        A
     /     \
    Aa      Ab
   / \     /  \
 Aa1 Aa2  Ab1 Ab2

Refactor to:

     A         N
  /     \     / \
Aa(N) Ab(N)  1   2
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1  
I think it's very pragmatic approach to patterns: 1) describe suboptimal straight-forward design 2) refactor design/code to better factored one –  Alexey Jul 9 '12 at 21:44
18  
Pictures do describe a 1000 words :) –  user892871 Aug 16 '12 at 20:20
1  
I think ISO has upgraded pictures, so they now describe 2^10 words. –  Bill Karwin Dec 7 '12 at 17:59
1  
@BillKarwin: they did, but with certain category restrictions on diagrams attempting to boost their scores by containing additional words; each word (I guess Aa(N) can count as one such word) is deducted from the rating, and so this one loses 16 Wordsworth of value, leaving it valued at 1111110000₂ words. –  Chris Morgan Dec 29 '12 at 16:44

Adapter and Bridge are certainly related, and the distinction is subtle. It's likely that some people who think they are using one of these patterns are actually using the other pattern.

The explanation I've seen is that Adapter is used when you're trying to unify the interfaces of some incompatible classes that already exist. The Adapter functions as a kind of translator to implementations that could be considered legacy.

Whereas the Bridge pattern is used for code that is more likely to be greenfield. You're designing the Bridge to provide an abstract interface for an implementation that needs to vary, but you also define the interface of those implementation classes.

Device drivers is an often-cited example of Bridge, but I'd say it's a Bridge if you're defining the interface spec for device vendors, but it's an Adapter if you're taking existing device drivers and making a wrapper-class to provide a unified interface.

So code-wise, the two patterns are very similar. Business-wise, they're different.

See also http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?BridgePattern

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thanks very nice –  Sebastien Lorber Jun 3 '11 at 15:44

In my experience, Bridge is the most often recurring pattern, because it's the solution whenever there are two orthogonal dimensions in the domain. E.g. shapes and drawing methods, behaviours and platforms, file formats and serializers and so forth.

And an advice: always think of design patterns from the conceptual perspective, not from the implementation perspective. From the right point of view, Bridge cannot be confused with Adapter, because they solve a different problem, and composition is superior to inheritance not because of the sake of itself, but because it allows to handle orthogonal concerns separately.

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1  
I encounter factory and singleton a lot more often than bridge though. –  Adriaan Koster Apr 21 '11 at 11:56

I have used the bridge pattern at work. I program in C++, where it is often called the PIMPL idiom (pointer to implementation). It looks like this:

class A
{
public: 
  void foo()
  {
    pImpl->foo();
  }
private:
  Aimpl *pImpl;
};

class Aimpl
{
public:
  void foo();
  void bar();
};  

In this example class A contains the interface, and class Aimpl contains the implementation.

One use for this pattern is to expose only some of the public members of the implementation class, but not others. In the example only Aimpl::foo() can be called through the public interface of A, but not Aimpl::bar()

Another advantage is that you can define Aimpl in a separate header file that need not be included by the users of A. All you have to do is use a forward declaration of Aimpl before A is defined, and move the definitions of all the member functions referencing pImpl into the .cpp file. This gives you the ability to keep the Aimpl header private, and reduce the compile time.

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2  
If you use this pattern then the AImpl doesn't even need a header. I just put it inline in the implementation file for the A class –  1800 INFORMATION Nov 26 '08 at 6:05
    
Your implementor is private. I have a new question in regards to this, see stackoverflow.com/questions/17680762/… –  Roland Jul 16 '13 at 15:28

for me i think of it as a mechanism where you can swap interfaces. In the real world you might have a class that can use more then one interface, Bridge lets you swap.

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To put shape example in code:

#include<iostream>
#include<string>
#include<cstdlib>

using namespace std;

class IColor
{
public:
    virtual string Color() = 0;
};

class RedColor: public IColor
{
public:
    string Color()
    {
        return "of Red Color";
    }
};

class BlueColor: public IColor
{
public:
    string Color()
    {
        return "of Blue Color";
    }
};


class IShape
{
public:
virtual string Draw() = 0;
};

class Circle: public IShape
{
        IColor* impl;
    public:
        Circle(IColor *obj):impl(obj){}
        string Draw()
        {
            return "Drawn a Circle "+ impl->Color();
        }
};

class Square: public IShape
{
        IColor* impl;
    public:
        Square(IColor *obj):impl(obj){}
        string Draw()
        {
        return "Drawn a Square "+ impl->Color();;
        }
};

int main()
{
IColor* red = new RedColor();
IColor* blue = new BlueColor();

IShape* sq = new Square(red);
IShape* cr = new Circle(blue);

cout<<"\n"<<sq->Draw();
cout<<"\n"<<cr->Draw();

delete red;
delete blue;
return 1;
}

The output is:

Drawn a Square of Red Color
Drawn a Circle of Blue Color

Note the ease with which new colors and shapes can be added to the system without leading to an explosion of subclasses due to permutations.

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