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I'm using MS Code Contracts and have run into a snag with using interface inheritance and ContractClassFor attributes.

Given these interfaces and contract classes:

[ContractClass(typeof(IOneContract))]
interface IOne { }
[ContractClass(typeof(ITwoContract))]
interface ITwo : IOne { }

[ContractClassFor(typeof(IOne))]
abstract class IOneContract : IOne { }
[ContractClassFor(typeof(ITwo))]
abstract class ITwoContract : IOneContract, ITwo { }

Let's say that IOne and ITwo are substantial interfaces. So IOneContract would have a significant amount of code in it for the necessary checks.

I don't want to duplicate all of that in ITwoContract for the IOne interfaces. I only want to add new contracts for the ITwo interfaces. Inheriting one contract class from another seems the likely way to reuse that code. Yet I get the following error:

EXEC : warning CC1066: Class 'ITwoContract' is annotated as being the contract for the interface 'ITwo' and cannot have an explicit base class other than System.Object.

Is this a limitation in Code Contracts or am I doing it wrong? We have a lot of interface inheritance in our project and this feels like a deal breaker for Code Contracts if I can't figure out how to work around this issue.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Instead of:

[ContractClassFor(typeof(ITwo))]
abstract class ITwoContract : IOneContract, ITwo { }

Just inherit the contract:

[ContractClassFor(typeof(ITwo))]
abstract class ITwoContract : ITwo { }

You only need to provide contracts on the methods which are new in ITwo. The contracts from IOneContract will be inherited automatically, and you can declare all the inherited IOne methods as abstract — in fact, you cannot provide contracts for IOne on ITwoContract, or CC will complain :)

For example, if you have this:

[ContractClass(typeof (IOneContract))]
interface IOne
{
    int Thing { get; }
}

[ContractClass(typeof (ITwoContract))]
interface ITwo : IOne
{
    int Thing2 { get; }
}

[ContractClassFor(typeof (IOne))]
abstract class IOneContract : IOne
{
    public int Thing
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() > 0);
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

[ContractClassFor(typeof (ITwo))]
abstract class ITwoContract : ITwo
{
    public int Thing2
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() > 0);
            return 0;
        }
    }

    public abstract int Thing { get; }
}

Then this implementation will say "unproven contract" on both methods, as expected:

class Two : ITwo
{
    public int Thing
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }

    public int Thing2
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }
}
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3  
Ah! The "and you can declare all the inherited IOne methods as abstract" bit was the key part I was missing. Thank you. –  scobi Jul 8 '10 at 15:41
    
The problem is, you still have to specify all the IOne methods in the abstract contract class ITwoContract. If IOne has say 50 methods, I need to repeat them for every interface that inherits from IOne - deeply tedious, and makes changes to IOne hard. –  Rob Aug 15 '13 at 9:24
    
If you have an interface with 50 methods then you'll probably find every change related to that interface tedious and hard because you'll be violating the Single Responsibility Principle. –  Rodolfo Grave Sep 2 '13 at 9:38
    
@porges do you know if classes marked with the ContractClassForAttribute can contain Contract.Assume(...) contracts? What I mean is, I've tried placing Contract.Assume(...) inside sealed concrete contract classes (implementing an abstract class), but the assumptions don't seem to "flow back" to the class for which the contracts are being specified. I keep getting CodeContracts: Suggested assume: ... with the suggested statement (which I've already placed in the contracts class marked with ContractClassForAttribute). –  fourpastmidnight Feb 24 at 4:19
    
@porges Never mind. I was inferring the intent of Contract.Assume incorrectly. This is used in your actual implementation code to tell the static checker that you believe the stated condition should be true at this point in your code, thus it is not a contract, per se. Just a hint to the static checker. –  fourpastmidnight Feb 24 at 4:22

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