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I have a basic DOM "outline" that contains a table with dummy data like this:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>name</td>
    <td>phone</td>
  </tr>
</table>

My script uses this as a dummy row to clone and replace the text between the TD tags with text from a database. Without copying the whole script here, here are two different things I've tried:

newRow.find("td.name").text(participant.name);

newRow.find("contains("phone")").text(participant.homePhone);

Neither one works. The script clones and displays the rows just fine, but I have 30 rows of "name" and "phone".

I used Firebug's console.log to debug and I am sure that it's got the data correctly from JSON, loaded into the "participant" parameter. What am I doing wrong?

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1  
really need to see the rest of the script / markup – redsquare Jul 7 '10 at 19:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second version is almost right if I understand what you are tring to do. Note the colon preceding the selector and the use of inner single quotes.

newRow.find(":contains('name')").text(participant.name);
newRow.find(":contains('phone')").text(participant.homePhone);

Better yet would be to give the templates classes and use those or simply rely on the positioning.

Positioning:

newRow.find('td:first-child')
      .text(participant.name)
      .next()
      .text(participant.homePhone);

Classes:

newRow.find( 'td.name' ).text( participant.name );
newRow.find( 'td.phone' ).text( participant.homePhone );

Necessitating this change:

<table> 
  <tr> 
    <td class="name">name</td> 
    <td class="phone">phone</td> 
  </tr> 
</table>
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Thanks. I picked this one as the answer, although almost everybody told me to use classes. Of course! It's working now. – Carrie Cobol Jul 9 '10 at 16:40
    
@Carrie - Note that classes are a good way to do it. I wouldn't use the contains method as you might have issues if someone's name includes the string phone, for instance. The DOM-relative mechanism works well but is sensitive to changes in the table structure. – tvanfosson Jul 9 '10 at 16:45

you're using td.name which doesn't exist in your markup. the .name denotes a class so you'd need markup like: <td class="name"></td> in order for that to work.

If you're using this as a dummy row and replacing those two td's, I'd supply a class to each like <td class="name"></td><td class="phone"></td> to use newRow.find("td.name") or use something like: newRow.find("td:first") and newRow.find("td:last")

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newRow.find("td:contains(name)").text(participant.name);

newRow.find("td:contains(phone)").text(participant.homePhone);
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Now, what would happen if the participants name is Stephone Andrews? – Gert Grenander Jul 7 '10 at 19:36
    
hehe . i agree using classnames makes more sense, but i was attempting to correct his supplied logic & not redirect him to a better solution... – Scott Evernden Jul 7 '10 at 19:41
    
@Gert G - you're right. I wasn't thinking. – tvanfosson Jul 7 '10 at 20:31

find('td.name') looks for a td with a class="name", which you don't have. I would recommend adding this to your HTML to create a hook for jQuery to update the text. Especially if you have several on the page.

Also, how are you setting newRow?

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