Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a UITableView where I have the backgroud color set via

UIView *myView = [[UIView alloc] init];
if ((indexPath.row % 2) == 0)
    myView.backgroundColor = [UIColor greenColor];
else
    myView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];

cell.backgroundView = myView;
[myView release];

The problem I find is that when I edit a table (via setEditing:YES...) some cells of the same color invariable are next to each other. How do I force UITableView to fully redraw. reloadData is not doing a great job.

Is there are deep-cleaning redraw?

share|improve this question
    
did my answer help? – Jacob Relkin Jul 7 '10 at 20:22
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I had this issue before so I'll share with you how I solved it:

You can use a boolean flag (say it's called needsRefresh) to control the behavior of cell creation in -cellForRowAtIndexPath:

An example:

- (UITableViewCell*) tableView:(UITableView *) tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath*) indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueResuableCellWithIdentifier:SOME_ID];
    if(!cell || needsRefresh) {
       cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] init....] autorelease];
    }
    //.....
    return cell;
}

So, when you need a hard reload, set the needsRefresh flag to YES. Simple as a pimple.

share|improve this answer
    
It works. My program has a very complicated cell structure, so I had missed the right spot to apply your suggestion. Sorry for the inconvenience. – John Smith Jul 7 '10 at 23:18
    
will this not cause any memory leak? – David May 27 '11 at 15:57
1  
Oh yes, good catch. – Jacob Relkin May 27 '11 at 19:03
2  
I'm wondering where do you set the needsRefresh flag back to NO after performing all the required reloads... Should this solution be complimented by some sort of cell tracking that sets it back to false after updating all the visible cells? – luvieere Mar 6 '12 at 17:50
    
This is not true for custom cells created from NIB - stackoverflow.com/questions/3197816/… – applefreak Nov 2 '12 at 12:09

For me the accepted answer didn't really work since I had no idea when to set the needsRefresh back to YES.

What worked for me was:

 - (UITableViewCell*) tableView:(UITableView *) tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath*) indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueResuableCellWithIdentifier:customCellIdentifier];
    if(nil == cell) {
        cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc]  initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault
                                       reuseIdentifier:customCellIdentifier];
    }
    //.....
    return cell;
}

And then you change the customCellIdentifier value whenever you need to. This way the cells are also still reusable if you switch back to the original cell identifier.

share|improve this answer
    
I've put a slightly extended version of this below. – Chris Prince Aug 11 '14 at 8:48

I was able to solve this by adding a refresh variable to the table datasource. I used a dictionary for each cell, but there's an extra key called @"refresh":@"1", indicating the cell needs refreshing. Once it's updated, I set that key's value to @"0". So whenever the table is reloaded, make sure the key goes back to @"0" again.

share|improve this answer
#define TABLE_VIEW_CELL_DEFAULT_ID @"cellIdentifier"
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *tableViewCellIdentifier;
@property (nonatomic) NSUInteger tableViewCellIdentifierCount;

// By using a different cell identifier, this effectively flushes the cell 
// cache because the old cells will no longer be used.
- (void) flushTableViewCellCache
{
    self.tableViewCellIdentifierCount++;
    self.tableViewCellIdentifier = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%i", TABLE_VIEW_CELL_DEFAULT_ID, self.tableViewCellIdentifierCount];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

    MyTableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:self.tableViewCellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[MyTableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:self.tableViewCellIdentifier];
    }

    // rest of method...
}
share|improve this answer

The accepted method seems dirty, it just makes a bunch of new cells that are stored along with the bad ones. Here are a couple of solutions depending on your situation:

1. first, for the situation described in the question you should not dump your cells and create new views on every cycle. You need to tag your view and then get it back when from the cell when you get a reuse cell:

- (UITableViewCell*) tableView:(UITableView *) tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath*) indexPath {
    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueResuableCellWithIdentifier:SOME_ID];
    if(!cell) {
       cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] init];

         UIView *myView = [[UIView alloc] init];    
        cell.backgroundView = myView;

        [myView setTag:5]; //<------
    }

    UIView *myView =  [cell viewWithTag:5];  //<------
    if ((indexPath.row % 2) == 0)
        myView.backgroundColor = [UIColor greenColor];
    else
        myView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    return cell;
}

//then just reload the tableview.

2. ...or even better, why not just use the cell backgrouncolor and update that without creating a view.

3. A sure way to really clear out old cached cells it to simply recreate the UITableView object.

4. In most cases you dont need to destroy these cells, just keep track of your elements and update them after getting the reusable cell.You can tag all your elements, keep a array reference to them, find them thought the view hierarchy... Im sure theres a bunch of other ways.

5. heres a one liner to directly purge all cells, although not best practice to mess with the internals of objects like this as they might change in future versions:

[(NSMutableDictionary*)[tableview valueForKey:@"_reusableTableCells" ] removeAllObjects];
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.