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The following code was a proof of concept for a message batching routine. Do I avoid goto like the plague and rewrite this code? Or do you think the goto is an expressive way to get this done?

If you'd rewrite please post some code...

var queue = new Queue<TraceItem>(this.batch);
while (this.connected)
{
    byte[] buffer = null;
    try
    {
        socket.Recv(out buffer);
    }
    catch
    {
        // ignore the exception we get when the socket is shut down from another thread
        // the connected flag will be set to false and we'll break the loop
    }

HaveAnotherMessage:
    if (buffer != null)
    {
        try
        {
            var item = TraceItemSerializer.FromBytes(buffer);
            if (item != null)
            {
                queue.Enqueue(item);

                buffer = null;
                if (queue.Count < this.batch && socket.Recv(out buffer, ZMQ.NOBLOCK))
                {
                    goto HaveAnotherMessage;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            this.ReceiverPerformanceCounter.IncrementDiagnosticExceptions();
            this.tracer.TraceException(TraceEventType.Error, 0, ex);
        }
    }

    // queue processing code
}
share|improve this question
11  
[ What do you think ](xkcd.com/292)? –  Josh K Jul 7 '10 at 18:38
5  
In this question, the word 'expressive' translates to: "sucky and embarrassing, but I might be able to rationalize it with a wordy label." Rewrite it. And reright it while you are at it. –  Adam Crossland Jul 7 '10 at 18:41
1  
At least you used a named label; I inherited some 'VB.NET' code that had numerous Gotos with numeric labels. It gave me flashbacks of GWBasic, with line numbers incrementing by 10 just in case you might need to insert some new code later. Please, have pity on the poor maintenance engineer who will later own your code and avoid the temptation. –  Dan Bryant Jul 7 '10 at 18:53
1  
@Dan: I remember the horror of having to add more then ten lines in any given section. –  Josh K Jul 7 '10 at 18:56
3  
goto: 2010..... –  Jamie Dixon Jul 7 '10 at 19:55

10 Answers 10

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Replace the goto with a do-while, or simply a while loop if you don't want the "always run once" functionality you have right now.

var queue = new Queue<TraceItem>(this.batch);
while (this.connected)
{
    byte[] buffer = null;
    try
    {
        socket.Recv(out buffer);
    }
    catch
    {
        // ignore the exception we get when the socket is shut down from another thread
        // the connected flag will be set to false and we'll break the loop
    }

    do {
        if (buffer != null)
        {
            try
            {
                var item = TraceItemSerializer.FromBytes(buffer);
                if (item != null)
                {
                    queue.Enqueue(item);
                    buffer = null;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                this.ReceiverPerformanceCounter.IncrementDiagnosticExceptions();
                this.tracer.TraceException(TraceEventType.Error, 0, ex);
            }
        }
    } while(queue.Count < this.batch && socket.Recv(out buffer, ZMQ.NOBLOCK))

    // queue processing code
}
share|improve this answer
1  
less code + clarity... less sucky and embarrassing. :) –  jsw Jul 7 '10 at 18:59
2  
Imo, I like Josh's answer better. –  corsiKa Jul 7 '10 at 19:11
1  
if you have a single if (xxx) goto LABEL; that should be a strong indication that you could rewrite this as a loop –  Dolphin Jul 7 '10 at 19:25

Goto will get you into some sticky situations

Pretty much sums up my thoughts on "goto."

Goto is bad programming practice for many reasons. Chief among them is that there is almost never a reason for it. Someone posted a do..while loop, use that. Use a boolean to check if you should continue. Use a while loop. Goto's are for interpreted languages and a call back to assembler days (JMP anyone?). You're using a high level language for a reason. So that you and everyone else doesn't look at your code and get lost.


To keep this answer somewhat current I'd like to point out that a combination of goto and bracing errors caused a major SSL bug in iOS and OS X.

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 for classic response –  Christopher Klein Jul 7 '10 at 18:42
2  
that happened to me earlier today! i'm thinking about writing a little vs2010 extension that sets the computer beeping when you type goto. –  jsw Jul 7 '10 at 19:06
2  
Actually, GOTO statements do have their advantages, provided they are used only when (1) the alternative solution(s) would be less readable or be less intuitive, and (2) it's easy to follow the flow of the program. –  Thomas Larsen Jul 8 '10 at 3:30
1  
For example, compare: -- while expression_1 while expression_2 ... if amazing_exception then goto get_out end if end while end while get_out: ... -- with the alternative (which is arguably less readable and intuitive): -- flag = false while expression_1 while expression_2 ... if amazing_exception then flag = true break end if end while if flag == true then break end if end while -- So many people hate GOTO for no good reason, but it does have its uses---they're just rare. ;-) –  Thomas Larsen Jul 8 '10 at 3:32
    
@Thomas: I disagree: gist.github.com/468178. Tell me that is not readable. How it is more readable to have the program flow jumping in and out of scope? –  Josh K Jul 8 '10 at 15:45

It's so amazingly easy to rid yourself of GOTO in this situation it makes me cry:

var queue = new Queue<TraceItem>(this.batch);
while (this.connected)
{
    byte[] buffer = null;
    try
    {
        socket.Recv(out buffer);
    }
    catch
    {
        // ignore the exception we get when the socket is shut down from another thread
        // the connected flag will be set to false and we'll break the loop
    }
    bool hasAnotherMessage = true
    while(hasAnotherMessage)
    {
        hasAnotherMessage = false;
        if (buffer != null)
        {
            try
            {
                var item = TraceItemSerializer.FromBytes(buffer);
                if (item != null)
                {
                    queue.Enqueue(item);

                    buffer = null;
                    if (queue.Count < this.batch && socket.Recv(out buffer, ZMQ.NOBLOCK))
                    {
                        hasAnotherMessage = true;
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                this.ReceiverPerformanceCounter.IncrementDiagnosticExceptions();
                this.tracer.TraceException(TraceEventType.Error, 0, ex);
            }
        }
    }
    // queue processing code
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 despite the fact that this answer was so easy :-) –  Jason Williams Jul 7 '10 at 18:44
1  
+1 for "makes me cry." –  Josh K Jul 7 '10 at 18:45
2  
+1 for demonstrating that nearly all GOTOs are just a minute of thought away from death. –  Adam Crossland Jul 7 '10 at 18:49
    
Heh... Apparently not that easy, since I messed up the body of the while loop. Ironically, the original works as intended thanks to the single if statement in the while block. –  Randolpho Jul 7 '10 at 18:52

I guess the goto is SLIGHTLY more readable intuitively... But if you WANTED to avoid it I think all you'd have to do is throw the code in a while(true) loop, and then have a break statement at the end of the loop for a normal iteration. And the goto could be replaced with a continue statement.

Eventually you just learn to read and write loops and other control flow structures instead of using goto statements, at least in my experience.

share|improve this answer

You could refactor is to something like this.

while (queue.Count < this.batch && buffer != null)
{
    try
    {
        var item = TraceItemSerializer.FromBytes(buffer);
        buffer = null;
        if (item != null)
        {
            queue.Enqueue(item);
            socket.Recv(out buffer, ZMQ.NOBLOCK)
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        this.ReceiverPerformanceCounter.IncrementDiagnosticExceptions();
        this.tracer.TraceException(TraceEventType.Error, 0, ex);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Kind of related to Josh K post but I'm writing it here since comments doesn't allow code.

I can think of a good reason: While traversing some n-dimensional construct to find something. Example for n=3 //...

for (int i = 0; i < X; i++)
    for (int j = 0; j < Y; j++)
        for (int k = 0; k < Z; k++)
            if ( array[i][j][k] == someValue )
            {
                //DO STUFF
                goto ENDFOR; //Already found my value, let's get out
            }
ENDFOR: ;
//MORE CODE HERE...

I know you can use "n" whiles and booleans to see if you should continue.. or you can create a function that maps that n-dimensional array to just one dimension and just use one while but i believe that the nested for its far more readable.

By the way I'm not saying we should all use gotos but in this specific situation i would do it the way i just mentioned.

share|improve this answer
    
You could just set i = X, j = Y, k = Z and then say continue;. –  Josh K Jan 7 '12 at 7:38

Umm, I'm not really sure you want to goto out of a try block. I'm pretty sure that is not a safe thing to do, though I'm not 100% sure on that. That just doesn't look very safe...

share|improve this answer
    
Would that apply to continue inside a while loop as well? (See my answer for what I mean) –  Platinum Azure Jul 7 '10 at 18:40
    
We know that works. I was just worried about breaking out of a critical type section with goto. Seems an area that could easily be buggy. –  Michael Dorgan Jul 7 '10 at 18:43
6  
Jumping out of scope is safe. It's jumping into scope that is unsafe. For this reason, C# does not allow you to jump into scope. Of course, if your critical section is being handled explicitly with function calls in the monitor namespace or whatever, you'll need to put those in a finally block. –  Brian Jul 7 '10 at 18:44
    
More than fair. Makes sense as well. Thanks. –  Michael Dorgan Jul 7 '10 at 18:45

Wrap the "HaveAnotherMessage" into a method that takes in the buffer and may call itself recursively. That would seem to be the easiest way to fix this.

share|improve this answer
3  
You think making the method recursive will make it better? :\ What's wrong with a simple loop? –  Brendan Long Jul 7 '10 at 18:43
9  
Using recursion to handle a possibly open-ended amount of data coming over a socket doesn't seem like the best idea. –  Adam Crossland Jul 7 '10 at 18:50
3  
@Adam At least no one is suggesting adding a try..catch(StackOverflowException) block :) –  Michael Stum Jul 7 '10 at 18:53
    
@Michael, I really wish that I had. –  Adam Crossland Jul 7 '10 at 18:55
    
-1: Recursion for open-ended socket reading? That's just asking for trouble! Bad idea! –  Platinum Azure Jul 7 '10 at 19:09

I would avoid goto in this case, and refactor it. The method reads too long in my opinion.

share|improve this answer

I think your method is too big. It mixes different levels of abstraction, like error processing, message retrieval and message processing.

If you refactor it in different methods, the goto naturally goes away (note: I assume your main method is called Process):

...

private byte[] buffer;
private Queue<TraceItem> queue;

public void Process() {
  queue = new Queue<TraceItem>(batch);
  while (connected) {
    ReceiveMessage();
    TryProcessMessage();
  }
}

private void ReceiveMessage() {
  try {
    socket.Recv(out buffer);
  }
  catch {
    // ignore the exception we get when the socket is shut down from another thread
    // the connected flag will be set to false and we'll break the processing
  }
}

private void TryProcessMessage() {
  try {
    ProcessMessage();
  }
  catch (Exception ex) {
    ProcessError(ex);
  }
}

private void ProcessMessage() {
  if (buffer == null) return;
  var item = TraceItemSerializer.FromBytes(buffer);
  if (item == null) return;
  queue.Enqueue(item);
  if (HasMoreData()) {
    TryProcessMessage();
  }
}

private bool HasMoreData() {
  return queue.Count < batch && socket.Recv(out buffer, ZMQ.NOBLOCK);
}

private void ProcessError(Exception ex) {
  ReceiverPerformanceCounter.IncrementDiagnosticExceptions();
  tracer.TraceException(TraceEventType.Error, 0, ex);
}

...
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